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X-37B Avionics Cockpit

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posted on May, 5 2013 @ 07:36 AM
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I know that the X-37B flies un-manned, but does anyone knows what the avionics look like?
Is like the standard Primary Flight Displays which are seen on Boeing aircrafts or Airbuses with the Altitude tape on the irhgt and Airspeed to the left?

And how does the X-37B know which path or approach to fly into Vandenberg? Is it pre-programmed on its onboard GPS systems?




posted on May, 5 2013 @ 07:45 AM
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My guess! Like a series of black boxes. It does not need visual type instruments since there is nobody to read them.

P



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 07:48 AM
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What do u mean by black boxes?
Does it have acutally GPS data on them like a green text fonts? Sort of like those old mainframe CRT workstations?

And how does the vehicle know what approach path to take to VAFB?
Is all the data pre-programed already before the launch ever takes place?



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by darpa999
What do u mean by black boxes?
Does it have acutally GPS data on them like a green text fonts? Sort of like those old mainframe CRT workstations?

And how does the vehicle know what approach path to take to VAFB?
Is all the data pre-programed already before the launch ever takes place?


It will have the same type of avionics as a normal spacecraft, it just wont have a human interface as it doesn't need one. Thats what he means by black boxes. Theres no cockpit so there are no controls/displays. Just mission computers, sensors and data links.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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It has a manned control center like UAV's. On board are just LRU's (boxes with electronics like your cable box or computer).



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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So for example, the X-37B does NOT fly into Vandenberg AFB by itself?
Meaning that it has to be controlled remotely from the ground to guide it to the runway path?



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by darpa999
So for example, the X-37B does NOT fly into Vandenberg AFB by itself?
Meaning that it has to be controlled remotely from the ground to guide it to the runway path?


No one is quite sure; the Air Force is extremely tight-lipped about this one. It is not inconceivable that the X-37 is capable of fully autonomous flight. It really wouldn't take much as for an avionics/telemetry package (with the help of ground stations) to bring the bird in on its own.

That said, I am quite positive that mission control has a backup to a backup to make sure their little experimental space plane doesn't miscalculate something on reentry.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 12:09 PM
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for all you know there could be a HIGHLY Trained monkey in there with a full HUD and a Mini-joystick crafted to exactly the same shape as his hand... I would love to see him in his little space suit



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by darpa999
So for example, the X-37B does NOT fly into Vandenberg AFB by itself?
Meaning that it has to be controlled remotely from the ground to guide it to the runway path?


It has the capability to do things autonomously after being programed to do things. Like auto landing. It does not just go do stuff by making it's own decisions but can act out preprogrammed commands on its own. like you can click go fly over Iran and take pictures of this spot and it can then do so without further instructions. It does not make decisions though. If it finds itself drifting off course it can correct itself. If it encounters wind sheer on landing it might abort and come around for another try stuff like that. Even mars rovers do this
edit on 5-5-2013 by Xeven because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-5-2013 by Xeven because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by darpa999

That said, I am quite positive that mission control has a backup to a backup to make sure their little experimental space plane doesn't miscalculate something on reentry.


Yeah humans can take control but even the Space shuttle computers handled re-enrty.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by Xeven
 


Wasn't saying it didn't have that capability. My point is, is we can only speculate as to what types of avionics the X-37 has on-board. For all we know it is a test bed for much more advanced systems than we have ever seen. One thing is for sure though, they tell it to land at X,Y coordinates and it calculates the path based on very well known variables; just as the shuttle did.

Now to more speculative notions, I believe they are testing maneuverability within space (near Earth orbit to be more exact) with this fascinating bird. Moving it from different orbits and trajectories, unlike a satellite that pretty much is static in its orbit.






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