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Pennsylvania judge sentenced to 28 years in prison for selling teens to prisons

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posted on May, 5 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


That's a shocker! You are a felon?? Who would have guessed? But no love for the homeboys?? Nah, they ought to burn, right? Pfffffffft




posted on May, 5 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


Yeah sure.... nice thought out response.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


Oh wow!

I was wondering how this would turn out.

Justice.
Well what do you know?

It does exist...well...at least on a part-time basis.

- Lee



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by GrantedBail
reply to post by onequestion
 


That's a shocker! You are a felon?? Who would have guessed? But no love for the homeboys?? Nah, they ought to burn, right? Pfffffffft



It's very easy to be a felon. Driving down the highway one night, late into the morning, and doing 90 mph in a 55 mph zone, cop pulls me over. Says to me, Sir, you're over the limit by more that 30 mph, in this state that's a felony. You're using your car as a weapon. I didn't know this. Haden't a clue. The only two people on the highway thiat night were me and the cop. I was mining my own business, listening to music, and cruzin, man. Not bothering anyone, since the road was empty as far as the eye could see. Except, this cop hiding in the bushes. Didn't spot hum till too late. He wasn't even on the road, he was parked off the road.; So, basically, I had the road all to myself. Yet, according to him, I'm using my car as a weapon. Really. What, like some deer was about to jump the highway or something? Anyway, for a few months I was a felon. Until I explained to the judge that the cop had deliberately parked his car just after the speed limit sign changed from 65 mph to 55 mph, knowing full well that drivers would often miss the first sign that changed the limits, and so I thought I was still in the 65 mph zone. Judge accepted my explanation, since I wasn't trying to get off scot free, and reduced the claim to 25 mph over the limit. I escaped the "felony" designation by 5 mph. Whew! What a relief, I can still buy a gun.

Lesson learned. If you want to be able to buy guns in the US, make sure never to travel more that 29 mph over the limit in any state.

It's that easy to become a felon. The only difference between me and that felon today is "5 mph."



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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Why should the tax payer pay to house this scumbag, should of got death penalty. Ruining the lives of so many.
edit on 5-5-2013 by sean because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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wow i wonder if this happens alot.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by onequestion

You guys really need context to understand what really happened. What happened was all these dumbass kids really did do something stupid but the punishment they received was not proportional to the crime. Most of these kids are friends of mine, non of their lives were "ruined" most of them are still doing stupid # and getting in trouble.


I don't know the details of every youth sent there, and am willing to agree with you that some were involved in some petty crimes, hopefully non violent, but violating a citizens constitutional rights ranks up there with being quite serious. That is what our country was founded on, and corrupt people in charge would like to soon forget that.



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 11:00 PM
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In the private prison industry the more time an inmate spends in a facility, the more of a profit is reaped from the state.


And people wonder why the world's f#cked.

Crime: $$$
War: $$$
Illness: $$$
Terror: $$$
Environmental Destruction: $$$
Corruption: $$$


...Human Decline & Degradation (on all fronts): $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$




...Peace & Human Prosperity: $0.00.




God bless the System eh? Praise the hand that feeds. Where the hell would we be without it?


Not sick, poor and/or in prison, probably


How long, O Lord? How f#cking long indeed? Humanity is becoming a joke with no punchline. I don't know how much longer I can stand waking up to stories like this every goddamned day




edit on 5/5/2013 by TheAnarchist because: ~



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:16 AM
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wtfu???????????



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 
I am NOT for privatization of prisons (or mental institutions, but that is another issue) for this very reason. There is no motivation to ever have people leave, only to "build the business" and retain/add prisoners as long as possible - perhaps that's why we have so many prisoners to some degree? And in the case of prisons, correct me if I'm wrong here but don't WE pay for it anyway? The taxpayers fund these private institutions on behalf of the state for holding onto our duly processed (?!?!?!?!?) criminals.

Okay, so I'm not an expert in this. I may be spouting off a bit. But this kind of thing makes me very angry.
Who will give these kids their lives back? The time they could have been getting their educations? Who will repay their families for the loss of their children (assuming most of the parents cared about them)? What horrible things happened to them while they were there in that environment, and who will pay for the years and years of therapy they might need to recover from this? Ok - even if they weren't the "best and brightest" kids with amazing futures ahead of them - injustice is injustice. Shadowy times... grrrrr....



- AB
edit on 6-5-2013 by AboveBoard because: changes...



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by GrantedBail
 


HAHAHAHA 28 years in prison for a judge who wrongfully placed people in prison? How much you bet he doesn't make it 28 days before they have some fun with THIS guy? Squeeeeeeeeeeeeeel Like a Pig!



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


This makes me remind myself of what a world we live in. What we as people have become, or always have been. It is equally depressing.

I'm sure there many more and even worse cases...waiting to be discovered.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by Merinda
 


Good riddance I say!

But I also wonder how many, if any, of these juvenile defenders lost their lives while serving a prison sentence which should never have been dealt them and who will end up paying the costs should any family decide to lay a suite against the state for unjust imprisonment( I don't know it would actually be called)?



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 10:06 AM
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I don't get why everyone is happy.
Sure the judge is in prison for 28yrs, great

But what about those he conspired with in private prisons, what about those guys?

There will be more judges like this
Don't be happy because nothing is being done about the root of the problem



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 03:45 PM
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Seen this a couple weeks ago and thought it was pretty relevant. This is the story of Robert Leone and the craziness he endured when dealing with the Pennsylvania legal system. This video had me fuming by the end!!

www.youtube.com...
edit on 7-5-2013 by bmullini because: screwed up link to video, sorry



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 04:40 PM
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The merger of corporations and the state is the basis of fascism and excess profits opens the door to corruption; ergo, the privatization of prisons is not a good idea.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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That is a life sentence for an old turd like this...and rightly so. What about those giving him money?



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by GrantedBail
reply to post by cconn487
 


From the link in the OP:

According to allgov.com Ciavearella's cases from 2003 - 2008 were reviewed by a special investigative panel and later by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and it was found that upwards of 5,000 young men and women were denied their constitutional rights, and therefore all of their convictions were dismissed and were summarily released



But it mashed up their chances of getting an education and going to college. Though they were paid compensation for their jail-time. Some students were arrested for something like a ticket violation or not paying a fine, and ended up months in prison.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by stormcell
 


Thats true. You cant pay them back for that experience. Prison is hell, worse for children. Youth authority is the most violent prison in America.





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