It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Constitution 101: Is there a correct way to interpret and view the Constitution? Yes!

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 2 2013 @ 11:13 PM
link   
At least Brion McClanahan seems to think so!



I looked up some of his stuff and found this:

www.brionmcclanahan.com...



I am often asked by my students and at public speaking events for a list of books to consult on the document. My first response is typically anything written by the founding generation on the document, particularly in the months after the Constitution was sent to the States for ratification. That is the Constitution the founding generation ratified. Much of this material is available for free on the Web, but if anyone is interested in spending a few bucks, the following ten books are a the best place to start for both digesting the Constitution as the founding generation intended it to be interpreted and how it has been destroyed by the political class in Washington in the last one-hundred years. The books are in no order.


Book recommendations in the link.
www.brionmcclanahan.com...




posted on May, 2 2013 @ 11:27 PM
link   
I'm sure you'd find most of these on Obama's nightstand...of course they'll be buried under "Golf Digest"! Just kidding - they really won't be buried because they're not there at all.....



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 11:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by Maluhia
I'm sure you'd find most of these on Obama's nightstand...of course they'll be buried under "Golf Digest"! Just kidding - they really won't be buried because they're not there at all.....


If I had to guess, I'd say Obama's #1 favorite is "Rules for Radicals"

I'm definitely going to check out, "Founding Father's Guide to The Constitution" by McClanahan.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 09:37 AM
link   
reply to post by eLPresidente
 


I think we can gather the exact intent of the framers of the Constitution by reading their correspondence s to one another while crafting the document.

Otherwise known as the Federalist Papers.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 09:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by eLPresidente
 


I think we can gather the exact intent of the framers of the Constitution by reading their correspondence s to one another while crafting the document.

Otherwise known as the Federalist Papers.


Don't forget the ANTI federalist papers!!!!


No serious student of the Constitution can be without both sides of the story. Some Anti Federalist prophecies have strangely come true. Writings by "Brutus" and "A Federal Farmer," particularly relating to the "necessary and proper" clause (Article I, Section 8, Clause 18), view the future under an unrestrained Congress. Although the "necessary and proper" clause was never meant to be a blanket grant of power, over the years, as the intentions of the Founding Fathers have passed further and further from our memories, all three branches of the federal government have assumed things that simply do not -and never did -exist. As the States have forgotten how to be a check against a Congress run amok, things are getting worse.

www.anamericanvision.com...



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 09:53 AM
link   
reply to post by eLPresidente
 


So the correct way to interpret the Constitution is how this guy says to interpret it



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 10:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by eLPresidente
 


I think we can gather the exact intent of the framers of the Constitution by reading their correspondence s to one another while crafting the document.

Otherwise known as the Federalist Papers.


The Federalist Papers were written and published in newspapers in NY and other ares to convince the public that ratification of the Constitution was a good idea. By definition, they are propaganda. Don't get me wrong, I have read them many times, and they are a valuable tool when trying to figuring out the framers original intent, but for full context and perspective you must also read the "Anti-Federalist Papers". I tend to side more with the Ani-Federalists like Patrick Henry and George Mason.

Anti-Federalist Papers



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 10:52 AM
link   
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 



I tend to side more with the Ani-Federalists like Patrick Henry and George Mason.


Ditto. Many people don't know that there wouldn't BE a Bill of Rights without the anti federalist's demands to add them. And even then the federalists had provided plenty of loopholes within the constitution itself to undermine those enumerated rights incrementally. As we can plainly see.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 04:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by frazzle
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 



I tend to side more with the Ani-Federalists like Patrick Henry and George Mason.


Ditto. Many people don't know that there wouldn't BE a Bill of Rights without the anti federalist's demands to add them. And even then the federalists had provided plenty of loopholes within the constitution itself to undermine those enumerated rights incrementally. As we can plainly see.




You couldn't be more correct



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 05:28 PM
link   
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 


Sometimes I wish I'd been less curious about history. The hardest part is not knowing how to get people to listen and understand, they just point fingers and shout, "you hate America".

I'll bet no more than one in fifty Americans has ever read the warnings from the anti federalists and probably even fewer could name more than a few of the 39 men who signed the constitution or know anything about them.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 11:31 PM
link   
Interpretation of the constitution isn't very difficult. All you have to do is read quotes of our early american politicians said. Most of them are directly, or indirectly talking about a specific amendment, or section of the constitution. Or you could even just read about how their life was, and what they did to try and figure out what kind of personality they had, and put yourself in their shoes to try and decide how they would think or feel towards a particular thing. Interpretation of the constitution is fairly easy, the problem is people who try to distort it to fit their own ideals. And of course your going to have people in full blow denial, and will keep on interpreting a certain part of our constitution in the wrong type of way, then other people will start to believe this, and eventually, we begin to forget what everything was SUPPOSED to be like.

One thing is for sure, our forefathers believed heavily in a balanced democratic process, which is supposed to put the people in power, not the government in power of the people. They also believed heavily in people having personal freedoms/liberties.



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join