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5-year-old Kentucky boy fatally shoots 2-year-old sister with gift rifle

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posted on May, 2 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by Indigo5
 


Your post makes zero sense, but has come to represent the reasoning abilities of the average citizen. Eric the Awful makes valid points, and you shoot back with "let's legalize murder", or "let's stop looking for the cure for cancer", as if that is what he was saying.

Perhaps thinking through what you post before you post it is in order. We cannot deny ignorance if we are so busy trying to argue back that we not only fail to make our point, but we embarass ourselves in the process.




posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by bloodreviara
 


A five year old cannot own a gun. You have to be 18 to buy a rifle/ shotgun and 21 to buy a handgun. Even though it is the "child's" gun he should not control it. These parents were full of negligence.

reply to post by brew8537
 


There is nothing wrong with a child getting to shoot a gun and "getting" one for a gift. As for tripping and shooting themselves you do not take it out to shoot with it loaded. You load it when you are ready to shoot at your target.

My 6 year old uses a fork and knife just fine; he used them fine at 5. He shoots great and knows more about gun safety then most adults. I let him carry his rifle (the same one from this story I also go over the rifle at the bottom of page 7), but it is locked and unusable. If you look at the overview I do of the rifle at the bottom of page 7 you will see what these parents should have done. You can make this rifle to be nothing more than a fancy club, or you can load it and have the firing pin pulled back (like they did) and have it be lethal.

The problem is not the gun, the child "having" the gun (technically it cannot be his and should not be handled unsupervised) is not the problem. The problem is the parents leaving the gun loaded (it is very easy to make sure it is not if they had used the lock) and having it ready to shoot (while my son can shoot this and used kitchen utensils I do not believe he can pull the firing pin back into the set point). The problem is the negligence on the parents part of leaving the loaded gun unsupervised.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:07 PM
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reply to post by Raist
 


Here, I'll show them again, just like I did on page 12 here:








posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by votan
 


I have the same rifle for my son who is 6. It has precautions/safety to make it a fancy club. It stays locked when not it use. He only handles it under supervision and with me at full attention of him. His aim is very good. His knowledge of gun safety is better than most adults. He knows how to properly carry and hold the gun at all times. His finger never touched the trigger unless he has his target in sight.

I was hunting with .22 and 410 long before 13. The problem is not the gun. The problem is stupid parents who do not follow the simple rules of gun safety. There should be a lot more training on firearms and I would suggest making it mandatory. I recommend that anyone who does not own or wish to carry a firearm take training courses as you can gain a lot of knowledge from such training.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


If you read my post my 6 year old uses the same rifle. I give him full attention when it is in his hands though. These parents were totally irresponsible.

I even go over the rifle at the bottom of page 7.

There are age limits. You must be 18 to buy a rifle/shotgun and 21 to buy a handgun.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by Mogget
 


My reasoning and mindset are fine thanks. My son uses the same rifle. However, unlike these parents he has my full attention and I have my arms around him when he is shooting it.

It is stored as a fancy club, it is totally unusable at this point unless I personally make it useable.

My son has also learn gun safety that many adults do not know. He is far safer than most adults and I trust him far more. He is also a great shot.

My son is 6 by the way.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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A child 5 or 6 years old has NO effing idea about death, violence or what a gun COULD potentially might do.
SOME kids at 5 cannot even wipe their *** yet after pooping.

For me it's simply insanity to give a gun to a child, REGARDLESS whether the parent is supervising the kid while it is handling the gun. It's just fricking insane. It's a child and still has to learn and be taught a lot of things, not given a device where a single pull of the trigger COULD potentially cause either its own or others harm/death.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I have posted it many times, but I will continue to post it.

My son uses the same rifle he is 6. He is a great shot and far better with gun safety than most adults.

I give him full attention with my arms around him when he is shooting. The gun is kept in a fashion that it is totally useless until I make it usable. My son also is not handling the gun without me being there with him. I and only I am allowed to let him shoot it. No one else but me is given that permission not even my wife. The reason for that is because I have more experience than she does with firearms.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


I would like to see mandatory training for all who buy a firearm. I recommend that everyone take some firearm training just to get to know guns. I think you should take any and every training available for firearms.

I was raised around them. I had a BB gun at his age and was shooting other guns not much later on. My son is 6 and "has" uses the same gun from the story.

The difference between me and those parents in the story is I make sure I am responsible. The gun is kept in a nonfunctioning fashion when not in use and only I am allowed to take him to shoot it. He is a great shot and safer with a gun than many adults including some that I know.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I cannot give you enough stars for this.

BTW you photos are much better than mine


I agree that there is no way the child loaded and armed the gun on his own. The parents left it loaded and cocked. When my son is shooting the same rifle the only thing he does is aim and fire the gun. I do the rest and have my arms on him while he is shooting.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:47 PM
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My son is 11 years old and he went to gun safety camp.His papaw gave him a gun ,a .22 rifle this past christmas.He does not touch that gun unless I get it out for him and we go to either the shooting range or the farm.The ammo and the gun are kept separate and my son know the respect you treat any firearm.

This tragic accident was the fault of the parents because the gun was loaded and the child was so young.Gun safety must be taught at an early age and the responsibility of the parents is make sure that gun is in a safe place and the chamber empty.

On another note,my son had a classmate killed a few years ago by a bb gun.The bb penetrated though his skin and penetrated his heart. There is nothing safe in this world ,it is our job as parents to protect our children for as long as we can.When they are all a bunch of idiots,well,need I say more.

www.wave3.com...



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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The parents can't be with their kids all the time supervising them, that is why gun safes and gun racks with a lock are a good idea. People want to show their kids about shooting them and whatnot fine, although I think it is a bad idea personally, but to each his own.

The big deal here is that some people are so paranoid of the government that they want no gun laws at all. They continue to make strawman arguements and sidetrack the discussion with off-topic nonsense.

Some guns have built-in safety features but that is nowhere near enough. All it takes is one lapse of judgement to leave a gun loaded. I had knew someone in high school that got killed because his father was a cop and left his revolver loaded. Bad things can happen even with good parents. The kids were teasing each other and the gun went off.

Guns belong in safes, not on tables or on chairs.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 


As both eriktheawful and I have point out the gun has a lock built in it. It was not being used though. Not only that but also like eriktheawful pointed out the gun could have even been stored with the bolt action out.

These parents failed for not using common sense and gun safety.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I am with you on gun safety. It is rule number one, no ifs ands or buts about it.


When my son is shooting I am right there with him full attention to him. When he is handling the gun I am there and he is already far safer than most adults.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


And it is a great starter rifle, as long as there is full supervision by an adult when the gun is handled.

My son aged 6 has the same rifle. He uses more gun safety than most adults. I am with him when he handles it and only I am allowed to take him to shoot it. Training from an early age is not the same as giving them one to do with as they please.

These parents are one hundred percent to blame. Not for buying the gun but for allowing it to be loaded and handled unsupervised. The gun should be locked (or like it my case made inoperable).

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Ah thank you, I was catching up from last night.

You photos are much clearer than mine btw, great job


It really is a great rifle. Going to get a scope and rifle bag for this one later this year.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by flexy123
 


If you are not fully attentive when supervising them I agree. The rest of your post I disagree with (at least on a child to child basis).

My son who is 6 uses the same rifle. He carries it but it is locked. I am with him with my arms around him when he is shooting. He aims and fires. I do the rest when it comes to loading and cocking.

The child in the story could not have cocked it on his own. The firing pin spring has too much tension on it. These parents are full of stupid for leaving a loaded and cocked gun sitting in the corner.

My son has more gun sense than many adults. He keeps the gun pointed at the ground until he is ready to shoot. You might say he does not understand, but he does. You can ask him why and he will tell you, he also knows that death is a forever thing. He recalls his great grandmother dying and knows he cannot see her any more because she is dead forever.

He might not completely understand death in your mind but he does know what it means. He knows there is no coming back. He also knows that the rifle is not a toy and it is only to be handled when I am there. The gun is kept inoperable until I make it so.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


The best safety feature along with the lock that is built in it, would be to remove the bolt action and store it separately just like ammunition.

With out that the gun cannot shoot or even hold a round. The gun is inoperable until the bolt is placed in it and the lock unlocked.

Raist



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by Indigo5

Originally posted by crazylexxi
Regulate meant well trained.


And this is what I am talking about...educating yourself via idealogical propaganda...

Just refer to a dictionary of the time...

Let's see.. The second amendment written in 1791.
7
Dictionary of the English Language 1792...


Regulate [regula latin]
1. To adjust by rule or method
2. To direct

books.google.com...

Referring to the militia. Yes.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by xEphon
Guns are 43 times more likely to kill a household member over an intruder.
People really need to rethink their priorities when handing out guns to children.


Guess i must be a lucky one. Never had to fire mine once yet, never lost a family member either but then again i have a HAMMERLOCK, and i don't leave it loaded or a round chambered and the safety is on when i'm not at target practice. So, for the gun owners who have lost family members, it's an expensive lesson they will never forget.

There is no excuse for leaving firearms unsecured, loaded and laying around where any person can just bump along, pick it up and blow their own faces off.



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