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Calling all Astrophotographers, all skill levels. Post your work.

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posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by wmd_2008
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hi erik can you not set your camera to full manual control? It's still no great weather for me to try this it's only really dark for 2-3 and most nights I have had cloud cover.


Yes, I can set it for "Manual", however, the lens does not have a f stop ring on it. It's controlled electronically by the camera.

However, the urge to control things more over came my fear of voiding the warranty and my camera now has Magic Lantern installed on it! So now I can change the f stop, make exposure times much, much longer.....and even trigger the camera to take a picture by clapping my hands! Ha!




posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by wmd_2008
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hi erik can you not set your camera to full manual control? It's still no great weather for me to try this it's only really dark for 2-3 and most nights I have had cloud cover.


Yes, I can set it for "Manual", however, the lens does not have a f stop ring on it. It's controlled electronically by the camera.

However, the urge to control things more over came my fear of voiding the warranty and my camera now has Magic Lantern installed on it! So now I can change the f stop, make exposure times much, much longer.....and even trigger the camera to take a picture by clapping my hands! Ha!


Neither does my camera but I can still set an aperture manually


From 1100d manual




edit on 12-8-2013 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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Below is my first attempt at using an auto-guider. Actually my second attempt. On my first try, I suffered from a bad case of RTFM and couldn't get the guider working.

I used M57 in my first attempt because it was in a great location in my sky just past the meridian where the light pollution is less. It's also one of the easiest DSOs to post process. I took 20 lights at ISO 400 and 180 seconds exposure time and also took 20 darks. The result was far better than my previous M57 images and I think I am going to enjoy shooting guided images.




Vince



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


yes. Now how low can you lower the f stop?

On my old Canon FD 50mm lens, I can set it to f 1.8

With this modern lens, even in manual, the lowest I can set the f stop to is 3.5

edit on 12-8-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by vinceg
 


Wow!

Great picture for only your 2nd time trying!



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:07 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


yes. Now how low can you lower the f stop?

On my old Canon FD 50mm lens, I can set it to f 1.8

With this modern lens, even in manual, the lowest I can set the f stop to is 3.5

edit on 12-8-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)


My 18-55 kit lens is the same it's still better than f5.6.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by wmd_2008
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hi erik have the lens wide open and try iso 3200 / 6400 I have see a few shots doing that.


Those shots were at ISO 6400. The f stop is controlled by the software and will not go any lower than f5.6

I'm SERIOUSLY considering using that firmware that you gave me a link to that "upgrades" the camera so I can take longer exposures and change other settings, etc.

Of course that means I'll have to build a new Barn Door Tracker. Fun times!


Erik, the MagicLantern software won't allow your lens to open more than f5.6. That is a limitation of your lens. Most cheap zoom lenses are F5.6, just beware of Sigma lenses. Some of them state that they are F5.6, but optically they are actually F6.3. Get yourself a 50mm F1.8 lens, they are quite cheap, and is much better, and faster than a zoom lens for astrophotography.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:57 AM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


His kit lens opens to f3.5 it's an 18-55mm



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


The lens is a Canon EF-S 18-55mm f3.5 - 5.6 IS II



Canon does make a EF 50mm f1.8 II as the cheapest of those at about $125.00 (still more than I can blow right now).

I have a old Dejur FD 80 - 210mm f3.8-22 telephoto lens that I was able to make an adapter for, and was able to give it 1/4 turn past the infinity focus stop, so even though Canon changed the distance from the camera frame to the back plane in their modern DSLR cameras, I can focus to infinity with it (I just don't have all the neat electronic features with it of course).

I do have my old Canon AE-1 SLR camera's FD 50mm f1.8 lens that I could try the adapter on, but I will have to see if I can make it focus past it's infinity stop.

That is one thing I do hate about the EF-S 18-55mm lens that came with my new camera: it focuses past infinity and I'm so used to the old FD lenses where the stop is infinity. So I end up with out of focus blob stars, hehehe:




posted on Aug, 28 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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Not my best work on Orion, but I did a test shot today as I was wrapping up with the Atik Titan-C to see how well it does as a primary imager on my main scope (normally it serves as an autoguider while my SLR is imaging). It's got a pretty nice dynamic range and low noise when the peltier fan is running, considering the price point of the camera. These were only 20 second sub exposures (through astronomical twilight and probably ended somewhere around nautical twilight). Darks, flats, bias calibration frames were collected and used. Astronomik UHC and IR blocking filters were used as well.

Alternative processing:

Different tonemapping algorithms were used for the two above versions, can't really decide which I like more. The first one is a bit less noisy and closer in appearance to reality, the second is more contrasty but it has an over-HDR'ed sort of look to it. Some people like that though, so decide for yourselves lol.
edit on 28-8-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-8-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 07:17 PM
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here is one of my pics, I dont have telescope and I only used my camera...

I cropped it from a 22mpixel sensor..

camera : EOS 5D mark2
lens : canon 70-200 2.8
with tripod





Here is one with my 10mp sensor

camera 40d (40d is 1.6 crop factor camera, so it looks more magnified)
lens : canon 70-200 2.8
with tripod


edit on 19-9-2013 by Ploutonas because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 07:43 AM
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Thought I'd try and keep this thread going. Here are some of my attempts. They're not in the same league as some of the others but I'm only just starting out with imaging and don't have the best equipment for DSOs.








posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by router404
 


Very nice images

I am looking forward to the winter nights here in the UK to try a few things out including some timelapse work.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 01:23 AM
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I recently got a used 40D with a 50 mm lens. ISO was set at 1600 with f7 exposure was 4 mins. Wasn't the effect I was looking for. Question for those experienced astro photographers. How do you get shots of the milky way? Apparently long exposures isn't the answer due to star trails. Also how do you set a lens to infinity?

Uploaded with ImageShack.com
edit on 27-9-2013 by w810i because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-9-2013 by w810i because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 01:52 AM
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I haven't got a Canon 40D but I imagine the process would be pretty similar in getting focus.
Presuming your camera is on a tripod.

Find a really bright star, say Vega, Arcturus, Capella or Altair etc.
Open up your live view screen on your camera and crank up the ISO as far as the camera will let you.

Try and get the bright star on the centre of your screen.

Then use manual focus to try and get the star as sharp as possible.

On my EOS 700d I then use the magnify button on live view and push that up to x10 so I can use manual focus to get the star as sharp as possible.

Once you're in focus, crank the ISO back down to where you want it for your shot and re-frame for whatever your taking.

You should be able to get shots of 20-30 seconds without star trailing. Longer than that and you'll need some sort of manual or motorised tracking.

Hope this helps, probably more experienced people on here who can give some extra pointers.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 02:30 AM
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reply to post by router404
 


Thanks Mate! I didn't even consider live view.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:00 AM
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reply to post by w810i
 


I have problems with my Rebel T3i setting the lens to infinity (it goes past that), and I was used to the old Cannon lenses that the mechanically stopped at infinity focus.

What I did was this: during the day, focused the camera on a object quite far away, then then using a marker, I marked where the lens was set at.

Then at night, I use a flash light to check the lens is set to Manual Focus and turn it to that mark. Works every time for me now.

As for capturing the milky way, make sure your lens is as wide as you can get it. My Rebel lens adjusts from 18mm to 55mm. For milky way shots, I set it to 18mm. That's because the more you zoom in, the less time it takes for star trails to happen.

Take shots with various ISO frames if you can (IE 1600, 3200, 6400), for 15 seconds and longer. Take a LOT of shots. of the same area.

Then snap your lens cover on (disturbing the focus won't mater for this), and take shots at each ISO you used, and each exposure time you used. This is to make "Black Frames" for thermal noise removal.

Once you've done that, down load all your images onto your computer and go through them. Discard any with star trails (or move them out of the way). Then use a program like Deep Space Stacker to stack your frames you took, and use your black frames to remove thermal noise from the images.

This is what I did to get this shots back in August:



ETA: also, 4 minutes will give you star trails always, unless you are using a tracker to adjust the camera with the rotation of the earth. When pointed towards the equator (that would be the south for me) star trails will happen after 15 to 20 seconds. When pointed towards the pole (the north for me), I can get a little bit longer, 20 to 30 seconds, before star trails appear.
Anything longer and you MUST have a device to track the camera with the earth's movement.

You can build a device yourself. Just google Barndoor Tracker.


edit on 27-9-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-9-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-9-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by router404
 


Very nice images and you have some excellent contrast on the moon. I also like your M81/M82 image too. Keep up the good work!

Vince



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:34 AM
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Here's my latest, a composite of comet ISON.

The luminance data comes from 5 minutes of light I recorded with a Planewave 17" CDK telescope on itelescope.net, the color data comes from 26 minutes of light I recorded about an hour and a half earlier with my own Orion ST-80 riding piggyback on the LX200.



posted on Sep, 29 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Here's a composite of the color data used for that image by itself (composited from a stack of the data aligned on the stars and a stack aligned on the comet):




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