Mysterious Hebrew Stone Displayed in Jerusalem

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posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 12:47 PM
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news.yahoo.com...

>>JERUSALEM (AP) — An ancient limestone tablet covered with a mysterious Hebrew text that features the archangel Gabriel is at the center of a new exhibit in Jerusalem, even as scholars continue to argue about what it means.

The so-called Gabriel Stone, a meter (three-foot)-tall tablet said to have been found 13 years ago on the banks of the Dead Sea, features 87 lines of an unknown prophetic text dated as early as the first century BC, at the time of the Second Jewish Temple.

Scholars see it as a portal into the religious ideas circulating in the Holy Land in the era when was Jesus was born. Its form is also unique — it is ink written on stone, not carved

Could be prophetic? The article mentions a time whenduring an attack on Jerusalem God appears with Angels to defend. Plus the mention of Gabriel will also spark a lot of interest. This is one of the oldest passages to mention Gabriel.Of course he is mentioned in the Koran as well. Great mystery!




posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by BlackProjects
 



All agree that the passage describes an apocalyptic vision of an attack on Jerusalem in which God appears with angels on chariots to save the city. The central angelic character is Gabriel, the first angel to appear in the Hebrew Bible. "I am Gabriel," the writing declares.


I'll buy that PPV.



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by BlackProjects
 

Theres quite a few mysterious items on display in izrael:


Not to be outdone, it can also be found at the IRS headquarters in the US:




posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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Found this story elsewhere earlier today.

This stone, etched upon in INK about two thousand years ago, pretty much fulfills one biblical record and proclaims another.

Of course, belief is in the heart and then, finally, after the trumpet



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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How could the ink still be visible after 2,000 years? Wouldn't it have been worn off by now? Unless it was a special kind of ink, I don't see how it could have survived for so long exposed to the elements.

Leave a car sitting out in a field for 50 years and when you come back most of the paint will have rusted/worn away. Now imagine leaving it there for 2,000 years, there probably wouldn't even be a trace of the car left. Very strange in my opinion.

Interesting find, S&F.
edit on 30-4-2013 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 02:27 PM
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Ah well if it's written in Hebrew it must be true.

My interpretation? Israel picks a fight it can't win and whilst in the midst of being pounded back to biblical times the good ol US, full of the power of God (read bull feces), comes to their rescue. Or thereabouts.



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
 




How could the ink still be visible after 2,000 years? Wouldn't it have been worn off by now? Unless it was a special kind of ink, I don't see how it could have survived for so long exposed to the elements.


I questioned how papyrus' could have survived with writing still legible after thousands of years. I have often wondered what our own Declaration of Independence will look like in another millennia. But I set aside those queries to consider the content...

Here we are today this small dot on a speck mixed into a billion specks in a universe filled with a billion more splotches. How did humanity survive itself to reach a point where we uncovered a piece of stone with some ink on it?

I don't know. I confess... I am not that smart. But I am sure that we will never know anything about our past if we discard something simply because it makes no more sense than our very existence.



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by redoubt
 


Not discarding it, just curious.

I could see the ink surviving if it was wrapped up in a cave or something, but if it was found on the banks of the Dead Sea, I don't see how the ink could have possibly survived.

Papyrus wrapped in cloth and put into a cave shields the ink from the elements, which is why it survived, but on the banks of a VERY salty sea? I don't see how that's possible. I may be wrong though.



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by BlackProjects
 




Very interesting. Thanks for the heads-up.

Reading the comments section was nearly as interesting as the article. Honestly I read stuff like that, I get the same impression / feeling I get when I read a lot of threads around here. Some people are really, really, insufferably stupid. Most people are really, really, insufferably arrogant and bull-headed, and egotistical. And my god how much work does this species need before we move toward a more enlightened age, and away from a major and imminent risk of self destruction?


I really, truly hate people sometimes. Much as I love humanity... .I also don't... If you get what I mean.....






posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by threewisemonkeys
 


And its on the internet - so its doubly true



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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I was wondering if it could be traced to any prophecy in the Koran. Maybe a reference to the supernatural protection of Isreal in Ezekiel 38+39 Gog+MaGog War. Just a thought.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by BlackProjects
 

. . . during an attack on Jerusalem God appears with Angels to defend.

This sort of literature may help explain why the Jews were so foolish as to think they could shut the gates of Jerusalem against the Roman legions back in 70 AD, a move that spelt doom for the city and its temple.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 05:31 AM
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Fantastic it mentions the messiah raising after 3 days 100BC



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 06:16 AM
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Originally posted by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
reply to post by redoubt
 
Not discarding it, just curious.
I could see the ink surviving if it was wrapped up in a cave or something, but if it was found on the banks of the Dead Sea, I don't see how the ink could have possibly survived.
Papyrus wrapped in cloth and put into a cave shields the ink from the elements, which is why it survived, but on the banks of a VERY salty sea? I don't see how that's possible. I may be wrong though.


Limestone is porous and is subject to various chemical reactions. It is not a 'hard' stone such as granite. So when 'inked' the liquid containing the black coloration may be absorbed into the stone and during the normal process of evaporation, the coloring pigment is deposited in the stone. And there is a chemical reaction that hardens over time sealing the text into several sub-layers of the stone. In other words, the ink does not merely reside on the surface but is embedded - the pigment hardened into a different chemical state (over time) from when it was in liquid form.


edit on 3-5-2013 by POXUSA because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:24 AM
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I find this very find very exciting and could unite the Jews with Christianity and maybe others but I`m just wishing I guess but it is an awesome find.

here some part of the find.

The tablet consists of two partially-preserved columns of Hebrew text. The first column describes the breaking of evil by righteousness:

3
"By three days you shall know that, thus said the Lord of Hosts, the God of Israel, the evil has been broken by righteousness."

This text is reminiscent of the passage from Daniel, which declares that the Messiah will "make an end of sin, to make atonement for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness."4 The text of Gabriel's Vision goes on to describe the timing of this event as in being "in just a little while":


In just a little while, I will shake the heavens and the earth.

Since the dating of this tablet has been set to the late first century B.C., this "little while" would have been just a few years before the birth of Jesus, described in the Bible as being at the time of king Herod (who died in 4 B.C.).5 The text goes on the make Messianic allusions:


My servant David, ask of Ephraim (that he) place the sign; (this) I ask of you.

At the time of the writing of the Gabriel's vision, David had been dead for 1,000 years, so, obviously, the text does not refer directly to David. However, in the prophetic passages of the Bible (e.g., Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel), the text often refers to "My servant David" as King David's descendant and the Messiah to come.6 According to Jeremiah, the Messiah is the "righteous Branch" of David, who will be known as "The LORD our righteousness,"7 which goes along with the text listed above. Line 80 begins with the phrase "by three days" followed by the word "to live" or "be resurrected" , with the source being the angel "I, Gabriel" . Because of the poor preservation of the text, the object of the command is not clear. However, the next line contains the phrase "prince of princes" . Elsewhere in the prophetic passages of the old testament, Messiah is known as "Prince of Peace."8 Daniel defines Messiah as "Messiah the Prince"9 and makes direct reference to him as the "prince of princes."10 Given the significance of the Messianic nature of the text, and the juxtaposition of "prince of princes" to Gabriel's command, it would not be unreasonable to think that the resurrected one would be the Messiah. So, the likely translation would be "By three days, live, I Gabriel, command you, prince of the princes." Therefore, this stone strongly supports the New Testament's claim that Jesus is the Messiah who died for the sins of the people11 and rose again the third day.12





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