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Most hazardous material on planet leaking at U.S. nuclear site, worker brought to tears over leaking

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posted on May, 1 2013 @ 12:14 AM
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Well, this wasn't a fun thread to read.......


More bad sh*t just on the horizon... I honestly wish we could go a year without a nuclear story with inconceivable consequences... If this true, which is must be, we have a very bleak future to look forward to.

Maybe I'm being a little extreme here, but I wouldn't mind our country rounding up the dipsh*ts who decided to use the cheapest builder to help their company save a little money and then show them what real pain feels like...




posted on May, 1 2013 @ 12:51 AM
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Originally posted by jhn7537
Well, this wasn't a fun thread to read.......


More bad sh*t just on the horizon... I honestly wish we could go a year without a nuclear story with inconceivable consequences... If this true, which is must be, we have a very bleak future to look forward to.

Maybe I'm being a little extreme here, but I wouldn't mind our country rounding up the dipsh*ts who decided to use the cheapest builder to help their company save a little money and then show them what real pain feels like...


one problem most of these people are probably no longer with us.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 01:28 AM
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Not surprised in the least. Civil engineers might as well have been singing to choir about the dilapidation of our infrastructure, because it has fallen on deaf ears. People are getting killed because of it. What happened to the shovel ready jobs? One-trillion-dollars in the last stimulus, and we still have levee failures, bridge collapses, sink holes swallowing up people, and other infrastructure problems. They must be doing it for the children? Furthermore, what has all of our tax dollars gone into if not maintaining our infrastructure? Is that not one of the core duties for the federal government? Move along folks nothing to see here! Tune into channel five, because the President is cracking jokes with Conan O'Brian. Give me a break!
edit on 1-5-2013 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 07:49 AM
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Jakes51, your post reminds me of something that should be talked about here on ATS.

A lot of time, energy, and money is going into "Global Warming" / "Climate Change" when by far the biggest issue facing humanity on an environmental basis is the wholesale break down of water stable aggregates in the soil.

What is happening, and it's painfully obvious in the USA each spring, is the increasing severity of floods.

Did you know that the amount and intensity of precipitation has been declining, yet the frequency and intensity of flooding has been increasing?

This isn't climate change. This is the soil losing the ability to capture and retain moisture.

Mark Vander Meer is a soil scientist who can explain why this is happening far better than I can:
www.youtube.com...

In the video, he gets into the topic right at the beginning and then goes into a whole lot of stuff about forest management. The first 5 mins or so are key.
edit on 1-5-2013 by UnderGetty because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Yeah, I never liked that kind of thing. We're very energy conscious here. Every bulb in the house is CFL and we all have very good habits of not leaving things on. Combo makes our electricity bill a lot less than our neighbors. I was thinking about it a few years back how everything we do that increases our energy pool ends up getting utilized by some new gadget or toy. So many things are electronic now and people use up electricity so needlessly. I don't have a cell phone (which is hilarious because people forget and try to text my home phone lol). Used to have one but gave it up when I realized that I managed without one for the majority of my life. Of course, I'm not working right now due to a serious injury so that will probably have to change when I heal up and start working again. But, being prudent with electricity and consumption in everything is a good thing.

Our local utility offers green energy derived electricity for an additional cost of around 8 cents per kwh. Our electricity bill with this change is still less than most of our neighbors. So yeah, I do put my money where my mouth is--even when I'm not working due to disability. Like I said, we're a low consumption household so it makes it easy to make better choices.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 





Apparently, she points a finger at the sequester that hadn't hit yet.


From what I read, the sequester was going cause a huge cut to the Hanford cleanup fund. If I understand right, there was eventually no funding cut for Hanford.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by tamusan
 


Glad to hear it. Gives me a slight amount of faith that our federal government actually does what to clean up their mess.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


Aww don't give up hope. Maybe the powers will manifest in a few years down the road.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


Of course, I'm not working right now due to a serious injury so that will probably have to change when I heal up and start working again.

Many healing thoughts for you.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 10:42 AM
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Wow...
And the hole goes deeper...



Bonus money trumps safety at Hanford, experts say



"Reporting leaks in high-level waste tanks has been frowned upon at this site for decades," said Bob Alvarez, a former presidential adviser on nuclear policy. “There’s this whole dynamic that is built up where people are totally discouraged from raising concerns, especially those that I call have a show-stopping nature to them, such as leaking high-level radioactive waste tanks.”

Continued at the Source: Article & Video



posted on May, 4 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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Former Governor: Leaking U.S. nuclear site an “underground Chernobyl waiting to happen” (VIDEO)
May 3rd, 2013 at 6:25 pm ET



At :30 in

June 9, 1998

Gary Chittim, KING5 Reporter: They’ve already found cesium in the Columbia River. They’ve already found radioactive material in the Columbia River. So it’s not a question of when that will happen. It’s a question of now that it’s happened, what does that mean.

At 3:15 in

Chittim: If u go back and talk to a lot of the government leaders from this state they were all very frustrated […] Talking to [former Washington Governor] Gary Locke, he called it Chernobyl underground, waiting to happen.


enenews.com...

www.king5.com...



posted on May, 4 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by tamusan
 


The sequester cut is like a single drop in a five gallon bucket. How much would it cost to clean up hanford and have it running properly? 50 million? 100 million?

Maybe we could give up making a dozen or so M1A1 tanks and cover the cost of the cleanup since the army doesn't want them anyway.

Our government cuts all the wrong things.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 06:09 AM
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TV: Leaking Strontium-90 is “boiling the material around it” at U.S. nuclear site — Eating through tank liners (VIDEO)+


At Hanford, the former plutonium production facility located in Eastern Washington, not much takes place without a carefully designed plan. With 56 million gallons of the most highly contaminated nuclear waste on the planet stored in underground tanks at the site, human and environmental health depend on the precise work of Hanford employees and their strict adherence to written procedures.



www.king5.com...

enenews.com...



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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itd be interesting to build an interactive map of ongoing events like this, one that would show current spills or meltdowns, or even passed, then we could pick a good spot to move to, if theres any left that is.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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Nuclear Power Falters, Engulfed by 'Cauldron' of Bad Luck

CNBC.com: Published: Monday, 13 May 2013 | 8:57 AM ET


Once touted as a successor, or at least a competitor, to carbon-based power, the nuclear sector has taken a beating as the momentum behind new projects stalls and enthusiasm for domestic fossil fuel production grows.

Across the country, plans to build nuclear plants have hit roadblocks recently—a sharp turn for a sector that just a few years ago was looking forward to a renaissance. These developments come as energy policy becomes increasingly focused on oil and gas.

The change in nuclear's fortunes is staggering, given that the U.S. is the world's largest producer of nuclear power, according to the World Nuclear Association. The country's 104 reactors account for more than 30 percent of nuclear electricity generation worldwide.

"Starting about four years ago, the industry felt it was in the middle of a renaissance" with applications for many new plants pending with the NRC, said Peter Bradford, a law professor and a former member of the commission. "They've gone from that high-water mark to a point at which … we're actually seeing the closing of a few operating plants,which was unthinkable even a few years ago."


www.cnbc.com...



“Mass release of floating radioactive particles in metro St. Louis” possible from inferno at landfill? Fire “smells like dead bodies” — 8,700 tons of nuclear waste nearby

www.rollingstone.com...


An underground landfill fire near tons of nuclear waste raises serious health and safety concerns – so why isn’t the government doing more to help?

[...] It’s invisible to area residents, buried deep beneath the ground in a North St. Louis County landfill. [...] “It smells like dead bodies,” observes another local.

[...] “Am I going to end up with cancer 20 years down the road?” [...]

The Bridgeton landfill fire is burning close to at least 8,700 tons of nuclear weapons wastes. [...]

About 1,200 feet south of the radioactive EPA site, the fire at Bridgeton Landfill spreads out like hot barbeque coals. No one knows for sure what happens when an underground inferno meets a pool of atomic waste, but residents aren’t eager to find out. [...]

At a March 15th press conference, Peter Anderson – an economist who has studied landfills for over 20 years – raised the worst-case scenario of a “dirty bomb,” meaning a non-detonated, mass release of floating radioactive particles in metro St. Louis. “Now, to be clear, a dirty bomb is not nuclear fission, it’s not an atomic bomb, it’s not a weapon of mass destruction,” Anderson assured meeting attendants in Bridgeton’s Machinists Union Hall. “But the dispersal of that radioactive material in air that could reach – depending upon weather conditions – as far as 10 miles from the site could make it impossible to have economic activity continue.” [...]

Robert Criss, a geochemist at Washington University in St. Louis who has studied the issue closely, says the EPA is grossly underplaying a host of risks surrounding West Lake – flooding, earthquakes, liquefaction, groundwater leaching – that could pave the way for a public health crisis. That’s not to mention the recent development of an underground fire nearby. Says Criss, “There is no geological site I can think of that is more absurd to place such waste.” [...]


enenews.com... ons-of-nuclear-waste-nearby-fire-smells-like-dead-bodies
edit on 13-5-2013 by MariaLida because: (no reason given)





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