It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What Books really rock/shock your world?

page: 6
40
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 1 2013 @ 08:18 PM
link   
reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 

I loved Swan Song. It was more spiritual than The Stand, and less predictable.

My number one of all time (and I don't even have a hard copy of it) is

His Dark Materials, by Philip Pullman. Unabridged, on CD, from Chivers Audio, with excellent voice acting and sound effects. Done in the radio play tradition, it's a LONG listen, but worth every minute. Except for the parts where Roger bleats relentlessly, "Lyra! Lyra!". That's only a few minutes total, so it doesn't take away too much.

I've even had a semilucid dream wherein I found "The Subtle Knife" itself, and, not to spoil it for anyone, I did what only that knife can do. I got so excited i woke up




posted on May, 1 2013 @ 10:18 PM
link   
Hyperion Cantos. It's a four book series by Dan Simmons. I've often thought of being some fort of writer as I was growing up, thinking, or hoping, that I might have something to add to history. Occasionaly I have encountered an author who has caused me to rethink that decision and doubt whether I could produce anything that would ever be considered great. I begin to think that whatever I could do has already been done better or as good as it could already possibly be. This series was one that did that to me. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, wow. It won awards, if that matters. A Hugo award was one and I can't remember the other(s)... It's must read sci-fi as far as I'm concerned. Right up there with Snowcrash. I wish I had more time for reading. If I was immortal I would try to learn every language and read every book.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 10:18 PM
link   
Hyperion Cantos. It's a four book series by Dan Simmons. I've often thought of being a writer as I was growing up, thinking, or hoping, that I might have something to add to history. Occasionaly I have encountered an author who has caused me to rethink that decision and doubt whether I could produce anything that would ever be considered great. I begin to think that whatever I could do has already been done better or as good as it could already possibly be. This series was one that did that to me. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, wow. It won awards, if that matters. A Hugo award was one and I can't remember the other(s)... It's must read sci-fi as far as I'm concerned. Right up there with Snowcrash. I wish I had more time for reading. If I was immortal I would try to learn every language and read every book.
edit on 5/1/2013 by 3n19m470 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 10:37 PM
link   
Sophie's Choice by William Styron. That book will stick with you.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 06:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by 3n19m470
Hyperion Cantos. It's a four book series by Dan Simmons. I've often thought of being a writer as I was growing up, thinking, or hoping, that I might have something to add to history. Occasionaly I have encountered an author who has caused me to rethink that decision and doubt whether I could produce anything that would ever be considered great. I begin to think that whatever I could do has already been done better or as good as it could already possibly be. This series was one that did that to me. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, wow. It won awards, if that matters. A Hugo award was one and I can't remember the other(s)... It's must read sci-fi as far as I'm concerned. Right up there with Snowcrash. I wish I had more time for reading. If I was immortal I would try to learn every language and read every book.
edit on 5/1/2013 by 3n19m470 because: (no reason given)


Dan Simmons is an exceptional writer. I especially love his Summer of Night and Children of the Night.

In Children of the Night, he manages to concoct a medical rational for vampirism and its an amazing read.

He also wrote a historical novel about Wilkie Collins and Charles Dickens called Drood. In this story, he portrays Wilkie Collins (a famous author credited with writing the first mystery novel) and skillfully blends history and fantasy to create an intriguing tale about the Charles Dicken's character Drood.

Both of these were great reads.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 02:05 PM
link   
I am so thankful for all these book recommendations,almost every unread one I have on my list now.
Thank you all so much,I knew there would be some excellent stuff which I have not even heard of from the esteemed and diverse folks of ATS.

However,we have now progressed beyond my book shelf capacity,so I shall be building a new bookcase to accomodate all the books from this thread.

I shall call it my ATS bookcase,and it will be tall and wide,and inscribed with the ATS logo if all goes to plan.
When it does,I shall take pics.

Thanks again all.




posted on May, 2 2013 @ 04:35 PM
link   
reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


Having just read your signature thread about Iain M Banks...
He is one of the most challenging science fiction writers that I have read...Feersum Ennjin, Consider Phlebas and Use of Weapons...to name a few off the top of my head. Also love some of his work without the 'M'. The Wasp Factory is wonderfully deep and dark.

A truly original and gifted writer, if sometimes a little hard to follow, seems only fair to give him mention here too. And Excession, in particular, did, kind of, rock my world.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 06:32 AM
link   



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 06:35 PM
link   
Swan Song most definitely. Unbelievably great storyline with memorable characters.

The Time Machine, by HG Wells, short and sweet but very engaging, I couldn't put it down and read it all in a couple hours, lol. Very imaginative.

Stephen Kings Under The Dome. Its King so its drawn out at times but I loved it anyway. The storyline was so bizarre no one really understanding fully what's going on till close to the end. King writes bad guys like no one else though and this one (well technically there were several) was King's best yet. I became so enraged at the villain at times but man oh man he was written so well. The ending surprised me too.

Orwell's 1984 is number one for me. Because of it I take a lot less for granted, freedom to love, to write, to think however I chose to, it just moves me. Scary that it now seems to be a prediction and not just a story.



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 06:44 PM
link   
reply to post by galadofwarthethird
 




never finished reading like the gunslinger series by Stephen King


hi, i haven't got the words to describe how much the Gunslinger series opened up my mind,

how far did you get in the series?



posted on May, 4 2013 @ 03:16 PM
link   
reply to post by Minnie1985
 

I am not sure I think I read like 2, or I got a bit into the 3rd book or so, that was years ago though. If I was going to start re-reading the books I would probably have to start at the beginning with book one, as I pretty much forgot most of it. Though right now in my life I am not so much into the reading, if I ran into this thread about 17 years ago I would probably be all over this thread. Now a days I only read once in a while, and mostly its just to chill out, and usually some fantasy or adventure book. So ya I was planing or finishing reading the series, but that is what I said like 5 years ago.
I totally will do it sometime this year. Not holding my breath on that though.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:16 AM
link   
The Stand by Stephen King

Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:01 AM
link   
Just out of interest Smylee

Have you read The little prince ?

It's great to read to kids.

Even better to read as an adult.


Few stories are as widely read and as universally cherished by children and adults alike as The Little Prince. Richard Howard's new translation of the beloved classic-published to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's birth-beautifully reflects Saint-Exupéry's unique and gifted style. Howard, an acclaimed poet and one of the preeminent translators of our time, has excelled in bringing the English text as close as possible to the French, in language, style, and most important, spirit. The artwork in this new edition has been restored to match in detail and in color Saint-Exupéry's original artwork. By combining the new translation with restored original art, Harcourt is proud to introduce the definitive English-language edition of


Read about it here

Cody



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 01:38 PM
link   
reply to post by cody599
 


The little prince is a classic book Cody,My dad read it to me as a kid,and it has always stayed with me.
I highly reccomend reading it to any youngsters-its a great intro to Sci Fi I think.

edit on 9/5/2013 by Silcone Synapse because: sp



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 04:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by cody599
Just out of interest Smylee

Have you read The little prince ?

It's great to read to kids.

Even better to read as an adult.


Few stories are as widely read and as universally cherished by children and adults alike as The Little Prince. Richard Howard's new translation of the beloved classic-published to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's birth-beautifully reflects Saint-Exupéry's unique and gifted style. Howard, an acclaimed poet and one of the preeminent translators of our time, has excelled in bringing the English text as close as possible to the French, in language, style, and most important, spirit. The artwork in this new edition has been restored to match in detail and in color Saint-Exupéry's original artwork. By combining the new translation with restored original art, Harcourt is proud to introduce the definitive English-language edition of


Read about it here

Cody


Not yet, but it's now on the list.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 06:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


Well, I always have three authors that I can't put down, and that makes you think.

If you like (like me) how a fantastic utopia world would be, I would counsel all novels from J.R.R. Tolkien. His world is so believable, so rich in mythologies and legends, that you actually wish it could have existed.

But for more mind-opening books, I counsel Micheal Crichton (especially "State of Fear", and "The Rising Sun"; they're really making you think) and Isaac Asimov (the Seldon's plan, and the first 2 Robotic Laws could really help humanity, but it also gives a clue on what the Elite government might do when they'll conquer planets [the Terrans stuck on Earth vs the Spacers that have all planets to themselves]).

Oh, and yes, The Little Prince too. So much thought-provoking about how we lose our fun side when we grow up.

Those four authors are really my top favourites.

edit on 9-5-2013 by starheart because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:32 AM
link   
reply to post by starheart
 


Hey StarHeart,you have good taste in authors!
I love Tolkien,and I even have a rareish copy of the Silmarillion with large fold out maps.
I also loved State of Fear and many other Micheal Critchton books.Prey was great.
And I have love Asimov since I was a kid,and those robot laws of his are now being taken seriously by the (non military)robot builders of today.





posted on May, 16 2013 @ 12:32 PM
link   
I have to add another amazing read,this guy is fast becoming my all time most influential author...but as I read more of his work,I am more saddened that such a great mind has left our world.

Gary Jennings is that author,and this time the book is "The Journeyer"



www.amazon.co.uk...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368724197&sr=8-1&keywords=the+journeyer

This book,(like "Aztec"by the same author which I wrote a warning about in my OP)has infiltrated my dreams most nights over the last couple of weeks.
So far however,no waking up screaming has occured(as with Aztec)-that is not to say this book is in anyway timid.
It is an incredible tale of the travels of Marco Polo,of venice in the 1200's.
Gary Jennings just has this way of making you feel as though YOU are living through the experiences he writes about,and him being a top historian and researcher just adds to the realistic feel.
What a read-although not for kids or the faint of heart-some parts will make you want to cheer,laugh,cry,scream,vomit...but not usually all at the same time.
It is a sometimes beautiful,crazy,awe inspiring,depraved,shocking read,but after reading it I feel actually knew Marco Polo...He now resides in my head,along with Mixtli from the Aztec book,in a form almost indistingishable from true,real friends...Sounds crazy yes?

I read a heck of lot of books but I have never had such an effect from books before reading Gary Jennings,which makes it all the worse that he has passed.
I have one other of his books,Raptor about a goth in roman times-but I am not sure if I should read it now,in case anything mad happens to me/the world-or save it for as long as I can...Hmmm screw it,I am going to start it now,just in case.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 09:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
reply to post by starheart
 


Hey StarHeart,you have good taste in authors!
I love Tolkien,and I even have a rareish copy of the Silmarillion with large fold out maps.
I also loved State of Fear and many other Micheal Critchton books.Prey was great.
And I have love Asimov since I was a kid,and those robot laws of his are now being taken seriously by the (non military)robot builders of today.





Ooh, your Silmarillion had the maps included!! Cool! But thank you; these three authors always comfort me. Tolkien makes me dream (if only I could find his other novels related to Middle-Earth, like his 12 books on Middle-Earth history... some were about tales untold in Silmarillion, The Hobbit, or LOTR), Crichton makes some pretty thought-provoking novels (I'm glad to see you read State of Fear! It made me wonder if GW wasn't just a big prank to subdue humans, and with more and more evidences coming up, I'm truly grateful that Crichton had the gut to put the debate in a novel), and Asimov is a mix of Crichton and Tolkien, but in the future and with robots! The "Bicentennial Man" was a beautiful story.
I was glad when the robot builders decided to put the Four Laws in their robots. They're such important laws, even for humans. If only everyone will obey the first two laws: "Don't harm or bring to harm humanity", and "Don't harm or bring to harm humans"....



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by Minnie1985
reply to post by galadofwarthethird
 




never finished reading like the gunslinger series by Stephen King


hi, i haven't got the words to describe how much the Gunslinger series opened up my mind,

how far did you get in the series?




I'm really surprised that I haven't seen more people say "The Gunslinger" I'd have to say the series is by far, hands down the best series I've ever read. I started it in late July and finished in early October. I worked a full time job and took care of a family to. I threw the book and also a tantrum when I read the last words. I also felt SSSOOOOOO stupid. Eyes of a Dragon is a good read to.

Cell runs a very close second. I was talking to a girl at work about Cell, and she started saying how the movie was better. I raised an eyebrow, and asked her the one with J-lo??? She said yes, and I told her she needs to read the book, cuz the movie is not based on the book....at all, two totally different things. Kinda like the time I had someone tell me they wish Spinal Tap would get back together...

Anything from Michael Crichton. Pirates Latitudes, and Timeline both are awesome.

Robin Cook, if you can understand hospital jargon.
John Grisham



new topics

top topics



 
40
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join