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Spectacular 12 Month Composite Image of Our Sun over the Last Year ! Notice Anything Odd?

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posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by flexy123
 


Actually, i do but nice try.


Sorry, but SOHO offered me no Composite Image of our sun in 1996.

I guess it can be stated that i see relationships that others cannot. Hmmm.....

BTW, this image is also impressive. A triangle?

edit on 29-4-2013 by TauCetixeta because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


Coronal Holes are:


Coronal holes are areas where the Sun's corona is darker, and colder, and has lower-density plasma than average. These were found when X-ray telescopes in the Skylab mission were flown above the Earth's atmosphere to reveal the structure of the corona. Coronal holes are linked to unipolar concentrations of open magnetic field lines. During solar minimum, coronal holes are mainly found at the Sun's polar regions, but they can be located anywhere on the sun during solar maximum. The fast-moving component of the solar wind is known to travel along open magnetic field lines that pass through coronal holes.


In other words, they are holes in the sun's "atmosphere".

a LOT like the "holes" in our atmosphere between our clouds:



Think of the clouds as dense plasma, and places where there are no clouds as thin or holes in the plasma.

It's the same with the sun. The corona is the sun's atmosphere and is best seen in ultraviolet spectrum. Hence why the areas that are open look dark or black. What you are actually seeing is the surface of the sun (not an actual Hole) that looks black because the SDO camera filter is not letting that light through. Only the designated frequency of light.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Space Weather.com appears to keep an eye on all coronal holes everyday.

Lower Left Side of their webpage.

They also let us know when the coronal hole solar wind will hit the Earth.


Coronal Holes: Wikipedia

Gazing at sun spots has been downright boring.


We can't find any. When we do, they are tiny.
edit on 29-4-2013 by TauCetixeta because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-4-2013 by TauCetixeta because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by TauCetixeta
Sorry, but SOHO offered me no Composite Image of our sun in 1996.

So you thought it would therefore be ok to try to compare it to a single image from 1996? How is that supposed to be relevant or a fair comparison? Is it somehow relevant simply because you weren't spoon-fed a composite image from 1996 which, I might add, was during a solar minimum? What prevented you from making your own composite image from 1996? Was it just too much work for you? Why post a single image then?


I guess it can be stated that i see relationships that others cannot. Hmmm.....

Actually I think it can be better stated that you don't understand critical differences in the things you presented. A composite image from a solar maximum, even a weak maximum, is nothing at all like a single image from solar minimum. Apples and oranges doesn't even begin to cover it.
edit on 29-4-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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Of course we didn't see Sun like that 5 years ago. We didn't have SDO. SOHO doesn't take HD pictures, SDO does. SDO has 4 times greater resolution than SOHO, and twice the resolution of STEREO.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by TauCetixeta
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Space Weather.com appears to keep an eye on all coronal holes everyday.

Lower Left Side of their webpage.

They also let us know when the coronal hole solar wind will hit the Earth.


Coronal Holes: Wikipedia

Gazing at sun spots has been downright boring.


We can't find any. When we do, they are tiny.
edit on 29-4-2013 by TauCetixeta because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-4-2013 by TauCetixeta because: (no reason given)


Most of us know about SW.com and the rest...believe it or not!
BTW, your version of of 'tiny' is very different than mine. Anyway, I guess somebody, (not me) has answered your OP, it would be nice to acknowledge that.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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For avid sun watchers, who want to get there own up too date views of of sun you can check out these links

SDO

Solar Terrestrial Activity report

these two show sunspots and coronal holes

SOHO

with the soho you can get views of the sun or use the Lasco to see Solar Flares and CME's leave the sun

Sunspots Classification and magnetics

will give you the magnetic complexity of the spots that are earth facing (BetaGamma and such)

And for good measure this one gives you all the meat and potatos

SolarIMG

Has a mash up of the ones above as well as several other resources for and interested solar viewer.

Cheers and enjoy when I first found the sites I was lost in them for days just checking out stuff I have never seen

Just felt providing links would help everyone understand what we are looking at and get a better grasp of the sun itself plenty of reading and viewing for all



SaneThinking



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


The Solar Wind is always hitting the Earth.

It varies in speed and density.

It is thought that coronal holes increase the solar wind's density.

But the fact remains, the solar wind is always there.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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Has anyone notice that it looks like a Pokemon ball?

Its a spectacular and so deadly.

Just my two cents.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by Vasa Croe
Very cool pic. Nice band of activity around the center and very smooth on the top and bottom. Whats up with that?


That's natural. There's actually a 11-year cycle of solar activity, and the sunspots usually appear in one of two latitude bands:

www.oneminuteastronomer.com...



There's also the Gleisberg Cycle
solarphysics.livingreviews.org...

And Sporer's law. My guess it's something to do with convection currents.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 



Originally posted by ngchunter

That's a basic feature of the sunspot cycle. Sunspots (which will correlate with areas of activity like this) start out at higher latitudes early in the sunspot cycle and migrate towards the equator later in the cycle near the maximum.


. As the cycle progresses the number of spots increases and they tend to be formed at lower latitudes toward the equator.

www.enotes.com...

How can 'Higher/Lower' be determined, when there is no 'Up' nor 'Down'?



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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This thread is being closed pending the OPs ability to post his claims/observations.
 


As the member has not replied to our request, this thread is permanently closed.

edit on Sat May 4 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)





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