Earliest evidence of lasting "modern" behaviour at 44kya, Earliest use of Beeswax & Ricin!

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posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Very interesting and enjoyed reading that information. The lump of beeswax, with grooves in it reminded me of the blocks of wax my father used as a Saddler. Several fine threads are twisted together and waxed to create a stronger thread for stitching. Back then, I used the same string waxing method to create twine for my bow.




posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by Druid42
reply to post by skalla
 


A great read, very informative. I was reading some other comments you left in a Gobleki Tepe Animal thread earlier, and you act very professional. Even here. Kudos.


thank you, i'm glad you enjoyed it... i'm only professional at times tho(....)



Bad news: You need to work on your grammar a bit. A lot of your sentences aren't capitalized at the beginning, and you really like to add more than the one necessary period at the end of sentences. IMHO, it really detracts from the professionalism you apparently wish to display. As a grammar nazi, I query myself why someone with so much knowledge would be so sloppy on grammar. Have they never wrote a thesis before? What gives? Do we toss grammar out the window just because it's an internet forum? You may want to link this information later, so why not keep it ship-shape?


while i find it hard to disagree with some of what you say, it's all relative as far as i'm concerned.. sometimes when i post i look back at the "..."'s and do sometimes think "ouch, how many times do i do that?" and wince a little, but they are not so much the end of a sentence as just the flow in a train of thought.

having spent a long time in higher education and private study, really struggling through elements of it due to some atypical neurological traits (etc) that i have, i have long ceased to care about the p's and q's as such and that (imo) pedantic approach when posting on the internet.

i'm not writing academic papers here, i'm chatting to people and sharing stuff- your approach may well be different, and vive la difference i say. perhaps it is a reflection on my subject matter and elements of the presentation or analysis that makes you want to expect more, but i in no means view what i do here as highbrow for example, or particularly credit worthy - i have obvs written far longer, more formal and deeply analytical works on many subjects, not just archaeology or primitive skills. i'm happy not to do that anymore, and have always been far happier at a campfire messing with sticks, rocks and knives (etc), than at a keyboard.

i like to relax at ats, have a bit of fun, and the writing of the odd thread is really a thing i do to stop me feeling like a taker here - discussions with informed folk is a bonus.. as is the possiblilty to broaden a few other folks horizons...

i dont normally respond to grammar fairies, and i live in a part of the world where grammar is your father's mother rather than something to be observed when writing, but you at least put some effort into your attempt at fascistic behaviour so i thought i would reply in kind
...of course you saw the numerous mistakes in your own effort
like i said, it's all relative.

i'm honestly not trying to show professionalism either, i just turn up here and be myself - sometimes i take the mickey or act sarcastic, disdainful and borderline rude. sometimes i'm insightful and contribute time and research to other's threads, other times i tackle prejudice or misinfo. if you are interested you can ofc view my posts and threads, but i'm never anything here but myself.

a bit of a ramble from me, but i like to talk about myself sometimes, i find it quite therapeutic and thats always a good thing.

ETA: re your comments on the beeswax, i can only assume that it is wild due to it being the earliest evidenced use. my primitive/stone age skills knowledge is by no means all encompassing but exploitation of is wax something i will certainly be looking for info on when i get a chance and a window in my intellectual meanderings opens up. if there is any evidence of the bees being domesticated in some way then i feel it would be a huge find, though i wouldnt hold my breath.
these people however, would surely be used to studying animal behaviour - as hunters and gatherers such skills are fundamental and honey was used as a food source long long before this, be that by hominids or other creatures. i expect that accident and play led to the discovery of the properties of beeswax. i feel that play is much underestimated as a facilitator of ancient innovation.

reply to post by LexiconV
 


that is a truely awesome perspective, when i get a chance i'm gonna look into the possibility that the fibes would make goodbowstrings - i know a few bowmakers and my making my own bow is high on my mahoosive "to-do" list.. thanks for the contribution
edit on 30-4-2013 by skalla because: (no reason given)
edit on 30-4-2013 by skalla because: iffy spelling



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Thanks for the response, as I now see where you are coming from. I suppose I needn't be so critical. Apology offered if required.

I've been researching Gobleki Tepe, and stringing together migration routes of early hominids, so this thread was another link in the puzzle. Again, very insightful presentation.



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Druid42
reply to post by skalla
 


Thanks for the response, as I now see where you are coming from. I suppose I needn't be so critical. Apology offered if required.

I've been researching Gobleki Tepe, and stringing together migration routes of early hominids, so this thread was another link in the puzzle. Again, very insightful presentation.


Hi Druid you may want to take a look see of this thread it may help you in your quest.
Who Were The People Of Göbekli Tepe
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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Very interesting!

And I suppose it makes sense. My understanding (someone correct me if I'm wrong) is that homo sapiens' cognitive abilities have been more or less what they are today for at least 40,000 years, if not longer. It is only our experience with tools, the complexity of those tools, and the complexity of thought that have increased. The raw average intellectual capacity of our species, unless I'm mistaken, is believed by scientists to have been what it is today since around the time the behavior described in this topic took root.

Perhaps that time will be pushed back even further with new discoveries?

Peace.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by AceWombat04
 


i entirely agree, it's just that we face different challenges nowadays... this reminds me of a cartoon from a book i have on knapping, showing the equation neccessary to produce a knapped stone tool:



balancing angles, forces, friction, structural integrity, weight.. as well as planning ahead and setting up platforms for further flake removal, keeping aesthetics and erognomics in mind. it's prehistoric rocket-science!



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Snapshots of the past.

I think ancient knowledge of handwork or ornament making never really went away,

Like the wheel or the knife or the spoon, many objects are the result of common sense,

so over time various cultures will develop similarly in their stonework or carving skills

and not always in any kind of logical chronological progression.

Science and history are consensus driven, so it's hard to know anything exactly.

How much can we really tell about our cultural development by digging a hole here and there?


skills

Skills like ornament- or knifemaking and spooncarving will always

pop up here and there without any sense of contemorary cultural belonging.

My best friend is a toolmaker and essentially does what Ug was doing thousands of years ago.

Yet toolmaking as we know it now only exists since the industrial revolution.

I found an interesting thread about spoonmaking Here


Biology

Biologically, we still are those cavemen, fishermen and hunter-gatherers.

That's why these skills will never truly die out, only ebb and flow as times change.

We all have the ability, but how many have used it to create something?


Vraitink ze vourds Richtig.

As for your grammer, I got my handwriting analysed once and I was told

that writing a small "i" for "I" means that you have a low self-esteem.

The way that you show your character through your posts means that you shouldn't have,

so change that.

I like doing the "..." as well, so I think that's fine.

Remember your commas and capitals and you'll be O,k.

Tfw.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by Theflyingweldsman
 


Ja Wohl, Oberweldsman! o7

and thanks for the link to a rather fabulous thread by an outstanding craftsperson



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Everything is cyclic.

The same trends have come and gone over thousands or even millions of years..

Scientists discover headbutting dinosaur





BBC Link


edit on 11/5/2013 by Theflyingweldsman because: dino pic



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by Theflyingweldsman
 


caves.

australopithecus, monkeypoop and string made from bark
edit on 11-5-2013 by skalla because: "on topic"



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


While some hunted, others gathered

edit on 11/5/2013 by Theflyingweldsman because: Caveman on topic pic



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Theflyingweldsman
 


paleolithic, mumble... blah twigs, aurochs and stuff, useful for hunting. castor oil and beeswax and #
edit on 11-5-2013 by skalla because: on topic


eta: moved to appropriate thread etc
edit on 11-5-2013 by skalla because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-5-2013 by skalla because: always mis-spell useful





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