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The first all-plastic 3D-printed gun will be available to download in ‘two weeks’

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posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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Hi

Sry if this has been posted I did not see it

Wow Defense Distributed,says they are just two weeks away from 3D printing an entire handgun, out of ABS plastic

When they have printed the gun and ensured that it works, the weapon’s 3D model files will be uploaded to the internet and open sourced so that you and I can print an almost-undetectable firearm

They are calling it "the Wiki weapon" and will probably be just one metal part, the firing pin, while the rest, including the barrel will be made out of plastic

A virtually undetecable handgun is probably gonna be a problem and they are really skirting the law,but wow I can just imagine how many of these are gonna get printed up
www.extremetech.com...

Cody Wilson, the founder of Defense Distributed, says he is just two weeks away from 3D printing an entire handgun, out of ABS plastic. Once Wilson has printed the gun and ensured that it works, the weapon’s 3D model files will be uploaded to the internet and open sourced — so that you and I can print an almost-undetectable firearm.

Creating a 3D-printed gun, and contributing the model files to the public domain, is the culmination of DefDist’s Wiki Weapon project. The Wiki Weapon project was created in mid-2012 by Cody Wilson, with the lofty but perhaps slightly misguided goal of fulfilling every American citizen’s Second Amendment right to bear arms. Back in July 2012, DefDist produced a 3D-printed a lower receiver for an AR-15 rifle, in January of this year it 3D-printed a 30-round AR-15 magazine (video below), and then in March DefDist finally received its federal firearms license, which is required to legally make and sell guns. Now, it seems, according to an interview with Mashable, Wilson is almost ready to release an entirely 3D-printed handgun.






edit on 28-4-2013 by goou111 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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Well this will just make new laws, won't it ?

I mean, right now I can go see a doctor and get a prescription for something..

Or I can mix a batch of it up in the back yard.

One is legal, the other not quite so.

I don't see much difference. You can't manufacture restricted drugs, and can be arrested with intent if you're caught with precursor chemicals and a copy of the instructions from erowid. I'm guessing if someone is caught with a schematic for a printable gun and a load of 3d printable plastic.. they'll soon tie up that loop hole.

Obviously the information for anything you want is out there so making the information illegal will be a pointless endeavour - but no doubt they'll try. But being caught with the intent? Now they're just waiting for this to happen.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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It is cheaper to buy a gun on the street than printing one. It cost more money to buy the printer than anyone who would try to bypass any security would have to spend. It would be cheaper to pay off someone to let you through any metal detector. It doesn't cost much for someone to let you through.
edit on 4/28/2013 by catt3 because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/28/2013 by catt3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 


Yes I think this will bring alot of new laws..

When 3-d printers become household items we are gonna have guns printed everywhere, hell if i had 3-printer I would be the 1st one tp print one up



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by catt3
It is cheaper to buy a gun on the street than printing one. It cost more money to buy the printer than anyone who would try to bypass any security would have to spend. It would be cheaper to pay off someone to let you through any metal detector. It doesn't cost much for someone to let you through.
edit on 4/28/2013 by catt3 because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/28/2013 by catt3 because: (no reason given)


I really think eventually 3-d printers will be everywhere



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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So, why doesn't homeland security just erase these sites that allow anyone to make a weapon. They could get rid of all the links that show people how to make bombs also. Information on printing a handgun could give every criminal a throw away gun. Information on how to build a pressure cooker bomb doesn't need to be on the net. I think Homeland Security is letting these things balloon so they can use this stuff as precedence to shut down all the controversial sites in the near future. They could erase these dangerous sites, kids will be printing guns.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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This was bound to happen sooner or latter...Pretty cool in my opinion. However I find it really hard to believe the firing pin is the only metal part. With extreme pressures, heat, and rifling needed for any kind of accuracy, a steel barrel is needed.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by highfreq
 

You don't need accuracy at 5 feet.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 


I doubt it will lead to too many new laws. I'm pretty sure that building your own firearm is already illegal, and has been since at least the late 1960s. Here is a snippet from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Firearms FAQ:


Q: Does the GCA prohibit anyone from making a handgun, shotgun or rifle?

With certain exceptions a firearm may be made by a non-licensee provided it is not for sale and the maker is not prohibited from possessing firearms. However, a person is prohibited from assembling a non-sporting semi-automatic rifle or non-sporting shotgun from imported parts. In addition, the making of an NFA firearm requires a tax payment and approval by ATF. An application to make a machine gun will not be approved unless documentation is submitted showing that the firearm is being made for a Federal or State agency.

[18 U.S.C. 922(o) and (r), 26 U.S.C. 5822, 27 CFR 478.39, 479.62 and 479.105]


You can read the specific legislature by searching through the Cornell University Law School Legal Information Institute for the specific U.S.C.'s that are listed.

The plans to build firearms at home are already out there in the public domain and have been for years, mostly under the guise of an "educational resource." They do make for an interesting read though. Much of them you can do with parts from hardware stores, a lathe, and a milling machine. They range from the incredibly simple to the incredibly sophisticated. Anyone can buy any of those items and, in theory, build their own firearm.

I would never do it or advocate that anyone do it. I especially wouldn't even trust a plastic barrel. There is quite a bit of force involved when the primer ignites and the gasses expand. I would be too afraid it would blow up in my face and cause grievous bodily harm.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by catt3
 


5 feet is more or less point blank range..so unless you plan on shooting one like an assassin and throwing the barrel away the gun is worthless. The heat alone from one shot would melt and distort the barrel..... And if you are ever in a situation where you need to point a loaded gun at someone, your gonna want to be a little further away than 5 feet.
Trust me on this...



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Don't forget that a lot of the instructions are not on the internet. I've seen copies of printed manuscripts from the 1970s and more recent telling people how to build these things. The information exchange will happen if someone wants to find out the answers bad enough. Blocking websites will make it slightly more difficult to obtain the information, but it won't prevent a deranged person from getting their hands on it or even developing their own techniques.
edit on 4/28/2013 by cmdrkeenkid because: Removed list of titles of manuscripts. No need to give stupid people a starting point stupid ideas.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
So, why doesn't homeland security just erase these sites that allow anyone to make a weapon. They could get rid of all the links that show people how to make bombs also.

Because it's next to impossible to control user generated content in an environment as big as the internet I imagine. Is like fighting a hydra.

Technically speaking though, this isn't that different from home made weapons made using other means as others have said. I wonder sometimes if they might require larger 3D printers to need licenses or permissions though in the claim that it's to guard copyright / public safety.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by Pinke
 


Most schematics for 3D printers and their projects are open source, so there is no copyright associated to much with them. Sure, you can buy a machine that has been mostly put together, or you can just as easily build a RepRap yourself.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Great find OP.

Now that it is possible to "print" any type of firearm, the only thing that is missing now is the ability to assemble atoms into molecules to form gun powder in a printable fashion.

But I know when the printable molecular printers start becoming regulated , people will just print very effective rail guns.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 02:58 AM
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edit on 4/29/13 by SmoothRhythm because: Accidental Post, My mobile phone went haywire



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:35 AM
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In reality, I'm not sure how this is much different than what you can do in a well stocked workshop/garage right now. $25 in parts will give me what I need to make a 'bang stick' which is little more than a modified pipe with a firing mechanism behind a 12 gauge shotgun shell. A variant is marketed as a defense against sharks and other threats in the water.

Of course, the issue is the same on both. I'd be guilty of a federal felony crime the moment I finished making my bang stick, for merely possessing it. Anyone can have directions to almost any type of contraption ..and I have a book somewhere around here (Starts with FM-
) which shows all the detail anyone could want or need for Vietnam War era booby traps and IED's. It's interesting for reference to a war I've spent years trying to understand for personal reasons. Nothing wrong with printed material ..and the Courts have ruled in favor of that, time and time again.

You'll just get years to consider the difference between instruction and production if anyone goes and uses them.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 03:49 AM
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reply to post by goou111
 


This is a solution that makes control issues moot, but we can produce a functional venus weapon with 3-5 foot effective range and would like to extend the distance

We have a handheld laser that gives 12-15 foot effective range, but the venus weapon provides the best universal defense their is, and can disrupt the mental and motor faculties of a 250 pound man

This is the real solution and open to the entire world



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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I'll save the file in the case I can ever afford a 3d printer.



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


TM 31-210 is my best friend



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 09:10 AM
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Funny how we humans always use new technology for producing tools for destruction









 
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