Spreading Now on the Web,When even the squirrels avoid GMO corn We should probably listen.

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posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by DirtyD

Originally posted by Ghost375
So the squirrel started with the non-GMO corn, finished it, moved onto the GMO one and realized he was full?
Did a squirrel die midway through eating the GMO corn? no?
ok, then get your anti-science propaganda out of here.
That picture is still purely propaganda. Just because it coincides with your viewpoint, however ill-informed, doesn't mean it's not propaganda.


Yeah, never mind all that scientific evidence linking GMO's to myriads of health problems, and the exploding cancer rates in the USA. Keep eating your GMO's, see how that works out for you.

I've taken a look at that "evidence" and I've seen nothing conclusive. And I have seen absolutely no mechanism for how they could possibly cause the things people claim it causes. People are just scared of the word. When you actually know what GM really is, you realize it's not as scary as people make it out to be.

Also, you do know that pretty much all the food is genetically modified in some way, right? I'd love to know how you're avoiding the GM food.




posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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But squirrels are a little squirrely to begin with, how can you trust someone who hangs around with nuts?

Organic corn tastes so much better, why would a squirrel not know the difference. For some reason commercial corn nowadays seems to taste a little weird. It could be from stuff they spray on it to keep it longer though.



posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by Tranceopticalinclined
 


there was nothing in the original post that talked about GMO companies trying to kill us. it's just about money and cheap ways to keep production high and loss low. the more they figure out ways to modify the crops to prevent bugs and fungus the more they have to sell. they aren't specifically TRYING to kill people..... they just don't really care if there are disastrous side effects. greed does bad things to people.



posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


GMO foods is is just an obvious example of corporations in pursuit of profit.

Humans have reached a point in time where we can do a lot of things. some of them truly beneficial, some of them truly destructive to the common good. This distinction, however is no longer important. Corporations are not out to save the world. They are out to make profit. We as individuals occupying the commons have lost control of corporate adventurism and are now subject to whatever newly engineered convenience they can come up with. Thoughtful examination and consideration has no place at the table, and humanity and life itself has and will continue to pay the cost of these profits.

By the way, I read a study that says pigs don't recognize it as food either.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:36 AM
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reply to post by Ghost375
 





I've taken a look at that "evidence" and I've seen nothing conclusive. And I have seen absolutely no mechanism for how they could possibly cause the things people claim it causes.


Oh good, I'm glad your expert review of the evidence shows no correlation between GMO's and illness, perhaps you should write a letter and share your findings with the governments of Germany, Austria, Greece, Luxembourg, Hungary, and the UK, who have all found enough conclusive evidence to ban GMO's from their country.



When you actually know what GM really is, you realize it's not as scary as people make it out to be.


Really? Then enlighten us. I'd love to know what your definition of GM food is. But let me warn you, if you pull out hybrids like Tangelo's and Plumcot's you will be shot down. Those are not GMO's.



Also, you do know that pretty much all the food is genetically modified in some way, right? I'd love to know how you're avoiding the GM food.


I buy certified organic, and when going out to eat avoid corn and soy products. It's not bulletproof, but I'd say my GMO intake is nominal.

So go ahead, eat that Round Up Ready Corn. Let it share your plate with a big fat juicy steak pumped full of steroids and hormones, then wash it all down with an ice cold aspertame laden diet soda. After dinner take your prescriptions meds, sit down in front of the tube and watch some reality television, and maybe a little cable news. Don't worry, it's all good.

Unbelievable.
edit on 27-4-2013 by DirtyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by Ghost375
So the squirrel started with the non-GMO corn, finished it, moved onto the GMO one and realized he was full?
Did a squirrel die midway through eating the GMO corn? no?
ok, then get your anti-science propaganda out of here.
That picture is still purely propaganda. Just because it coincides with your viewpoint, however ill-informed, doesn't mean it's not propaganda.


you really think and assume that those corn's in the OP would only attract 1 squirrel ?



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


What I'd like to know is, why is the organic corn larger and look healthier than the GMO corn?



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 06:55 PM
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GMO cheerleaders need to consider how such foods will affect the human body over time....especially the liver and kidneys. Anyhow, keep eating that GMO corn and let us all know how it works out for ya. If you start to have purple popcorn show up in your poop, can't say you weren't warned.
Or, perhaps it will just make ya act a little "squirrely".



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by Ghost375
I'd love to know how you're avoiding the GM food.
exactly and that's what pisses me off so much about this. They've taken away my ability to make a choice between gmo or not. Not fair. And the worst part about it, which people like you seem to miss, is that it is not done to make us healthier it is done to improve the bottom line for the company. It's despicable that they would shove this down our throats only so they can make more money.




posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


Sorry but this doesn't prove anything and it's not that I'm okay with GMO products. We have no idea how long that corn has been placed there. It could be that they just haven't had enough time to eat it all.

I used to feed a certain squirrel at my house with bread. We called him George, after so long of him getting used to us feeding him bread (city squirrel) he would sit ontop of our step railing in the backyard waiting for us to feed him. I would go out there and hand him a piece of bread and he would literally take it out of my hands. He would even sit with us on the picknick table not 2 feet from us not scared at all and usually city squirrels will take off running if you get 10 feet close to them. Sadly, I think he died because he stopped coming around after the last winter.



posted on Apr, 28 2013 @ 10:27 AM
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Lol damn, thats bad



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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It's an interesting image, but there's way to few controls to be more than a curiosity. Doesn't look at other possibilities.

For example: Did you know that an American human who grows up never eating Indian food is likely to not appreciate Burfis as an adult? What did the squirrels grow up eating? If GMO corn (as noted earlier) has more sugar than natural corn, is that sufficient to discourage squirrels from eating? The GMO corn may still be perfectly healthy (aside from too much sugar!) and simply taste differently enough that the squirrels don't like it and go for something they're used to. Or, maybe one ear was fresher than the other! This image shows that squirrels have a preference, it's worth looking into, but says nothing of the overall health of GMO corn.

(says the guy slowly converting his backyard into a mostly natural vegetable garden)



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 11:07 PM
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Yeah, I would not put a whole lot of stock in what a squirrel gobbles. Like a previous poster, I've fed my fair share of wild squirrels, and people, they'll eat fecking anything you give them. One squirrel we fed, we named Cheesy Poof (I may or may not be an early-seasons South Park fan) Why? Because he was a diehard Cheetos fanatic. After we fed them long enough to tame them, they'd eat out of our hands, sit on us while eating, it was really pretty fun. And then sometimes not. CP literally picked the screen out of the track on the porch door, reached his little hand in there, unlocked the latch, and opened the door to get our attention inside, because he wanted his Cheetos RIGHTNAO. No one went outside at the normal time that day. He did this several times while we lived there, it was like squirrel crack or something. I'm pretty sure Cheetos is one of the products laden with chemicals, and GMOs. Another squirrel we fed, Pudge, was fond of leftover cereals going stale. Everything we'd bought was mainstream, like Lucky Charms, Cheerios, Frosted Flakes, Raisin Bran, etc, and I'm fairly sure contained, again, chemicals and GMOs. And I've since been told that meat is not good for them at all, but holy sh**, these guys were skilled pros at kamikaze-ing the table outside & running off with a grilled Ballpark.

Based on my own feeding experience, and hot dog thefts, no way in hell am I going to put a whole lot of stock in dubbing squirrels the bastions of health, let alone them being the flesh & blood divining rods for safe food. LMAO, they're just as bad as a seagull with what they eat.

However, I'm very much on the No GMOs bandwagon. Everything we do has the potential to flip an epigenetic switch & f*** it up for future offspring, and chisel away at our health as we age. I don't see GMOs, with all the genetic tinkering, as something worth it, and we should have a choice in the matter, not be unwilling or unsuspecting buyers of it. Ergo, stay as organic as you can afford to buy, or manage to grow, and eff Monsanto & Co.
edit on 5/25/2013 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)





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