Boston commissioner gets his lines wrong?

page: 1
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:22 AM
link   
So, came across this on you tube. I have searched but couldn't find anything on ATS.



He says 'Actors', before quickly correcting himself.

So, were the Boston bombings really actors, paid to play a part in the planned drill? Only to find themselves actually responsible for the atrocity that played out on the 15th April.

I am still not swayed either way on what actually went down in Boston, but with comments like this, it certainly doesn't help to make an informed decision.




posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:27 AM
link   
reply to post by Cobaltic1978
 


I'd love to know what the excuse is here for that slip of the tongue!!



The lads were set up...this is just one more bit of proof

Patsies....thats what they where.....Patsies!



edit on 23-4-2013 by zerozero00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:29 AM
link   
Just his wording in general was weird and "off". Hilariously, he's one of the actors, too, playing his role. Here is a better clip:




posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:36 AM
link   
reply to post by Cobaltic1978
 


W0W! I'd love to hear him getting his ass reamed after that mistake!



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:37 AM
link   
Simple mistake or slip of the tongue?

He needs to lay off the conspiraceys



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:38 AM
link   
Sometimes what slips out is the unconscious thoughts , interesting how unconsciously he was thinking "Actors" ..



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:38 AM
link   
reply to post by Merlin Lawndart
 


So they found explosives on or around the boat? There was only one arrest wasn't there? That was the arrest of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wasn't it?

Has that been disclosed? I have googled it, but can't find anything about this.



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 06:20 PM
link   
Police sometimes call someone who commits a crime "actor" as in the "person who commited the act". With all the theories of actors (as in theater) being involved in various mass killings, he probably corrected himself to avoid controversy. ObviouslyTOO LATE!



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by Magister
Police sometimes call someone who commits a crime "actor" as in the "person who commited the act". With all the theories of actors (as in theater) being involved in various mass killings, he probably corrected himself to avoid controversy. ObviouslyTOO LATE!


Really? I have never, not once heard this term used in policing terms. Not to say I doubt what you say. I am from the U.K so maybe it's a U.S policing thing?



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 04:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cobaltic1978

Originally posted by Magister
Police sometimes call someone who commits a crime "actor" as in the "person who commited the act". With all the theories of actors (as in theater) being involved in various mass killings, he probably corrected himself to avoid controversy. ObviouslyTOO LATE!


Really? I have never, not once heard this term used in policing terms. Not to say I doubt what you say. I am from the U.K so maybe it's a U.S policing thing?


It is not often used. Yes it is a US/east coast thing. Others are perp (perpetrator), suspect, offender, and various deurogatory names.



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:00 PM
link   
What slip of the tongue?
They WERE the two actors.


ac·tor [ak-ter]
noun

2. a person who does something; participant.


You guys have never heard people in law enforcement, or in a court of law describe the alleged criminals as actors?

It happens quite often and is appropriate because the word has more than one meaning.

If you think these two young men were actors as in "a person who acts in stage plays, motion pictures, television broadcasts, etc." then I would like to ask you this:

How much did they get paid to get shot, run over, killed and maimed after an alleged failed suicide?

These would have to be the most committed method actors in the history of acting.
So far into the role, they forgot they weren't criminals.

- Lee



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by aivlas
www.police.psu.edu...


A witness described the actor as a white male, approximately 6' tall, with short "dirty blond" hair, thin build,

A male actor broke three window panes, one on the second floor and two on the third floor,

on October 30, 2011, unknown actor(s) removed property from unsecured rooms

an unknown actor entered several rooms on every floor of


More uses of the word actor in reports on the site.

also
www.post-gazette.com...

and
www.northjersey.com...
edit on 23-4-2013 by aivlas because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   
reply to post by lee anoma
 
Especially if they were committing a "criminal act"...
I'll move along now.



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by Magister
Police sometimes call someone who commits a crime "actor" as in the "person who commited the act". With all the theories of actors (as in theater) being involved in various mass killings, he probably corrected himself to avoid controversy. ObviouslyTOO LATE!


Yes it is commonly used in the North East. All one has to look on the web. The term seems to come because the crimminal codes refer to accused as the actor in the crime. Police just pick it from their.

answers.yahoo.com...

or



"For unknown reason one actor decided to drive his golf cart into the pond at 3755 Greenlee Rd. submerging the cart. The second cart continued east on Greenlee Rd. making a right onto Oliver Road. This cart was found near the intersection of Oliver Rd. and South Hill Rd. with damage to the right front left and rear right well. I drove the gold cart approximately 2 miles back to the original location. Arrangements will be made by owners to secure first submerged golf cart."


from here www.post-gazette.com... ops-say-it-their-own-way-440665/
edit on 24-4-2013 by MrSpad because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by lee anoma
What slip of the tongue?
They WERE the two actors.


ac·tor [ak-ter]
noun

2. a person who does something; participant.


You guys have never heard people in law enforcement, or in a court of law describe the alleged criminals as actors?

It happens quite often and is appropriate because the word has more than one meaning.

If you think these two young men were actors as in "a person who acts in stage plays, motion pictures, television broadcasts, etc." then I would like to ask you this:

How much did they get paid to get shot, run over, killed and maimed after an alleged failed suicide?

These would have to be the most committed method actors in the history of acting.
So far into the role, they forgot they weren't criminals.

- Lee


Yeah, I'm sure it's a term used regularly in the U.S.

It's something I have never, ever, heard in the U,K relating to suspects. Are there awards given to such persons? You know, an equivalent to the Oscars for Criminals?



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cobaltic1978
Yeah, I'm sure it's a term used regularly in the U.S.

It's something I have never, ever, heard in the U,K relating to suspects.



Ah I see. Makes sense.
Well in your case I could understand the confusion.

I hope most of those on that Youtube video can say the same, because I'd be surprised if they had never heard the term used before in the States.

One Youtube user (iamgoddard) on that page does list a Google search that shows numerous uses of the terms he found in relation to crimes committed though.




In a couple minutes I found more examples of saying "actors" in the context of police investigations (google quotes for sources):

Burglary: "The actors opened the box and removed approximately $1,500…"

Theft: "The report said the actor took $5 in change and CDs."

Theft: "The caller said the actors were an unknown white male…"

Theft: "…owner of the store told police that the actors were…"

Robbery: "One of the actors was described as a black male…"


I'm sure that Commissioner meant 'actor' in that sense.

- Lee
edit on 24-4-2013 by lee anoma because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by lee anoma

Originally posted by Cobaltic1978
Yeah, I'm sure it's a term used regularly in the U.S.

It's something I have never, ever, heard in the U,K relating to suspects.



Ah I see. Makes sense.
Well in your case I could understand the confusion.

I hope most of those on that Youtube video can say the same, because I'd be surprised if they had never heard the term used before in the States.

One Youtube user (iamgoddard) on that page does list a Google search that shows numerous uses of the terms he found in relation to crimes committed though.




In a couple minutes I found more examples of saying "actors" in the context of police investigations (google quotes for sources):

Burglary: "The actors opened the box and removed approximately $1,500…"

Theft: "The report said the actor took $5 in change and CDs."

Theft: "The caller said the actors were an unknown white male…"

Theft: "…owner of the store told police that the actors were…"

Robbery: "One of the actors was described as a black male…"


I'm sure that Commissioner meant 'actor' in that sense.

- Lee
edit on 24-4-2013 by lee anoma because: (no reason given)


Yeah, all makes sense now. How silly was I to even question his slip up. D'oh!!!



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:41 PM
link   
Aye its never something the courts ever use here in the UK, it is always "the alleged" or "the accused". Because, you know, no one has actualy been tried in a court of law yet. Pretty libelous to say otherwise until there has in fact been a trial.



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tuttle
Aye its never something the courts ever use here in the UK, it is always "the alleged" or "the accused". Because, you know, no one has actualy been tried in a court of law yet. Pretty libelous to say otherwise until there has in fact been a trial.


Obviously a different set of rules in the U.S.

'The actor fired off several shots at the Local Enforcemnet Officers, culminating in a stand off whereby the actor was ultimately terminated'

Translated ' The accused started shooting at officers, before he was shot by a Police officer, resulting in the alleged suspects death'.



posted on Apr, 24 2013 @ 05:57 PM
link   
There is another thread on this ("Actors") but in defense of the Commissioner I believe his nomenclature refers to "actors" as those carrying out "acts" (of terrorism in this case)....not theatrical actors. Just my 2 cents.





new topics

top topics



 
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join