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physics question nagging me about big bang

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posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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I had to repost this because it turns out I don't have permission in the research forum. Mods, please move to whatever appropriate category. thanks.

I have heard about "inflation" and how, during the first moments of the big bang, space was traveling faster than the speed of light.

so, here's my question: If space was expanding faster than the speed of light, I have to wonder about temporal ramifications. IS IT POSSIBLE THAT A PART OF OUR UNIVERSE TRAVELED BACK IN TIME DURING THE FIRST MOMENTS OF THE BIG BANG?

I mean, we all have heard about special relativity. How the speed of light is constant regardless whether you're sitting still, moving away, or in a head-on direction towards the light; no matter what your speed.

Also, it is well known how time slows down as you approach the speed of light.

(as a related aside, the stronger the gravity, the slower the time also.)

is time slower in some part of the universe because of how fast its space expanded?

In the extreme speed of expansion during the first moments of the big bang, could the universe have expanded into the past AND/OR COULD THE UNIVERSE HAVE ALSO EXPANDED INTO ANOTHER DIMENSION(S) ALTOGETHER?

would there be telltale signs if these were the case?

COULD THIS ACCOUNT FOR WHY GALAXIES SEEM TO STILL BE ACCELERATING AWAY FROM EACH OTHER INSTEAD OF SLOWING DOWN?

oh well, at least I finally put it out there




posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


According to the theory space itself became bigger, not matter within space. No matter was ever traveling at or above C. So relativistic effects do not apply.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod
 


I can't imagine that only space itself was expanding and not the beginnings of our universe i.e. matter.

anyway, gravity isn't matter yet it affects time and, if it is extreme enough, light itself.

thanks for the response zaphod.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:31 PM
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I watched this video the other day and this this guy had a few interesting things to say about expansion. You may or may not find it of interest. It is quite long, but interesting.





posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:32 PM
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The universe as a whole expanded including what we call time. So the universe itself isn't affected by the effects of relativity because what ever the universe is "in" (The Multivers) has a different set of laws. But time is just our perception of movement through the 4th dimension. AND all of this is just theory and well probably never know.
edit on 21-4-2013 by BriGuyTM90 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by reject
is time slower in some part of the universe because of how fast its space expanded?
should be emended to:

is time and/or light slower in some part of the universe because of how fast its space expanded?
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: punctuation and highlighting




posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by reject
reply to post by Zaphod
 

.

anyway, gravity isn't matter yet it affects time and, if it is extreme enough, light itself.

thanks for the response zaphod.


Gravity ALWAYS has Affects on light. It just isn't noticeable until large gravitational field are involved. Also gravity is an Effect of matter so it is really the matter that is Affecting the light. Hope that helps
edit on 21-4-2013 by BriGuyTM90 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by BriGuyTM90
 


just a perception? physicists say time is most probably a very real factor.

also, I have a theory there are four basic forces underlying everything in the same way that only a maximum of four points can be equidistant from each other.

I had other weird theories playing out in my head but my memory isn't too good



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by BriGuyTM90
 


is there matter in a blackhole?



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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the big bang is bull s**t. fred hoyle rocks! (kinda).
edit on 21-4-2013 by OutonaLimb because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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What gets me is if galaxies are speeding away from one another in expansion... why is Andromeda and the Milky Way on course to slam into each other?

Just wondering...



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


Yes, there is. Most likly it is not in a form any of us would be familiar with. (protons electrons neutrons) But it would be a supper dense soup of sorts of subatomic particles. That's the theory anyway.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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IF the big band model is correct, which personally I have my doubts about, then there is something simple that cannot be overlooked. This is the fact that space-time did not yet exist. The cosmic speed limit exists within space itself, but space itself is what was expanding after the big bang occurred. So there was supposedly no fabric of space-time yet in existence. Therefore what has been expanding since that time, besides all of the physical matter in the universe, is space-time itself. Therefore the universe is probably increasing in size as the fabric of space-time keeps expanding, which would mean that today that the universe is humongous, lol. But again, this is IF not only the big bang model is correct, but also relativity and concept of space-time.

Now about the time travel aspect of your question. The theory of relativity only includes the idea of time travel inside the fabric of space-time, therefore if space-time was what was expanding the fastest, I do not see how anything like time travel could have potentially occurred. Now I should state that everything I just said is based on my understanding of the physical universe and the current beliefs of modern physics, and are not necessarily based on the truth, since I could be mistaken in my understanding. So basically what I am saying is "listen to me at your own risk, because I could be full of it." Haha, I am pretty sure I am correct, but I mentioned this so that you could double check if need be.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by BriGuyTM90
 


from what I read, there is only the singularity which I take to be a single point. Could you call that matter?

Maybe the singularity is even one of those "strings?"



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by JiggyPotamus
 


fyi:these are mostly my musings.

in my theory, there has always been time then space expanded into it.

(another aside: in between postings, one of my crazy theories came back to me but now it evades me again
)
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: fixed the

edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: changed and to then for clarity



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by BriGuyTM90
 


of course, I just happen to be someone who is not so eloquent
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because:




posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by Terminal1
 


which may actually mean these galaxies formed in space that expanded at the same speed which may make the case for my theory...given their proximity, it stands to reason

edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


I can't imagine that only space itself was expanding and not the beginnings of our universe.

They are one and the same. It may be hard to imagine, but Zaphod and JiggyPotamus are right.

The universe isn't expanding 'into' anything. Space doesn't exist outside the universe—even if you favour a 'multiverse' hypothesis like BriGuyTM90. If there is anything 'outside' the universe, it isn't what we call space, and we shall never know what it is.

By the way, this answer reflects, to the best of my understanding, current opinion in the scientific community.

edit on 21/4/13 by Astyanax because: Currant O'Pinion.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


only space was expanding and no matter along with it? that has got to be wrong. that's what he was saying.


Originally posted by Zaphod
reply to post by reject
 


According to the theory space itself became bigger, not matter within space. No matter was ever traveling at or above C. So relativistic effects do not apply.


I think time was already there before the big bang so you could say the universe was expanding into time; space and time becoming intertwined in the universe
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-4-2013 by reject because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by reject
 

If you choose to differ from the best scientific opinion currently available, go ahead. As someone else pointed out, we'll never know, anyway.

If you want to learn more, there's plenty of good stuff on the internet. Just make sure your source is a respectable one. Try famous university web sites—their physics departments often have plenty of freshman-level articles on topics like these.





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