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Nestlé CEO Says Water Is Food That Should Be Privatized – Not A Human Right

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posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Damn that sucks but I know that catching rain water in some South American countries is forbidden if I recall? I can't remember which ones exactly but I saw a few documentaries which people couldn't catch any.




posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

What I learned is that water falling ON land falls under the legal jurisdiction of the government of that area

Water UNDER the land belongs to the person who owns the land.


This is correct, I own land with a man-made lake created by a dam. I have the dam inspected regularly for safety and for compliance capability on waterflow. Below it are water sources for the municipality, fish farms, agriculture, etc. Were I to stop the waterflow temporarily (I cannot stop it for long), to fill my lake more, I would be causing harm to all those down the river from me.

However, I also have 5 springs on that same property, and as long as I intercept that water before it confluences with the lake, its infeed, or outfeed, then that water is mine.

I had considered at one time, using the spring water to create a bottled water company, but when I had my group run the business plan, the sustainability for the company was not there (sufficient volume and retained earnings).... it was better financially to let the springs continue to feed the rivers.

As long as we sustain a condition whereby it is better to let the springs feed the rivers, then we have proven out the very principle which the OP and posters here are contending. A sound one.

However, if we inflate and bubble the water market (intentional pun yes
) - to such a state where it is more profitable to intercept water than to allow it to flow into its natural infrastructure, then we have let our social manipulation bubble economy run amok, and will cause great damage.

So yes, water can be sold, but CEO Peter Brabeck did not appear here to grasp the value chain implications of that principle. Which is pretty sad since he is Chairman (not CEO) of a 90 billion Swiss Franc company, and apparently he does not grasp this - only desires the income involved (note the difference, in socialism you focus on the income, and in capitalism you focus on sustainability and retained earnings....).

But, then again, he is the expert - and we should defer to him, according to those who are 'oh so much smarter'.






edit on 21-4-2013 by TheEthicalSkeptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 12:18 PM
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Seriously? We really can't laugh at anyone now when they say air is next. But in all fairness, crap like this will only continue until people stop being pussies and work together to oppose it. Not enough people stand up and that's how stupid laws and things like this happen, Ireland here is a good example of that.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 12:49 PM
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Another reason not to eat their tasteless swill...unless you prefer 'privatized' "spring" water too!
Not that we needed any more reasons...
They deserve nothing more than they give ______



LOVE



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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Don't see how Republicans and Libertarians can be opposed to this.

Profit > Human life



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by seeker1963
 


Boycotting Nestle products over water would not be the first time Nestle was subject to a boycott.

In the late '70s, a boycott of Nestle products was organized in response to Nestle's aggressive marketing of baby formula to third world mothers. Nestle would, allegedly, supply powdered baby formula samples to new mothers in hospital for free. This potentially interfered with the mother's lactation and, once the mother left the hospital, the formula was no longer free. Other problems included the lack of a sanitary water supply to mix with the powdered formula, the lack of knowledge of or means to sanitize the available water, and the use of less powder than required in order to make the container last longer leading to poor nutrition.

The boycott was lifted in the mid '80s when Nestle agreed to abide by the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes but Nestle, and others, have been accused of violating this Code and the boycott was re-instituted in '89. Many European education facilities ban the sale of Nestle products in their shops and vending machines.

Nestle claims to be in compliance but as recently as 2011 they have been accused of violating the Code in Laos.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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Unless you have a well and/or rain collection then surely you pay for water as it is. In my city the water dept. bill is wrapped into the trash bill. They charge a dual charge on water in the form of "sewer" fees (even tho far less than half my water in goes back out via horticulture, sounds water management, etc). But they still charge me. The city government monopoly has the worst customer service you can have, right along side the monopoly 'private' power company. Each is only open 9-5 mon-fri hours, so if service goes off on Friday you cant even call in your payment and get it back on and sooner than next Monday. Each monopoly rapes and pillages us as far as I'm concerned. The 2 communication companies, each have competition and each accept phone calls 24/7 and you can get your service restored 24/7. Do with these facts what you will.
edit on 21-4-2013 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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God bless America. Land that I love, from Nestle's Sea to Nestle's Shining Sea (New and improved ... Now with Profit!!!)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by seeker1963
 


I agree with you. No more Nestlé products for me. What a greedy SOB! He justifies this by making it sound like he is doing a good thing here creating jobs. I guess if you have little income you don't deserve to have water and must die.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by karmajayne
 


Next up: taxes on oxygen.

It's coming.

Please, don't give those morons any ideas!......heck there could be a tax on that too!!!



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by karmajayne
 

I seen a programme a few years ago in Britain on the community channel and they were discussing the future of fresh water. The show called it 'blue gold' and nestle was one of the companies involved in buying up fresh water sources. Interestingly one of the people buying up land that contained fresh water in Venezuela was non other than George Bush' daughter. Strange how you can be an enemy of Venezuela but still hand over thousands of dollars to buy their land. Fresh water is the next big thing because although we have desalination plants, it still costs millions to build a treatment centre.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:28 PM
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As far as "rights", do you have a right to food? Sure, if you grow it. But you cant have a right to the investments and work of others. Period.

The only "right" you can have to water that I can see is if you install a well and get enough solar juice to power it (investments).

One thing to consider would be what would happen to the national water supply if everyone had deep wells run by solar, if all of the millions of monopolized city dwellers now has unbridled water usage? WIthout those people first developing sound water usage habits, we'd be in a disaster. Currently only the bill restricts the great masses wreckful use of water, no?



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by karmajayne
 


nestles facebook page makes hilarious viewing, you should see them back pedalling and trying to butter everyone up.

Pathetic.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by karmajayne
 


Next up: taxes on oxygen.

It's coming.


There was a comedy sketch on that - might have been "Smith and Jones" or "Not the Nine'O'Clock news". After water privatization, came air privatization. Everyone was required to wear oxygen helmets with meters when going about the street.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by karmajayne
 


Next up: taxes on oxygen.

It's coming.


There was a comedy sketch on that - might have been "Smith and Jones" or "Not the Nine'O'Clock news". After water privatization, came air privatization. Everyone was required to wear oxygen helmets with meters when going about the street.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by stormcell
 

That sketch rings a bell

Seriously though it's all getting very silly but also very real with the privatisation on things such as this.
Money talks it seems.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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What are the chances of this being a hoax.

I mention this because this guy talks about how his business needs to be profitable because of all the lives involved and the people thats directly affected by Nestle... then he brags about how mechanised the factories are and how they don't need people.

It is just an odd video imho.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 02:25 PM
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Originally posted by kykweer
What are the chances of this being a hoax.

I mention this because this guy talks about how his business needs to be profitable because of all the lives involved and the people thats directly affected by Nestle... then he brags about how mechanised the factories are and how they don't need people.

It is just an odd video imho.


nope its legit, take from a documenfary from 2005.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by karmajayne
 


Bernie Ecclestone, Billionaire F1 franchise owner in relation to Bahrain:

The 82 year-old, asked if he should be bringing Formula One to a country with a recent history of human rights abuses, replied that it was not his job to take a moral position.
“We don’t go anywhere to judge how a country is run,” he said. “I keep asking people, what human rights - I don’t know what they are.
"The rights are that people who live in the country abide by the laws of the country, whatever they are. I might be in Africa and can go 200kmph on the highway with no problem. If I come to England and do the same thing, I’m in trouble. So it’s a case of whatever the laws are, people need to respect them.”

Thatcher (spit) - and I'm no commie - privatised UK water (bills and spills worsen yearly),,,

Another recent employment issue was a bus driver fired for attending his FIRST BORN CHILD'S BIRTH - after trying but failing to get someone to take his shift... To me this is also a HUMAN RIGHT...

The water thing is not much of a concern to me (as I live in the UK, not a DESERT) - I can't see people guarding all the waterways and RAIN CLOUDS!



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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I fear that one day my children will be paying for the very air that they breath,are we to be taxed for the 70% water in our bodies? ugh
i shudder to think of what freadom will look like 50 years from now



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