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Justin Trudeau Becomes Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada

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posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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reply to post by cayrichard
 


I agree with you for the most part about who Justin Trudeau is, as a personality and as the product of the union of two individuals in a particular kind of marriage. He takes after his mother and his father both, with the edge going to his mother.

"The typical Canadian" as you put it, is going to elect our next Prime Minister based on a superficial understanding of the political process and an urealistic assessment of just what it is in the power of a Prime Minister to do. It is very difficult for any politician to dominate the elite corporate entities in the land without serious negative economic consequences.

A Prime Minister, from any political party, must work with these entities and get them to work with him.

I have to say that I disagree to some extent with your assessment of Pierre Trudeau's initiatives on immigration. Yes the doors were opened wide and yes this did lead to problems that we are attempting to cope with, but something drastic had to be done at the time. Our population was very small when Trudeau came into office, just over 20,000,000 people. There was serious concern about this at the time because immigrants were not choosing to come to Canada in sufficient numbers to maintain a steady growth of the population.

Canadian politicians were uneasy about a potential slowdown in growth in Canada while the population in the sunnier United States continued to grow.

This graph is from an article on population in Canada from Wikipedia. Notice that the growth from about 1950 up to about 2007 is almost a straight line, even taking into consideration the way that Trudeau acted to boost immigration. It is clear that without such actions our population growth would have dipped more to the horizontal. It is also clear that all governments since Trudeau have acted in such a way as to maintain a rate of growth that began in roughly 1950, long before Trudeau came to power.

en.wikipedia.org...



I think Trudeau gets a bad rap on immigration.

Yes we recruited in the Carribean for new Canadians, and in Hong Kong, and yes people from these regions are less like the Anglo/European stock that had hitherto made up the bulk of the population, but the fact of the matter is that as Europe started to recover after WW2, fewer people chose to come to our cold climate from that region of the world so Canadian politicians had to act to maintain population growth at a rate that at least held close to a traditional ratio to the population of the United States.

This has created some "issues" of cultural compatibility but we are way ahead of the Europeans in solving problems associated with the mixing of cultures. They are now only starting to face problems that were first faced in Canada back in the 1970s.

Of course other factors come into the equation, the explosion of the drug trade, etc., but without maintaining population growth, Canada would have been in a much more serious situation than it is now vis a vis holding our own in the world and particularly against the pressure of the United States.


edit on 16-4-2013 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 07:26 AM
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I worked with various political parties arranging PSAs. Trydeaus staff were the friendliest, most prompt and best at communication overall. The video he produced as the best by far and showed a deep understanding of the emotions of Canadian politics, not just the motions.

To those who are worried that he does not challenge Harper effectively, I think you should end up surprised. As the leader of the Young Liberals he has a lot of organization on his sides. Hs ability to appeal to youth through drug reform on marijuana will be a factor in getting a larger turn out.
edit on 17-4-2013 by GBSsurvivor because: Typo,



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck

Originally posted by Nuke2013
Justin Trudeau is a puppet and nothing more than an empty air head, no experiance, plain and simple ideas with no foundation......Someone in the background will be stearing him all the way to hell.
Denis coderre would of been a way better choice but alas....He was "pushed" aside for this little bobble head.
You might be right. Thing is, the party elected him fair and square, and everyone had an opportunity to give such things due consideration. Bear in mind...these are folks who bothered to think about it and vote. That's a start. There is no federal election until 2015...he has that time to prove himself. If you still don't like him, you're free to vote for any of the other parties.


You're right, he was voted in by a party of his peers, I will not argue that point at all. What irks me is the motivation of his nomination. He was put in place because of the name he has, the popularity aspect and the figure head he could be, not the experience and knowledge. The liberals are counting on the kid being able to ride his daddies coat tails.

As for Denis Coderre, I was his driver while Chretien was Prime Minister, I know tha man more than most and I can assure you that this man would of made a great Prime Minister if given the chance to lead his party, alas the Liberal have set him aside far to many times and he is now contemplating to be in the race for Mayor of Montreal...He is sick and tired of the Liberal party lines adopted by Martin, Dion Ignatief......



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by Nuke2013
What irks me is the motivation of his nomination. He was put in place because of the name he has, the popularity aspect and the figure head he could be, not the experience and knowledge. The liberals are counting on the kid being able to ride his daddies coat tails.
I disagree. While I will grant you that there is a degree of 'celebrity' involved, there are larger issues in the Liberal party. It doesn't take much to realise that they have been busy stabbing their (our) leaders in the backs for some time now. What did it get them? Third party status, that's what.

There are some who want to keep playing the same damn game with the same damn hand, and don't get that it's a loser. Maybe that has more to do with the nature of who they're obliged to. Dion and Iggy, both, could have made fine PMs if they were to be judged on their merits. Leaders, they obviously weren't.

So now we have somebody come forward who has the confidence of the party, and the capability to draw from a younger electoral base...many of whom don't even vote because of their distrust of the system. Or those who went with Jack, because he was perceived as a man worthy of their respect and their vote.

The basic problem here is that Trudeau is trying to take some of the cynicism out of public service...and is being judged by those same cynical standards. Pray tell...what, in your opinion would a fresh start look like?



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


However, at this point, immigration is starting to be a problem. Look at Britain as an example. They are being outweighed by the non-intergrating masses, and loosing the identity of "Englishness"

Are we next?



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by IronArm
reply to post by ipsedixit
 


However, at this point, immigration is starting to be a problem. Look at Britain as an example. They are being outweighed by the non-intergrating masses, and loosing the identity of "Englishness"

Are we next?


Yes, in a word. Canada, of all countries in the world probably has the least chance of freezing its cultural identity in time. Even the old monolithic cultures of Europe are feeling pressure. Even the most monolithic culture of first rank in the world, Japan, faced with not much more than a football stadium full of "foreigners" in the entire country is alarmed!!! in some quarters.

Living in Toronto, international city, least "Canadian" city in the country, I can tell you, "Relax, it'll be alright."

We are becoming a little bit like them and they are becoming a little bit like us. In a couple of generations, relatively "new" Canadians will be as alarmed as you are about recent immigrants.


On the plus side, from your point of view, one should keep in mind that "Canadian identity" is largely formed by our shared experiences in coping with this very big, very cold country.

In the middle of the winter when I am waiting for the cross town bus on Bloor St. on a Sunday morning, so that I can join the other strap hangers because the subway isn't open yet, I look into the faces of my fellow sufferers, from Asia and from the Caribbean, and see the same grim look of endurance that has been shared by Canadians all over the country, for generations.

We have made the country, but the country has also made us, as it will make the newcomers too.
edit on 17-4-2013 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid
That being said the West never considered the Maritimes in anything anyway.


I'm from NB and everytime I said in Calgary "Yeah, I'm from East coast" they ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS say "Oh where, Ontario?"



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by CALGARIAN

Originally posted by intrepid
That being said the West never considered the Maritimes in anything anyway.

I'm from NB and everytime I said in Calgary "Yeah, I'm from East coast" they ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS say "Oh where, Ontario?"
I don't need to tell you how stoopid that is, right? I guess their brains got overloaded by the word East. But these days they'd just figure you were from 'Da Rock'.

Truth is, I traveled all over Alberta in the mid 70's, and the folks were always great. Mind you, as a long hair, I left town during 'Little Britches Rodeo'...but I digress.

Hey, we all want the same thing, right?


Originally posted by ipsedixit
In the middle of the winter when I am waiting for the cross town bus on Bloor St. on a Sunday morning, so that I can join the other strap hangers because the subway isn't open yet, I look into the faces of my fellow sufferers, from Asia and from the Caribbean, and see the same grim look of endurance that has been shared by Canadians all over the country, for generations.

We have made the country, but the country has also made us, as it will make the newcomers too.
I could not star this enough. That was very eloquent and could, perhaps, only be topped by Gilles Vigneault - "Mon Pays, ce n'est pas un pays, c'est l'hiver"

Well said...well said.
edit on 17-4-2013 by JohnnyCanuck because: ...just because, eh?



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by CALGARIAN

Originally posted by intrepid
That being said the West never considered the Maritimes in anything anyway.


I'm from NB and everytime I said in Calgary "Yeah, I'm from East coast" they ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS say "Oh where, Ontario?"


I lived in BC in the 70's. Everything east of Quebec was considered Newfoundland. Annoying isn't it.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
I lived in BC in the 70's. Everything east of Quebec was considered Newfoundland. Annoying isn't it.
Heck, I considered everything east of Pickering to be Greater Newfoundland. I did not know at the time how complimentary a statement that actually was.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
I lived in BC in the 70's. Everything east of Quebec was considered Newfoundland. Annoying isn't it.


I spent the winter of 70-71 in Vancouver. What a culture shock that was! BC is almost nothing like the ROC. Laid back, relaxed, focused on Hawaii, California, Wreck Bay and doobies.

I grew up in New Brunswick. I didn't think these people were even Canadians. But they were.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


I grew up in NB too, still live here actually but spent many years in Ottawa and out west in BC. It is a totally different place I must agree. It certainly is Canadian though, and it just goes to show we aren't all the same from coast to coast.

~Tenth



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit
I spent the winter of 70-71 in Vancouver. What a culture shock that was! BC is almost nothing like the ROC. Laid back, relaxed, focused on Hawaii, California, Wreck Bay and doobies. I grew up in New Brunswick. I didn't think these people were even Canadians. But they were.
Yah...kinda hard-pressed to admit it though, weren't they?


If this is is a line of conversation about politics and regional animosity...our American friends must be thinking we're pretty tame, eh? No matter...my Canada includes Florida!



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
Yah...kinda hard-pressed to admit it though, weren't they?


That was pretty early on when the various segments of the country were only just beginning to become aware that they weren't all exactly alike. I found people in BC, who were absolutely great by the way, just automatically assumed that I was exactly like them. It was amusing. But I was really goggled eyed by BC and found it so relaxing to be there. I just loved it and wanted to go back.


If this is is a line of conversation about politics and regional animosity...our American friends must be thinking we're pretty tame, eh? No matter...my Canada includes Florida!


On the subject of our American friends. If any of them are reading this thread with the hope of coming to a better understanding of Canadians, I would suggest that the closest thing psychologically in a certain way to a Canadian in the United States is someone from New Jersey.

Some time ago I realized that I resonated with people from New Jersey, of all places. There is something in the "state personality" that comes from being very close to New York but knowing that they will never outshine New York. There is a patience, a quiet diffidence, a modesty. It is not an inferiority complex. It is a wise recognition of reality that still maintains its dignity in the face of New York's swagger.

In that way people from New Jersey are like Canadians. They are the "American Canadians", I think.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit

Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
Yah...kinda hard-pressed to admit it though, weren't they?

That was pretty early on when the various segments of the country were only just beginning to become aware that they weren't all exactly alike. I found people in BC, who were absolutely great by the way, just automatically assumed that I was exactly like them. It was amusing. But I was really goggled eyed by BC and found it so relaxing to be there. I just loved it and wanted to go back.
By the time I got there in the mid-seventies, Vancouver was full of Torontonians who bitterly resented being reminded of their 'back east' roots. Most annoying!



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit

Originally posted by IronArm
reply to post by ipsedixit
 


However, at this point, immigration is starting to be a problem. Look at Britain as an example. They are being outweighed by the non-intergrating masses, and loosing the identity of "Englishness"

Are we next?


Yes, in a word. Canada, of all countries in the world probably has the least chance of freezing its cultural identity in time. Even the old monolithic cultures of Europe are feeling pressure. Even the most monolithic culture of first rank in the world, Japan, faced with not much more than a football stadium full of "foreigners" in the entire country is alarmed!!! in some quarters.

Living in Toronto, international city, least "Canadian" city in the country, I can tell you, "Relax, it'll be alright."

We are becoming a little bit like them and they are becoming a little bit like us. In a couple of generations, relatively "new" Canadians will be as alarmed as you are about recent immigrants.


On the plus side, from your point of view, one should keep in mind that "Canadian identity" is largely formed by our shared experiences in coping with this very big, very cold country.

In the middle of the winter when I am waiting for the cross town bus on Bloor St. on a Sunday morning, so that I can join the other strap hangers because the subway isn't open yet, I look into the faces of my fellow sufferers, from Asia and from the Caribbean, and see the same grim look of endurance that has been shared by Canadians all over the country, for generations.

We have made the country, but the country has also made us, as it will make the newcomers too.
edit on 17-4-2013 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



Gotta admit, beautifully put. I guess to be honest, I have conflicting heritage as well, (British, French, Cree, Ojibwa) and that has made me what I am.... but that...is more Canadian.

I do, unfortunately, look up to the US for one thing. If you become an American, you are American. Be American. Or at least try. Canada spends far too much time bending over backwards to make exceptions for new imports don't you agree?



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck

Originally posted by ipsedixit
I spent the winter of 70-71 in Vancouver. What a culture shock that was! BC is almost nothing like the ROC. Laid back, relaxed, focused on Hawaii, California, Wreck Bay and doobies. I grew up in New Brunswick. I didn't think these people were even Canadians. But they were.
Yah...kinda hard-pressed to admit it though, weren't they?


If this is is a line of conversation about politics and regional animosity...our American friends must be thinking we're pretty tame, eh? No matter...my Canada includes Florida!


Florida! My God, I would kill to have that. The snow around here is depressing me.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by IronArm
I do, unfortunately, look up to the US for one thing. If you become an American, you are American. Be American. Or at least try. Canada spends far too much time bending over backwards to make exceptions for new imports don't you agree?


I think so in some ways, but these have to do with the complex modalities of what I call "Gubmint".

I don't know if you read the quotation that was included in one of my earlier posts describing "gubmint". Gubmint is the process used to divide large portions of Canadian tax dollars for spending on various programs and projects.

Some spending on immigrants and refugees and people on welfare is connected to this process and has nothing to do with Canadian officials being generous, humane, broad minded, saintly or anything of the like. It is related solely to designing projects suited to spending tax dollars available in certain amounts.

It is a very mechanistic process in which certain segments of society like immigrants receive "collateral benefits, regrettable but unavoidable", to take a phrase from another context and give it a different application, "collateral" to the process by which stakeholders, insiders, friends of friends, pressure groups and others, carve chunks off the budget.

Service providers who benefit from the spending on such programs don't care whose teeth they are fixing, or whatever. It is just that money is available in amounts that dictate the size of the program. A program that couldn't be extended to all Canadians is designed with money to be spent on some group, any group, immigrants if necessary, who exist in numbers that suit the program design and the money available.

A lot of the aggravating things of that sort are related to "gubmint" and how it works, in my opinion, not to fat headed administrators in Ottawa who just can't think straight.
edit on 17-4-2013 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-4-2013 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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I would never personally accept this soft pantywaist coat-tail riding liberal school teacher as a leader of my great nation, he has about as much experience for such a position as Obama did/does; nothing more than a shiny good looking pop culture icon who has so far had nothing better to offer than regurgitated talking points that I've heard from the left here in Canada for far to long. I hazard to guess his wife could do just as good a job as she has about the same experience, seriously. He offers absolutely nothing new or inspiring and I would seriously reconsider my portfolio if this 'neolib' grabbed the reins of this great nation and turned it back towards the days of the massively corrupt Jean Chretien and Paul Martin years. A return to a 1990's style tax scheme, sorry, fiscal rape of successful small business owners is just what this country needs right now!

However, I would imagine the growing lazy entitlement culture of the inner cities would absolutely adore such type of "shiny good looking" leadership that lacks actual political substance, especially places like Toronto and Vancouver. Such massive asinine expenditures on bloated social programs for special interest groups appeal to the core of these parasites. (No, not welfare entitlements, the Ontario Liberals have already completely destroyed Ontario in that aspect) Think much bigger


Here's what little Justin had to say about the recent terrorist attacks in Boston:


In an interview on CBC's The National Tuesday, Trudeau was asked how would he -- if he were prime minister -- handle a similar incident. The neophyte leader said beyond "any material immediate support" Canada should "look at the root causes." "But there is no question that this happened because there is someone who feels completely excluded, completely at war with innocents, at war with a society. And our approach has to be, okay, where do those tensions come from?" he said.


This was the response from a *REAL* leader, our Prime-minister, someone who actually has a god damn clue:


"When you see this kind of violent act, you do not sit around trying to rationalize it or make excuses for it or figure out its root causes," Harper said, speaking to journalists in London, where he attended the funeral for Margaret Thatcher. "You condemn it categorically, and to the extent that you can deal with the perpetrators, you deal with them as harshly as possible, and that is what this government would do if it ever was faced with such actions."


PM Responds To Little Justins Asinine Remarks

Little Justin thinks the poor terrorists are simply misunderstood and misguided, there must be *SOME* logical reasoning behind all of these 'snackbars' in the name of islam or some other disgusting excuse for killing innocent people. Perhaps an injection of tax payer funded mass research of how we can better understand why useless human garbage have resorted to close to 30,000 deadly terrorist attacks since 9/11 might help Justin?

I would go as far to say that Thomas Mulcair of the NDP has more political knowledge in his little finger than little Justin does in his entire body, and that's *NOT* saying very much. What a joke, and a scary one at that -well, for those of us who work for a living and pay taxes it is...
edit on 17-4-2013 by Jocko Flocko because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
How stupid are people?
Justin Trudeau = another Obama.....
a hollow construct of the spindoctors with the strings of power reaching far into the back rooms. of international bankery.....


Well, one thing I will give Justin and his father, they really don't hide their smug attitude. They should copyright the "Just Watch Me" as their motto. The more rhetoric I hear from Justin, the more I can see he has the same ideals as his father, Canada can not afford another Pierre Trudeau.




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