White powder substance in my yard.

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posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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Woke up this morning to this weird powdery substance in random spots around my yard.
It has no smell and this is the first time I've seen this around my yard. I'm honestly very confused about what this is and why it is in my yard.





Has not snowed in my area in a couple of weeks.
edit on 14-4-2013 by WhoFeelsitKnowsit because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by WhoFeelsitKnowsit
 


Get it tested!!

Try a college or whatever, but unless you know exactly what it is, it is hard to blame it on anything......



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by WhoFeelsitKnowsit
 


Looks like fire extinguisher residue at first glance

Has anyone been running around spraying one?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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Ash, and or pollen?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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Looks like bad dandruff to me pmsl



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:17 PM
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If you're near a thick of trees/campsites or whatnot, I know sometimes people will dump their ashes from their pits in not so secure places, and the wind will carry it. It looks like campfire ash to me.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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Does it smear or is it granular? When you wet it what happens?

I agree about getting it tested. I have no idea if that cost anything though.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by WhoFeelsitKnowsit
 


Taste it.


Edit - I was joking.....don't taste it!!!!
edit on 14-4-2013 by billy565 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:41 PM
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Looks like powdery mildew to me. This is a fungal infection that looks very much like what you have going there. Seen this a few times, but usually effects plants that are in a very tight growing situation where the humidity gets too high and not enough air movement. I would definitely NOT taste it or inhale it by trying to see if it smells either. Get it tested...



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 06:58 PM
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posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Hmmm....what dew u think it is?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by billy565
 


What's up Billy, Really I think it's pollen. All the op needs to do to rule that out is look at it with a magnifying glass. Locust trees, Pine trees and many others put it out real heavy some times.






posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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Pollen tends to be yellow - cna't see that myself. Looks a lot like ash as has been mentioned.

Either that or chemtrails are eral - because what else could it possibly be??




posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


Oh, not in Alabama and the south it isn't. Every vehicle and home in the region turns a lovely green color from April until sometime during summer. And the count is usually WAY off the charts. Only places (Alabama and Georgia) I've ever lived that have an "Extreme" on their count charts (and it's usually well above that level).

Average pollen count is around 120, Huntsville put out an alert last May for Alabama because the pollen count hit 2017. The scary part is that they're ranked 2nd highest in the nation. Fort Payne AL, April 10th the count was 6350, the 11th it was 7968, and the 12th was 7968.


edit on 4/14/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


Cherimoya




One tree that has white pollen in May is the cherimoya, Annona cherimola, which produces edible fruit with segmented green rinds and pale inner flesh. The flowers bloom in late spring or early summer. The cherimoya tree is from South America but grows in the warmer regions of the United States, such as Hawaii and Southern California , Florida and South Eastern states. Look for droopy, whitish flowers with three long petals that hang downward. The outsides of the petals may be brownish. Leaves are large, up to three-quarters of a foot long, but the tree tends to drop leaves before forming flowers.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


I stand corrected. However pollen tends to be from many sources, and whether some of it is white, or much of it is green, I still think none of it is going to turn ash coloured



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


I'm not saying 100% it is pollen, and pollen comes in many colors. As I said in my reply to Billy.. What the OP really should do is take a look at it under a magnifying glass. That will let him know if it is natural or not. Then he can narrow the field down.

Here's one color chart of pollen.

edit on 14-4-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Somehow I don't think that's a pollen colour chart...



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Your kidding right ?
2nd

Wait a min, I know what happen with your reply. I did post the wrong pic and had to edit. You don't mean the current pic do you? That first pic was up for about 30 seconds sorry.
edit on 14-4-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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If it was me, no way I would be touching an unknown substance like that with my bare hands lol. I am a country boy, I have sure never seen pollen anywhere near that thick, but then again it is NY and New Brunswic, areas, colder temps might make some kind of difference in the pollen travelling or something.





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