The Vatican Necropolis

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 07:23 AM
link   
I just wanted to know what people think of the Vatican being built upon a kind of pagan burial site?

I mean do you think it contradicts the fact that they ( The preisthood ) are supposedly devoted to the teachings of Jesus ?

Is it infact the case that the Pope just pops down stairs to do his rituals maybe?

I know this is oldish news. I mean by this that this conspiracy was said quite a while ago.

Looking around the Necropolis can be found on this websitewww.vatican.va...


Isnt the Vatican meant to follow only " one" God?




posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:09 AM
link   
reply to post by FreedomEntered
 


How do you think the christian church became the one 'church'?
It built its churches upon ancient sites of pagan worship to wipe away the memories of the old religions, no point in leaving them alone in case people reverted.
Same goes for christian feasts and holy days which were co-opted likewise.
Do you think that Jesus was born on december 25th?

Every ancient cathedral and church in the old world rests on or near a much older sacred place, grove or spring.

edit on 4/14/13 by HumansEh because: correction



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 11:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by HumansEh
reply to post by FreedomEntered
 


How do you think the christian church became the one 'church'?
It built its churches upon ancient sites of pagan worship to wipe away the memories of the old religions, no point in leaving them alone in case people reverted.
Same goes for christian feasts and holy days which were co-opted likewise.
Do you think that Jesus was born on december 25th?

Every ancient cathedral and church in the old world rests on or near a much older sacred place, grove or spring.

edit on 4/14/13 by HumansEh because: correction


Exactly. And it wasn't just so people wouldn't revert but it was also because they knew that some people held those sites as sacred and would attend church just to be there. Also, when many of the old cathedrals were built, they only had pagan builders available and there was much non-Christian symbolism incorporated into the masonry. This allowed pagans of various paths to go to the cathedrals but still worship their own deities. This is much like how Santaria developed (a way to use Catholic saints as their own gods and goddesses).



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 12:06 PM
link   

That which is known as the Christian religion existed among the ancients,
and never did not exist;
from the beginning of the human race until the time when Christ came in the flesh, at which time the true religion, which already existed
began to be called Christianity.
(St. Augustine, Retractt. I, xiii)


i think this cover it.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 12:16 PM
link   
Oh I see so a method to convert folk. But now couldnt they just remove the pagan items and put them in a museum to be viewed?
It seems as if they " own " them. Which is kind of interesting . It suggests that the Pope in effect owns items of a Satanic nature.

Goodness knows what goes through Catholics minds when they go to visit their Pope and little do they know perhaps that beneath him is a pagan site .They are too trusting and idealistic.
edit on 14-4-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 01:16 PM
link   
reply to post by tinhattribunal
 


This means what? I am unclear what your qoute was getting at.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 01:35 PM
link   
The premis is wrong. The Vatican was built on the site where St. Peter was buried, which was then just outside the city limits. The fact that the site was a "pagan" burial site prior is immaterial. The way it went down was that once St. Peter was buried, other Christians wanted to be buried as close to St. Peter as possible. Indeed, that's how they "found" him (It's not been proven 100%.) The caskets of subsequent burials radiate from this central location in all directions. I've been down in there. There's a whole city beneath St. Peter's along with a lot of dead popes. There has been a church at the site since Emperor Constantine's time, which was several hundred years AFTER St. Peter died. St. Peter's was built on top of a Christian burial ground, not a pagan one.

Yes, it's true that subsequent religions, including Christianity, commonly build on the older religion's sites, but if this is what they were doing, St. Peter's would have covered the Temple of Jupiter, which was the official religion of Rome before the Christians took over.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 01:46 PM
link   
reply to post by schuyler
 


Well the website I have given on first post has a virtual tour of the Vatican cemetry and within it is alot of occult symbolism.

I understand that they wanted to keep the site due to the fact that Popes have been buried there. .

I dont get however why they dont give up their pagan symbolism/ items.
Ie, remove the items. You know generally when we go somewhere we just remove what we dont like or think is part of our belief system.
edit on 14-4-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 02:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by FreedomEntered
reply to post by schuyler
 

I dont get however why they dont give up their pagan symbolism/ items.
Ie, remove the items. You know generally when we go somewhere we just remove what we dont like or think is part of our belief system.


It's to their credit that they did not, though I don't know how long access has been available down there. It's also additional proof that this wasn't your typical "cover and eradicate" approach to taking over from an old religion. This particular site was all about St. Paul--not about the old pagan religion.

It may be worth noting that the section where (they think they have) found St. Peter is in a much poorer section with just a jumble of caskets seemingly strewn about. The fancy necropolis itself has many tombs with rooms in them that the family of the deceased would visit once a year and party, pouring liquid refreshments down tubes to where they actual bodies lied to offer them refreshments.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 02:56 PM
link   
reply to post by schuyler
 


You mean its irrelevant that pagan objects exist within the Vatican? And that it was built on a child sacrifice site?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 03:12 PM
link   
reply to post by FreedomEntered
 


You mean its irrelevant that pagan objects exist within the Vatican? And that it was built on a child sacrifice site?

Sorry, I don't follow your reasoning. The Vatican contains many objects from before the time of Christ. Should they get rid of them all? Those objects are historic, and valuable for learning about ourselves. Should Christians burn their copies of The Illiad and The Odyssey because Homer was a pagan? Nonsense.

If you show me Vatican priests worshipping pagan objects or evil spirits, then I'll be worried.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 03:44 PM
link   
reply to post by charles1952
 


I think the preservation of historical sites as they are is fine. I dont see what the objects and items/symbols have to do with the Vatican however. To me its like Jews keeping Muslim relics. Why not return them to muslims? Since the symbolism was intended to be appreciated by them.

I mean for example they believe Jesus was divine but in the burial chambers they keep - there he is merely depicted as a sun god.

To me this seems like a contradiction.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:15 PM
link   


If you show me Vatican priests worshipping pagan objects or evil spirits, then I'll be worried.

Idolatry is rampant in the Roman Catholic Church. Statues abound in the Vatican, and in most traditional Catholic churches. The veneration - even worship of saints - is a large part of Catholicism. Catholics have their own justifications for the use of statues, but nevertheless, they violate the First Commandment through their usage.

The Church calls their saints "intercessors", but this is - with some minor exceptions - generally considered a violation of the reverence due to G-d alone as demonstrated in the Old Testament time and time again.

As far as "paganism" is concerned, there is only a thin veneer of Christ and Christ's teachings within Catholicism itself. After Constantine the sun-worshiper made Christianity the state religion of his time, Christianity adopted many, many of the pagan symbols, feast days, etc. into the new state religion. If you carefully study Catholicism, you will find many of the rituals, statues, and feast days are of pagan origin with a thin veneer of Christianity attached.

Christ was a Torah observant Jew. He would be appalled at the use of idols (statues), rosaries, and pagan practices that are both non-biblical and the complete opposite of traditional Jewish values and teachings.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:49 PM
link   
reply to post by CookieMonster09
 


Thats what I was thinking thats a different practice of Christianity than the one that Jesus shared with his followers. It could be that the Jesus followers who entered Rome were seeking to convert people to a more organised religion than the one that Jesus himself practiced. And used the poor to gain notoriety. I mean initially it was the poor who converted to Christianity. And then the Roman Catholic belief became a hybrid of Paganism and really used Christian elements.

If you look at it to this day, Christians and catholics have done very little for those suffering, often times they have been the ones persecuting others. I think the Roman Catholics keep the pagan relics because they themselves built their views upon them.

The desperation for people to believe in something was the Roman Catholics religion vice. So I wonder was it just a bunch of preists/popes who began to merge paganism with Jesus type beliefs?

Or did they already " prefer" paganism but wanted to create this new empire/religion.

I think too the grandeur ie, the building of the vatican, michealangleo etc was testament to their egos.
edit on 14-4-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 07:08 PM
link   


Thats what I was thinking thats a different practice of Christianity than the one that Jesus shared with his followers.

Correct. Yeshua was a Torah observant Jew, as were all of his followers. They did not pray the Rosary, they didn't worship at statues, and they never celebrated Sunday as the Sabbath. They did not celebrate Christmas nor Easter. They didn't have a dictatorial papacy in Rome, either.

If people want to actually live and pray like Yeshua, they would likely need to convert to one of the strands of Judaism.



If you look at it to this day, Christians and catholics have done very little for those suffering, often times they have been the ones persecuting others.


The Vatican has done little, but the people on the ground - the nameless nuns, priests, and monks have all done enormous amounts of charitable work for the poor and dispossessed. They represent the real Church, not the Vatican.

edit on 14-4-2013 by CookieMonster09 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 07:26 AM
link   
reply to post by FreedomEntered
 


Who really cares? It´s all just myths anyway.

The vatican is bad enough without the influence of the dark lord himself anyway.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 07:39 AM
link   
reply to post by Nightaudit
 


Well I tend to care what religions influence and therefore effect peoples life as it has a ripple effect. I mean, you have to be abit watchful.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 01:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by FreedomEntered
reply to post by schuyler
 


You mean its irrelevant that pagan objects exist within the Vatican? And that it was built on a child sacrifice site?


Basically, yes. St Peter's Basilica (which later became the foundation of the Vatican) was built on the site of St. Peter's burial on purpose because his grave was considered consecrated ground, as I stated above. My guess is they did not pay attention to much else. "Child sacrifice"? My! It's only later generations that people became obsessed with this sort of stuff. That is, unless you buy off on some sort of Illuminati Masonic NWO secret plot.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 12:09 AM
link   
reply to post by FreedomEntered
 

Dear FreedomEntered,

First, thank you. Second, I fouled up. Thanks for providing the link to the tour of the Necropolis. It was tremendously impressive and well done. I have to admit (shamefully) that I just finished taking the virtual tour.

Now a question or two. Where are all the pagan objects? Where are all the pagan symbols? Sure, I know that some people think halos are sun worship signs, but I don't think that's the case. I did see a depiction of Lucifer. Do you think that is a pagan symbol?

I just didn't see what you might have seen, or are we talking about a different part of the Vatican? The Necropolis seems to be one of the historical sites that should be preserved, as you say.

With respect,
Charles1952

P.s. What Muslim relics? Wasn't the first Muslim relic about 700 years after Christ? I didn't think the Necropolis was that recent. - C -



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 12:22 AM
link   
reply to post by charles1952
 


Yeah, I also peaked on the virtual tour. Well Pagan as in having many Gods/Goddesses.
Its Roman relics specificially and they did try to appease the Gods/Goddesses so they created images of them through sculpture/painting.

Sorry I was making the comparison that Id find it abit odd if say a Buddhist moved to a location and found Muslim relics and didnt remove them and return them to the Islamic Imams but instead kept them.

But as someone pointed out they conquered Pagans, at least in their mind, and so this might be common for places of aboding Christians preisthood to live on child sacrifice sites and so forth.
edit on 16-4-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)



  exclusive video


top topics
 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join