France bans ketchup from schools and colleges to promote healthy eating and preserve food culture.

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posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:22 AM
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I came across this old newspiece from 2011. I thought it would be an interesting share here, as I did not find any other thread about it.

I sincerely hope this is the right subforum for it
I though quite a bit where to put it as it is an older newspiece, although after consulting in chat, I decided to go with education as culture/healthy eating promotion in schools can considered to be a part of education




The French government announced that starting this week, ketchup will no longer be allowed in any school or university cafeteria in an effort to promote healthy eating, as well as protect the country’s distinguished gourmet cuisine from disappearing beneath the American-conceived product—in both the literal and metaphoric sense.

"We have to stop children from being able to serve those sauces,” said Christophe Hebert, chairman of the National Association of Directors of Collective Restaurants and the man behind the ketchup ban. “Children have a tendency to use them to mask the taste of whatever they are eating.”

Hebert fears that the use of ketchup (and other condiments) desensitizes children from the gourmet essence of French cuisine, jeopardizing the future of the country’s classic recipes.

"Canteens have a public health mission and also an educative mission. We have to ensure that children become familiar with French recipes so that they can hand them down to the following generation," he told

"France must be an example to the world in the quality of its food, starting with its children," said Bruno Le Maire, the agriculture and food minister.

"Six million children eat in canteens every day, but 1 in 2 of them is still hungry when they leave," he said. "Nutritional rules are neither applied or controlled. We are making them obligatory and we will be keeping an eye on the menus."

Le Maire said the changes were introduced because common sense rules on nutrition have not been followed in the nation's schools.

Requiring cafeteria food to be served ketchup-free isn’t the only change students will experience at lunchtime. The new regulations also require schools to offer four to five different dishes each day, which includes a starter dish, main course, at least one dairy product (such as yogurt or cheesedessert, and healthy sides such as broccoli or spinach. There will be no limitations on bread, however, as baguettes must be available in an unlimited supply.

The rules leave young ketchup lovers here little choice. French schoolchildren are not allowed to bring home-prepared lunches to school and must either eat in the cafeteria or go home for lunch.

"They need to know that in France food means conviviality, sharing and having a good time at the table," Hebert said. “We absolutely have to stop children from being able to serve those sorts of sauces to themselves with every meal.”

But not all meals have to remain "sans ketchup." There is one exception: Students are allowed to eat ketchup once a week with—of all foods—French fries, which are also served only once per week.




articles.latimes.com...
www.neontommy.com...
www.telegraph.co.uk...

www.nydailynews.com...

I personally like such law and would like something like that also introduced here. When I was in school, I remember kids eating everything with ketchup. It kills the sense of taste in foods.

The French people I know are very proud over their cuisines - after all French are known to be a gourmet nation.

The government is also doing good job in that area
After that particular law also mayonnaise, salad dressings were banned from schools. Sugary drinks and sodas are also taxed.
edit on 14-4-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:49 AM
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France bans ketchup from schools


I remember this OUTRAGE bit of garbage journalism when it first came out and how it completely misrepresented the facts.

Ketchup isnt banned.

What they actually did was to decide that ALL sauces (not just ketchup) were to be properly associated with the meal in question, and that students couldnt just "free for all" slop whatever sauce they wanted in any amounts on any thing, as they had been doing in the past.

If the school serves something that goes with ketchup, then ketchup will be supplied.
The same would be true of any sauce you name.

---

Edit - this link goes to a French article written at the time...


Salt and sauces, for against, will not be freely available but served based dishes.


edit on 14-4-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:51 AM
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haha tomato sauce sandwiches I haven't had them for ages.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:58 AM
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Some people have way too much free money and time, this is the
biggest waste of resources and a worthless outcome lmao, i really
cannot fathom why anyone thinks they should be able to dictate HOW
or WHAT to eat.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:58 AM
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i gotta say this. if people are putting on ketchup (or other sauce/relish) to keep from tasting something, doesn't that mean they think whatever it is tastes like crap in the first place?
perhaps instead of "banning it " from general use they would have thought to make better food. just because you call something "gourmet" doesn't mean it tastes good. in fact when i was younger i thought that "gourmet" was a polite way of saying bad tasting food, since just about every "gourmet" food i have tried tastes like crap.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:08 AM
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Originally posted by alfa1

France bans ketchup from schools


I remember this OUTRAGE bit of garbage journalism when it first came out and how it completely misrepresented the facts.

Ketchup isnt banned.

What they actually did was to decide that ALL sauces (not just ketchup) were to be properly associated with the meal in question, and that students couldnt just "free for all" slop whatever sauce they wanted in any amounts on any thing, as they had been doing in the past.

If the school serves something that goes with ketchup, then ketchup will be supplied.
The same would be true of any sauce you name.

---

Ketchup is only allowed with fries though and these are served once a week though, one every other food it is not allowed. At least that is what friend who is an exchange student in Paris told me. Just asked her like 5 minutes ago.

I do not know details about other sauces and salt though, although these are allowed with certain foods just like ketchup is allowed with fries.
edit on 14-4-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by generik
i gotta say this. if people are putting on ketchup (or other sauce/relish) to keep from tasting something, doesn't that mean they think whatever it is tastes like crap in the first place?
perhaps instead of "banning it " from general use they would have thought to make better food. just because you call something "gourmet" doesn't mean it tastes good. in fact when i was younger i thought that "gourmet" was a polite way of saying bad tasting food, since just about every "gourmet" food i have tried tastes like crap.


To be honest, schools foods are not that bad usually as far as I have eaten in different countries. Although kids are picky and they are becoming pickier and pickier. Even home it is not often easy to get them eating vegetables, broccoli.

I remember at my school the foods were actually quite good. Of course I was more used to home foods, although these were not bad there. Still lots of kids hated school foods and decided to get a burger instead from the shop nearby... or put extreme amounts of ketchup or mayonnese on their foods and still left half of their food left...

It is funny to see many kids eating nowadays. Picking out all the stuff they don´t like and eating only things they like. It is a waste of food and shows no respect towards the food. It is really uncommon seeing kids pick out broccoli, onions and certain other vegetables out of their food...



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:25 AM
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Personally...at least in the U.S., I think the micromanagement would have George Orwell shaking his head and reading 1984 as a book describing the good old days when things were free.

Promoting, encouraging and such are interesting terms to use....and it's creative when promotion suggests choice in some form. Dictate by the full force of law isn't promoting...it's ordering that this shall be done or else?

When did it get to where everything that may be a decent idea (and the concept here actually DOES sound decent) needed a law with all the power and intrusion by force that carries with it? An alternative could always be something kids hate to do. Work. Put the Ketchup and other "contraband" sauces a good distance away from the immediate eating area and requiring a whole separate special trip to get up and go fetch. 1 per student, so each has to get their own with the work to do it. I'll bet useage also falls quickly and without another way to have life ruled by a law book.

Yikes..... Is there anything that a law shouldn't be passed and enforced for? Illegal condiments? Really?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:29 AM
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Originally posted by Cabin

Originally posted by alfa1

France bans ketchup from schools


I remember this OUTRAGE bit of garbage journalism when it first came out and how it completely misrepresented the facts.

Ketchup isnt banned.

What they actually did was to decide that ALL sauces (not just ketchup) were to be properly associated with the meal in question, and that students couldnt just "free for all" slop whatever sauce they wanted in any amounts on any thing, as they had been doing in the past.

If the school serves something that goes with ketchup, then ketchup will be supplied.
The same would be true of any sauce you name.

---

Ketchup is only allowed with fries though and these are served once a week though, one every other food it is not allowed. At least that is what friend who is an exchange student in Paris told me. Just asked her like 5 minutes ago.

I do not know details about other sauces and salt though, although these are allowed with certain foods just like ketchup is allowed with fries.
edit on 14-4-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)


Heres some first hand experience from you taking into consideration that i live in France.

At the school for which one of my sons still goes to, they are still allowed ketchup with fries once a week.

This allows for the kids to be encouraged to extend their tastes for more tradional foods and sauces and to eat healthier foods. Most school canteens also when possible try and opt for local produce and when possible Bio products.

As the French culture has very strong gastronomic values this also allows for the culture to not completely disappear.

As for sauces and salts, these are always available although the sauces are nearly always "home made" so to speak, especially vinaigrette which is the main sauce for salads.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:30 AM
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Another human rights violation.

Who the fark to say what they eat and sh!t ? Not me and you nor the French government.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:36 AM
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Originally posted by mypan
Another human rights violation.

Who the fark to say what they eat and sh!t ? Not me and you nor the French government.


That was a deeply intelligent and well thought out remark mypan, it must have taken you a while to write that, would you care to elaborate?

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:39 AM
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I never heard of this, but it doesn't surprise me.

The french really take their food and mealtimes seriously.
Meals can take hours, and are, as the article mention, convival- it is a time for lively discussion.

They consider foods an important part of cultural identity, and even different regions are known for their regional dishes, and the difference between one regional speciality and another and another might be minor- the way it is cooked, or one ingredient, but to them that it is an essential difference that needs to be taken into consideration.

When I first moved here, I thought everything was bland. It actually took me a while to have my sense of taste become more sensitive. Whenever I go back to America, people want me to cook french food for them, but frankly, I don't want to. They never appreciate it. They can't tell the difference between one herb and another, and aren't happy unless it is covered in sauces which completely drown out the nature of the ingredients used!

You can use low quality products, bad meat, tasteless vegetables, and they can't tell because of all the other stuff on top of it.

I just ate my lunch- one Beef heart tomato straight out of the garden, with a drizzle of olive oil (from a friends olive trees), and two eggs from my neighbors chickens, and then a goat milk yogurt with nothing added.
These products are of excellent quality, but if I put sauces on them, I wouldn't be able to tell the difference between them and their industrialized, greenhoused, low quality processed cousins.



I have come to appreciate their point of view on this, and the american idea that kids should be left to do whatever they please, as a part of individualism sometimes amounts to leaving your kids at the mercy of of big corporations and industries that can control and manipulate them through things like sugar addiction.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:42 AM
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For Non US people...what exactly is "Ketchup"? and Jelly in Peanut butter and "Jelly"?

We use Tomato Sauce, Chutney, Jam, Marmalade, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Pickles, Gherkins and other English delicacies, but ketchup has always baffled me.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:44 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


The schools have really good meals, don't they??

I was always really impressed with my kids meals there. They sit down at round tables, with cloth napkins, and are served each individual course one after the other, and are obligated to eat really good quality foods.
I was thankful that a lot of vegetables they first tasted at school and developed a taste for them. My kids would come home and tell me how they loved something like gratin de choufleur, and ask me to make it.... and I kept thinking, if it hadn't been for school we'd probably never eat such things at home!

I know the school in our village now only serves bio- or organic, products now too.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:45 AM
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Originally posted by Bluesma
I never heard of this, but it doesn't surprise me.

The french really take their food and mealtimes seriously.
Meals can take hours, and are, as the article mention, convival- it is a time for lively discussion.

They consider foods an important part of cultural identity, and even different regions are known for their regional dishes, and the difference between one regional speciality and another and another might be minor- the way it is cooked, or one ingredient, but to them that it is an essential difference that needs to be taken into consideration.

When I first moved here, I thought everything was bland. It actually took me a while to have my sense of taste become more sensitive. Whenever I go back to America, people want me to cook french food for them, but frankly, I don't want to. They never appreciate it. They can't tell the difference between one herb and another, and aren't happy unless it is covered in sauces which completely drown out the nature of the ingredients used!

You can use low quality products, bad meat, tasteless vegetables, and they can't tell because of all the other stuff on top of it.

I just ate my lunch- one Beef heart tomato straight out of the garden, with a drizzle of olive oil (from a friends olive trees), and two eggs from my neighbors chickens, and then a goat milk yogurt with nothing added.
These products are of excellent quality, but if I put sauces on them, I wouldn't be able to tell the difference between them and their industrialized, greenhoused, low quality processed cousins.



I have come to appreciate their point of view on this, and the american idea that kids should be left to do whatever they please, as a part of individualism sometimes amounts to leaving your kids at the mercy of of big corporations and industries that can control and manipulate them through things like sugar addiction.



I have been here for over 25 years now... and have completely adopted the French styme of living AND especially eating... If i am correct... lucky you for living in the South (yum yum, those olives
)

I lived in the South for about 15years and am now in the center but go down quite often with my job to the South coast, my favoutite dish Carpaccio of Salmon with fine herbs and olive oil)...

Well, back to the first BBQ of the year for me.

Kindest respects and bon appetit

Rodinus



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:47 AM
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reply to post by gort51
 


They use American style Ketchup- Heinz is popular. They have all the other sorts too, but traditionally a sauce is handmade fresh to go with a specific dish.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:56 AM
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I had to smile when i saw this-the healthy eating part-here in South Africa we have a brand of ketchup-we call it tomato sauce-that is so pure and healthy,along with bread to smear it on,it could propably keep you alive and healthier than canned meats,to name one type of survival food.South Africans will know,All Gold in the glass bottle-its one of the few things that has kept up it's standard of quality through all the years.Very healthy indeed.

Ketchup in general,can be very overpowering to the taste of food,but i think it's absurd to ban it.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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Originally posted by Rodinus

Originally posted by mypan
Another human rights violation.

Who the fark to say what they eat and sh!t ? Not me and you nor the French government.


That was a deeply intelligent and well thought out remark mypan, it must have taken you a while to write that, would you care to elaborate?

Kindest respects

Rodinus





Why something as basic as food, the government has to poke their head into ? It's the little bit of freedom that they are taking away, a little at a time and next, what else ? Maybe they are going to forbid you wearing black in the morning ?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 06:17 AM
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Originally posted by mypan

Originally posted by Rodinus

Originally posted by mypan
Another human rights violation.

Who the fark to say what they eat and sh!t ? Not me and you nor the French government.


That was a deeply intelligent and well thought out remark mypan, it must have taken you a while to write that, would you care to elaborate?

Kindest respects

Rodinus





Why something as basic as food, the government has to poke their head into ? It's the little bit of freedom that they are taking away, a little at a time and next, what else ? Maybe they are going to forbid you wearing black in the morning ?



Thanks for your remark mypan,

If you lived in France and knew how things work over here you would notice that there is a MASSIVE financial hole in the social security system which is getting larger and larger each year... (Health care over here is practically free for everyone and France is known to have one of the best health care systems in the world)... not to mention that a small percentage of our wages over here contribute to public health spending.

If this decision was made, it was not only to encourage and educate our future generation(s) into keeping the culture alive, but also to encourage healthier eating, (whilst still enjoying what is on the plate) and reduce public money being wasted in the long run for obesity and bad food health related problems.

Might be a different thing where you live but this is the way it is here and the French population in general have no issues with this.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 06:32 AM
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I don't really see this as government control, and if the people in France like it, the kids are eating healthy and thier culture is presserved, sounds great to me.

I don't see it as much different then people in the USA wanting to presserve our customs for our Children...





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