Top Secret NSA 5 Zettabyte SPY building "Perfect Surveillence State" Near Completion

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posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by MaxSteiner
Correct me if I'm wrong, but this computer isn't about collecting more information, its about storing information they already collect isn't it?


Well, if you spot something interesting, it can be real informative to be able to look back a few months and see what else you've been up to that might have been missed. Also what your known associates have been up to.



Echelons been replaced, but that was already collecting a fairly sizable amount of all transmissions around the globe - you'd have to imagine whatever its been replaced with is up to near 100%.


Who told you that?




posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 10:52 PM
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This is just bad for American democracy, but apparently not everyone can see that. The government itself, not to mention individual sections of the government like the NSA, were NOT supposed to have as much power as it does now. The people were supposed to have certain rights that were non-negotiable, and that cannot be infringed upon. Everyone should be in an uproar over the things that have already occurred, if not decades ago, at least during the last four presidential terms. When the government gets a little more power, it is exponentially more difficult to take it away from them. Peoples' rights are violated to the extreme every single day in this country. I cannot be the only one who sees a problem with that fact.

The government never was supposed to be able to monitor citizens without due process and probable cause. Now it seems that simply disagreeing with the government is grounds for your rights to be taken away. This is ridiculous, and they lie to us and say it is for our protection and safety. How is that argument even sold to the masses, considering it is ludicrous? The government poses a much greater threat to our rights than any individual or terrorist group ever could, because they have the ability to suppress the population without violence. This is why it is so important that we fight for our 2nd amendment right, because one day it might be necessary to use that right in the manner it was intended. That day is surely approaching quickly, as the US gets more corrupt every year, and corporate interests supersede the interests of the people.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 09:42 AM
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Only 5 Zettabytes
According to this article it's a Yottabyte!

www.wired.com...




Given the facility’s scale and the fact that a terabyte of data can now be stored on a flash drive the size of a man’s pinky, the potential amount of information that could be housed in Bluffdale is truly staggering. But so is the exponential growth in the amount of intelligence data being produced every day by the eavesdropping sensors of the NSA and other intelligence agencies. As a result of this “expanding array of theater airborne and other sensor networks,” as a 2007 Department of Defense report puts it, the Pentagon is attempting to expand its worldwide communications network, known as the Global Information Grid, to handle yottabytes (1024 bytes) of data. (A yottabyte is a septillion bytes—so large that no one has yet coined a term for the next higher magnitude.)

It needs that capacity because, according to a recent report by Cisco, global Internet traffic will quadruple from 2010 to 2015, reaching 966 exabytes per year. (A million exabytes equal a yottabyte.) In terms of scale, Eric Schmidt, Google’s former CEO, once estimated that the total of all human knowledge created from the dawn of man to 2003 totaled 5 exabytes. And the data flow shows no sign of slowing. In 2011 more than 2 billion of the world’s 6.9 billion people were connected to the Internet. By 2015, market research firm IDC estimates, there will be 2.7 billion users. Thus, the NSA’s need for a 1-million-square-foot data storehouse. Should the agency ever fill the Utah center with a yottabyte of information, it would be equal to about 500 quintillion (500,000,000,000,000,000,000) pages of text.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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So be it. None of are in control and if someone wishes to attain that level of power then I bid them a farewell.
edit on 15-4-2013 by kyleabent because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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The NSA are the same people who failed to mention to other agencies (CIA) that they had substantial information on the 9/11 hijackers living in the United States. They never bothered to tell anyone that hijackers living in the U.S. were communicating with OBL's terrorists in Yemen. The failures go on and on and on. Additionally, then-Director Michael Hayden and NSA have never been held accountable for these failures. In fact, Hayden was promoted to CIA director. Gotta love it! These guys are a terrorist's dream!! NSA laid all the ground work for the 9/11 hijackers.

I wouldn't worry too much about these guys or their tech
edit on 15-4-2013 by Cosmic911 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by Cosmic911
The NSA are the same people who failed to mention to other agencies (CIA) that they had substantial information on the 9/11 hijackers living in the United States. They never bothered to tell anyone that hijackers living in the U.S. were communicating with OBL's terrorists in Yemen. The failures go on and on and on. Additionally, then-Director Michael Hayden and NSA have never been held accountable for these failures. In fact, Hayden was promoted to CIA director. Gotta love it! These guys are a terrorist's dream!! NSA laid all the ground work for the 9/11 hijackers.

I wouldn't worry too much about these guys or their tech


There's a lot of issues with trading info around between agencies. You don't just call up the Agency and say "Hey, we have some info you might want. I'll zip it right over". That's some of the arsepain of compartmentalization and a raft of NSSIDs, some conflicting. It's sort of like getting unreduced recon imaging from NRO, you can't just drive over and give them your CAC.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


So you're saying there are nooooooooo mechanisms in place for an agency like NSA to make the appropriate notifications to appropriate agencies (like the CIA)? So please tell me what they're supposed to do with all that wire-taping and hours and hours of listening? Please



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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Turnkey ??? For us non-US speakers, what does that mean in this context?



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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This state of the art system primarily deals with exchanges like this:

"what's up man?"

"Nutn, whatup you?"

"just chilln."

"uh huh, me too."

"cool"

"yeh I knw."

And on and on and on. Hardly the words of Jefferson. They also get to pour though millions of transactions for porn, pot, diapers, soap, vitamins, electronic devices used for spying. Again, hardly the mark of a well armed militia. What possible use can all of this be to the common pocket-protector wearing g-man? None. They work for the machine that encases us all, this information is for that machine to learn more how to control us, it does so by reading all of those pointless text messages and decides how best to control us. Judging by the average text message I'm guessing said beast is doing a fine job.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by Cosmic911
reply to post by Bedlam
 


So you're saying there are nooooooooo mechanisms in place for an agency like NSA to make the appropriate notifications to appropriate agencies (like the CIA)? So please tell me what they're supposed to do with all that wire-taping and hours and hours of listening? Please


Oh, there ARE, of course. Given the right set of circumstances, you could in fact get NRO data. If you ask for it, and if you're qualified to get it, they've even added in a way to ask for specific types of imagery if the circumstances come up, that's a BIG improvement, but doesn't always work.

But volunteering info from agency to agency has always been an issue. There was an issue some years back over at NSA where they intercepted some phone traffic between a congresscritter and some overseas folk, wherein the congresscritter was spilling some classified beans to an unqualified FORN. So it was kicked up and down the command chain, the director decided that they didn't have any directive that covered it and it was dropped for months.

So yeah, there are lots of ways that NSA can collect data they can't disseminate under law or whatever relevant NSSID is in the way.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by Cinrad
Turnkey ??? For us non-US speakers, what does that mean in this context?


Means 'ready to operate', as in all you have to do is walk in and turn the key.

It can also mean a low level security officer, the sort that has to carry around a time clock and insert a key at each checkpoint to prove he's not loafing, but probably not in this context.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by crankyoldman
This state of the art system primarily deals with exchanges like this:

"what's up man?"


And that's true. However, what it's basically for is when some exchange is NOT that sort of thing. And then the question becomes, what has this guy/group been doing for the last six months, and that's where this installation comes in.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 




Oh, there ARE, of course.

Of course there are. I would hope two agencies such as CIA and NSA could figure out how to communicate with each other. I would also hope they could recognize the importance of doing this well.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam

Originally posted by crankyoldman
This state of the art system primarily deals with exchanges like this:

"what's up man?"


And that's true. However, what it's basically for is when some exchange is NOT that sort of thing. And then the question becomes, what has this guy/group been doing for the last six months, and that's where this installation comes in.


This is what they are telling you it is for, what they are storing is everything, everywhere, anytime, which, given the enormous nature of that information suggest it is for another reason - and it is. If one belongs to this site, the must surely understand that the given reason for anything covert is never the reason, it is only the justification for the "permission" and the money. The reason is way, way beyond the .00000000000000000001 percent of the population that MIGHT be a "person of interest."



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


What causes a lot of issues is that a lot of NSAs stuff is compartmentalized. That SCI designator changes things. It really gets in the way with tech projects. If I'm read onto project A and project B, if they're in separate compartments or command chains, even if it's the same service branch or company, I can't disseminate knowledge across project or compartment bounds. So if Joe solves an issue and Phil is still struggling with it I can't even tell them the thing's already been designed down the hall.

NSA and others compartmentalize not only intel but it's also compartmented under the means of collection, in case the nature of the intel compromises the means of collecting it. So you've got strict limits on how you disseminate it by compartment, there's also need to know issues. How it gets moved from one to the other agency involves moving it up the chain to the top then back down, you can't lateral it.

It's not idiocy as much as bureaucracy and the nature of SCI projects.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 04:33 AM
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Originally posted by crankyoldman

This is what they are telling you it is for, what they are storing is everything, everywhere, anytime, which, given the enormous nature of that information suggest it is for another reason - and it is.


The problem being, you don't know who the subjects of interest are until after the fact. Then you don't have the back story. This thing provides a sliding window of data history. It doesn't store everything forever, you'd have a tough time with that. It's like Wayback Machine on steroids.

It also gives you that magic way of getting a retroactive FISA. The system might collect data from you, but if it's never examined, it's sort of like Schrodinger's email - it hasn't been surveilled until someone looks at it. Should you promote yourself to 'person of interest', then your last few months of activity are there for a court order to reveal.



posted on Apr, 17 2013 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by 33vibe


This new NSA spy station has been photographed from the air by helicopter and it is big. It seems to be our new national security epicenter which is meant to "protect the American people"... just how much will they be protecting us from ourselves is the question. With storage capacities approximated at about 5 zetabytes it would likely have the most advanced computing capabilities and the means to keep and monitor data on EVERY ONE. From the site:

Fellow NSA whistleblower Bill Binney, who worked at the NSA for nearly four decades, says it's about the possibility that the government's stunning new capacity to collect, store and analyze data could be abused.

"It's really a-- turnkey situation, where it could be turned quickly and become a totalitarian state pretty quickly," he said. "The capacities to do that is being set up. Now it's a question of if we get the wrong person in office, or if certain people set up their network internally in government, they could make that happen quickly."

According to NSA's chief compliance officer John Delong, whose job is to make sure the laws and policies designed to protect the privacy of U.S. persons is being enforced, part of the frustration is that the rules are specific and secret.


Read more: www.foxnews.com...

Follow the link to see the exclusive photos and read the full article.


There was also a NSA "data center" built in San Antonio back in 2009 or so. Granted, not as big as the one in Camp Williams. But it's "Alamo dome" size according to reports.

That one pretty much flew under the radar.

It was part of Hayden's post 9/11 planning, don't keep all of NSA's "eggs in one basket" i.e. Fort Meade. Plus they've pretty much max'd out the power grid there with all their buildings, super computers, etc. Also Texas has really cheap power and the Utah site will have it's own power plant.





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