Have you taken the GRE test?

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posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:22 AM
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If so, any advice for preparing for it? I purchased a Kaplan study guide with practice tests, and intend to use that as my primary study guide. Are there any other supplementary study materials you might suggest? I was thinking about the vocabulary flashcards, but English is (usually) my strongest area so I'm not really sure if that's necessary.

I'm really worried about the Math portions, I have always just barely scraped by my math courses.

I need to do amazingly well on the test in an attempt to negate a slightly low GPA in order to be considered for a graduate degree program. I would appreciate any courteous advice!




posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


I took mine back in 1990.

First rule of fight clu- I mean GRE, don't panic If you have a solid background, you'll do fine. Don't let it freak you out.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


Thanks Beezer. I'm not freaking too much about anything other than the math part. I do NOT have a solid math background. I've always taken the bare minimum, lowest level math courses I could get away with. Even with tutors holding my hand, I've always been very lucky to get a C.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


I took algebra, analytical trig, calculus, and statistics as an undergrad. Then again, it was so long ago, I can't remember.

Focus on the practice tests, the pre tests and find out where your weaknesses are.

Once you do, get a tutor for a week.

How much time until the exam?



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


I took mine a few years ago but apparently the test has changed since then so I can't really talk about specifics of the current test. What I can say is just go through the book and practice. Especially with the math. What you'll realize as you go through the book is that you don't really need to know the math. You just need to be able to recognize certain kinds of problems and then remember the tricks the book gives you for those specific types of problems. If you get these tricks down you can generally get rid of a few answers as soon as you look at the problem which in turn greatly increases your chances of getting it right.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:50 AM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


I can schedule it at any time, but I am hoping to take it around the first week of June. This way I have time to retake before the grad application package is due (in case I don't score high enough).



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


That's great advice, thank you!
2nd

edit on 13-4-2013 by MojaveBurning because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 03:47 PM
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I took mine in 1994, before a computerized test. I think I only did ok on it, but still got accepted into several programs. (My field was philosophy and linguistics). What type of program are you applying for? There might be a subject exam as well.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 04:10 PM
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Well there are many graduate programs that don't require you to take the GRE but I'm sure you've already checked that.

I'm a bit confused as to what you think doing well on the GRE will do in regards to a low GPA however?



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by Toromos
I took mine in 1994, before a computerized test. I think I only did ok on it, but still got accepted into several programs. (My field was philosophy and linguistics). What type of program are you applying for? There might be a subject exam as well.


PhD Clinical Psychology. There is an optional subject exam in psychology, which I intend to take as well to strengthen my application.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:30 AM
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It's been many years, similar to Beezzer, back in the early 90's. I got extremely close to a perfect score, but the writing portion knocked me out of it (of all things).

The best advice I can give for preparation would be Khanacademy.org

although they don't have a "GRE" section, if you use the SAT prep section, it can help considerably. Most of the standardized tests are quite similar. It may be good to follow up with the GMAT afterwards. Good luck!



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



You must be applying to a top tier school then. I've luckily never had to take this test with either of my degrees but I wish you the best of luck.

And try and keep that GPA up
edit on 14-4-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



Very similar to High School GPA vs the SAT or ACT score. They realize that classroom grades aren't always indicative of what you know or are capable of, especially with all the NCLB .... crap.....Grades are inflated or dependent on classroom participation instead of mastery of the subject which is a huge joke. I could get off on a tangent about how horrible the NCLB has been for public schools and how it's destroying them but I'll stop here as to not derail the thread.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



You must be applying to a top tier school then. I've luckily never had to take this test with either of my degrees but I wish you the best of luck.

And try and keep that GPA up
edit on 14-4-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)


Anything beyond the Associates or Bachelor's (getting your Master's) requires the GRE


It stand for "Graduate Requisite Exam" and is used for admittance to Graduate School (beyond Bachelors)

edit on 14-4-2013 by kthxbai because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by kthxbai

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



You must be applying to a top tier school then. I've luckily never had to take this test with either of my degrees but I wish you the best of luck.

And try and keep that GPA up
edit on 14-4-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)


Anything beyond the Associates or Bachelor's (getting your Master's) requires the GRE


It stand for "Graduate Requisite Exam" and is used for admittance to Graduate School (beyond Bachelors)

edit on 14-4-2013 by kthxbai because: (no reason given)


Not for me it wasn't.

Maybe they forgot I needed to take it than.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by kthxbai

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



You must be applying to a top tier school then. I've luckily never had to take this test with either of my degrees but I wish you the best of luck.

And try and keep that GPA up
edit on 14-4-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)


Anything beyond the Associates or Bachelor's (getting your Master's) requires the GRE


It stand for "Graduate Requisite Exam" and is used for admittance to Graduate School (beyond Bachelors)

edit on 14-4-2013 by kthxbai because: (no reason given)


Not for me it wasn't.

Maybe they forgot I needed to take it than.


For a Masters? Was it a standard University? It's pretty much required nation-wide.



posted on Apr, 14 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by kthxbai

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by kthxbai

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by MojaveBurning
reply to post by Hopechest
 


For a couple of the schools I am looking at, the admissions requirements suggest that those with a low GPA but high GRE scores should proceed with the application process, because the GRE scores may help to demonstrate the academic potential that the low GPA fails to reflect. Make sense?



You must be applying to a top tier school then. I've luckily never had to take this test with either of my degrees but I wish you the best of luck.

And try and keep that GPA up
edit on 14-4-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)


Anything beyond the Associates or Bachelor's (getting your Master's) requires the GRE


It stand for "Graduate Requisite Exam" and is used for admittance to Graduate School (beyond Bachelors)

edit on 14-4-2013 by kthxbai because: (no reason given)


Not for me it wasn't.

Maybe they forgot I needed to take it than.


For a Masters? Was it a standard University? It's pretty much required nation-wide.


Its not a federal requirement, its per university and yes I go to a real one. Maybe because I've always had a high GPA and have always made the Dean's List that they waived it.

Not sure, I just know they never said I had to take it when I applied to grad school.



posted on Apr, 15 2013 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


If your area is not directly related to math/science, you shouldn't stress out (too much) about the math score. That being said, study for it just the same. I regret that i didn't at all for the math portion (or the verbal portions), and when all that f of x and sine, cosine stuff started popping up on the computer screen I racked my brains for formulas I hadn't seen since high school. The only thing that saved me is I'm good at process of elimination. So, no matter how cocksure you are, study in whatever way works best for you...in a way it makes since because that's all grad school really is: learning autonomously. The professors aren't there to spew facts, they're their to coordinate and structure your path, you do the learning on your own.

This goes for your comp exams at the end (if applicable)....

Edit: also, what hope chest said above, know the reqs for the universities you are applying too. I just realized I'm going to have to retake them, they're only good for 5 years.

edit on 15-4-2013 by Sphota because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2013 @ 01:09 AM
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me no need this test...thanx..





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