The government wanting to keep dangerous asteroids secret? Not according to this article!

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posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 04:46 AM
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NASA needs help to hunt city-destroying asteroids, Congress says.

www.space.com...


It is time for the private sector to aid in the search for potentially city-destroying asteroids and meteors, lawmakers said during a hearing Wednesday (April 10).

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology made the call while hearing from NASA scientists and private-sector asteroid hunters during a hearing entitled "Threats from Space," with both groups agreeing that something more needs to be done.

"Detecting asteroids should not be the primary mission of NASA," Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, said at the hearing. "No doubt the private sector will play an important role as well. We must better recognize what the private sector can do to aid our efforts to protect the world."


It's been said in the past that NASA need help of amateur astronomers in finding and studying potentially dangerous asteroids. www.nasa.gov...

Looks like the Chelyabinsk meteor was a good wakeup call.




posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 05:11 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 





It is time for the private sector to aid in the search for potentially city-destroying asteroids and meteors, lawmakers said during a hearing Wednesday


Translated for ordinary people.




We are about to give multi billion dollar contracts to many of our favorite friends so they can hire a couple of people to look for rocks in the sky. My profits will soar and we have lots of excuses if we happen to miss something, which we will, because these two people will watch 100 TV screens at once. Yay for us.


P
edit on 13/4/2013 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 





Looks like the Chelyabinsk meteor was a good wakeup call.


Or they realized can't keep denying and ignoring what could happen anytime soon. Think about this :

It became frequent to hear or read news of asteroids passing by close to Earth. Everytime that happens, authorities say it won't hit us.

Didn't you wonder if they've been "selective", releasing this kind of information and restricting data about objects that may represent a threat to us.

That would be their only logical procedure to follow, considering political and economic reasons.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by wildespace
 





Looks like the Chelyabinsk meteor was a good wakeup call.


Or they realized can't keep denying and ignoring what could happen anytime soon. Think about this :

It became frequent to hear or read news of asteroids passing by close to Earth. Everytime that happens, authorities say it won't hit us.

Didn't you wonder if they've been "selective", releasing this kind of information and restricting data about objects that may represent a threat to us.

That would be their only logical procedure to follow, considering political and economic reasons.



RT news spent the whole day informing us of Asteroid Doomsday scenarios yesterday...and now the US.

Von Brauns instructions are being followed to the 'T' I see.

Aliens next folks! I'd say by about 2040-2060 we'll have 'Disclosure' by choice or not.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by wildespace
 

It became frequent to hear or read news of asteroids passing by close to Earth. Everytime that happens, authorities say it won't hit us.

Didn't you wonder if they've been "selective", releasing this kind of information and restricting data about objects that may represent a threat to us.


It doesn't work like that. Authorities aren't the ones looking for asteroids and anouncing them; the astronomers are (including the amateurs). Data about all discovered asteroids is available at the MPC, and anyone can make their own observations and calculations of the orbits. In case you didn't know, a lot of asteroids are discovered by the amateurs, who also calculate the orbit and anounce their findings on public forums/groups/blogs etc.

Here are a couple of Facebook groups where such findings are posted all the time:
International Near Earth Reporting Center
Comets and Asteroids

The articles I linked to actually proves my point: the authorities and the professional astronomers need our help. They wouldn't be asking for it if they wanted to keep potentially dangerous asteroids a secret.
edit on 13-4-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


It does work like that. Amateurs can spot asteroids but it's always official institutions behind. I do not accept any source as 100 % reliable, in any matter. That's why we are here in ATS. Not saying all that just because your sources are facebook accounts.
edit on 13-4-2013 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
...Think about this :

It became frequent to hear or read news of asteroids passing by close to Earth...


You are hearing about asteroids more frequently because people have been looking for them more fervently lately.

Before people started looking harder for asteroids, they mostly passed by without anyone knowing they existed at all (or even knowing that they passed by).



Everytime that happens, authorities say it won't hit us.


That makes sense to me, considering that it is VERY rare that a large one hits Earth. I suppose the last one in recorded history was Tunguska. Before that, I don't know what.

Considering the rarity of a large asteroid (or comet) hitting Earth, I would say that in the past ten+ years that we have been looking more fervently for NEOs (Near Earth Objects), the odds are that NONE of them would be a danger to Earth. Obviously those odds change as time progresses, so that's why an organized NEO survey is important.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 





That makes sense to me, considering that it is VERY rare that a large one hits Earth. I suppose the last one in recorded history was Tunguska. Before that, I don't know what.


I guess nobody told you about the one that touched down Russian land some weeks ago.

edit on 13-4-2013 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 12:42 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


I'm talking about asteroids/meteoroids/meteorites that can do wide-spread damage.

That one in Russia was minor, and only caused damage because it was near population. If that one came down 200 years ago (which is still extremely recently when talking about these things), people may have never even noticed -- except maybe some would have seen it streaking through the sky and heard a "Boom".

edit on 4/13/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 01:07 PM
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um doesn't this article basically translate to "We aren't really looking for dangerous asterioids"?



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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So let me get this straight, the government subsidizes farms for billions to grow corn we don't need to artificially lower corn and high fruitous corn syrup...

But finding civilization ending asteroids well that's a job for the free market...

Most ass backward thing I have ever heard.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 





I'm talking about asteroids/meteoroids/meteorites that can do wide-spread damage.


But you mentioned Tunguska, which was about same type of event.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 





I'm talking about asteroids/meteoroids/meteorites that can do wide-spread damage.


But you mentioned Tunguska, which was about same type of event.


The Tunguska event was much more powerful (at least the effects that reached the ground were much more powerful).



edit on 4/13/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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Originally posted by benrl
So let me get this straight, the government subsidizes farms for billions to grow corn we don't need to artificially lower corn and high fruitous corn syrup...

But finding civilization ending asteroids well that's a job for the free market...

Most ass backward thing I have ever heard.


Governments can subsidize farms efficiently, but the private sector can more efficiently hunt for asteroids.

We don't need an over-arching level of bureaucracy overseeing (and wasting bureaucratic funds) on this. The money will still be there, but it won't go through NASA first.

I'm not sure why people think NASA needs to be overseeing this when most of the work is already being done by non-NASA telescopes.





edit on 4/13/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 03:02 PM
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that's good to know. i feel better already.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 





I'm talking about asteroids/meteoroids/meteorites that can do wide-spread damage.


But you mentioned Tunguska, which was about same type of event.


The Tunguska event was much more powerful (at least the effects that reached the ground were much more powerful).

Tunguska event created a big wildfire no records of personal damage as I recall. Last one, a lot of people ended at the hospital and some buildings got damaged. Sorry but evidence is debunking your post.


edit on 4/13/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)


jra

posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman
Tunguska event created a big wildfire no records of personal damage as I recall. Last one, a lot of people ended at the hospital and some buildings got damaged. Sorry but evidence is debunking your post.


It did more than create a wildfire. It flattened 2,150 sq km worth of forest. Imagine if that had been a populated area and the destruction that would have caused.

But enough of this silly argument. Soylent's point, which still stands is that impacts are very rare events and we're only finding more asteroids, because more people are looking.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


That makes sense to me, considering that it is VERY rare that a large one hits Earth. I suppose the last one in recorded history was Tunguska. Before that, I don't know what.


Well, that's kind of reassuring. It's like saying an elite rescue team has a mere 1% loss rate for hostages. Why, that's a 99% success rate to be the optimist. Of course, if the optimist was the 1% who got his head blown off to make the exception? I guess it's not so reassuring anymore.

There are a few things in life I don't play statistics on for feeling better in ignorance. The odds against being a personal victim of violent crime for instance. The long odds for there being a connection problem between my truck and trailer when I drove 18 wheelers is another, yet I still checked every time.

Above all that would be the event of a space object hitting Earth with enough force to change or even end large portions of life here. As they say?

......it only has to happen one time.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by jra
 





It did more than create a wildfire. It flattened 2,150 sq km worth of forest.


No firefighters in those days, big wildfire make sense.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Just to add my opinion, I would rather be in my home, unprepared letting this instant death happen rather than waiting anxiously for my doom. What they need to do and probably have done is create weapons to destroy these asteroids before they come into earths atmosphere. I am pretty darn sure that there are unreported heroes who have saved the earth, that the world may never know.





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