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Treason Alert: Dems Try to Move Gun Bill Forward Without Allowing Senators to Read It

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posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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Treason Alert: Dems Try to Move Gun Bill Forward Without Allowing Senators to Read It


www.infowars.com

Like the disastrous and unconstitutional Obamacare bill rammed down the throats of the American people, the unconstitutional S. 49 gun bill aimed at the heart of the Second Amendment passed cloture earlier today in the Senate with 68 votes despite the fact senators have not had a chance to read it.

Cloture will now put the legislation up for a simple majority vote. Democrats have a majority in the Senate. It will be up to Republicans in the House to derail the bill if it is passed in the Senate.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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Here we go again, they can't read the bill until they pass it.



Note that not only did the Republicans refuse to filibuster this legislation, but 16 actually voted for it.

This is all out treason. Not only is this legislation unconstitutional, but the very idea that we as a nation are allowing bills to be passed into law without even reading them is... unreal to say the least.



Look at the smug smirk... it makes me want to puke. And of course, complete media blackout.

www.infowars.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 12-4-2013 by Bioshock because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by Bioshock
 


If theres one senator I cant stand its Fienstien, having lived in her district most of my life all I have seen from her is detestable un-american legislation geared toward creating a nanny state where our rights are surrendered for "protection"
edit on 12-4-2013 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by Bioshock
 


Please don't have a heart attack. It will never pass the House of Representatives.

BTW, it's hard to read and understand all of that Legalese Gobbly Goop anyway.

Hire a good lawyer to read it fast.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:03 PM
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Obviously, this has zero chance in the House. Thankfully.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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Anyone want to take a $20 bet that they aren't nearly as understanding on these highly partisan bills when they are next out of power to see the right doing this? They may work together and be flip sides of the same coin on 90% of matters...but each side does have their mutually exclusive pet interests and personal crusades. It's getting uglier and uglier for how those are carried out over the top of the other side.

The only one to lose is all of us out here. They still go have drinks around Washington Cocktail circuits after the business day. We get to eat cake.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


So you're saying that our congressmen, who's job it is to read and introduce "legalese gobbly goop" should get a pass on this because it's difficult to understand?

If a congressmen needs a lawyer to decode their own work, they shouldn't be a congressmen.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:13 PM
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It's my understanding that they voted to vote for it, instead of the filibuster that the Republicans were threatening. That doesn't mean it's been passed into law- so no, it's not treason.
edit on 12-4-2013 by RegisteredUser because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by ZombieJesus
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


So you're saying that our congressmen, who's job it is to read and introduce "legalese gobbly goop" should get a pass on this because it's difficult to understand?

If a congressmen needs a lawyer to decode their own work, they shouldn't be a congressmen.


Well actually thats probably the biggest problem, most of these people ARE lawyers, are come from that field.

Heres a list, with this many people trained in double speak running the country is it any wonder these laws are so convoluted.


Lamar Alexander: Republican: New York University Max Baucus: Democrat:Stanford University Evan Bayh: Democrat: University of Virginia Michael Bennet: Democrat: Yale Jeff Bingaman: Democrat: Stanford University Kit Bond: Republican: University of Virginia Sam Brownbach: Republican: University of Kansas Roland Burris: Democrat: Howard University Robert Byrd: Democrat: American University Law School Ben Cardin: Democrat: University of Maryland Ben Casey: Democrat: Catholic University Saxby Chambliss: Republican: University of Tennessee Thad Cochran: Republican: University of Mississippi John Cornyn: Republican: University of Virginia Michael Crapo: Republican: Harvard Chris Dodd: Democrat: University of Louisville Dick Durbin: Democrat: Georgetown Russ Feingold: Democrat: Harvard Kirsten Gillibrand: Democrat: University of California, Los Angeles Lindsey Graham: Republican: University of South Carolina Judd Gregg: Republican: Boston University Tom Harkin: Democrat: Catholic University Orrin Hatch: Republican: University of Pittsburgh Kay Bailey Hutchinson: Republican: University of Texas Ken Inouye: Democrat: George Washington University Mike Johanns: Republican: Creighton University Tom Johnson: Democrat: University of South Dakota Paul Kirk: Democrat: Harvard Amy Klobucher: Democrat: University of Chicago John Kyl: Republican: University of Arizona Pat Leahy: Democrat: Georgetown George Lemieux: Republican: Georgetown Carl Levin: Democrat: Harvard Joe Lieberman: Independent: Yale Mel Martinez: Republican: Florida State University Claire McCaskill: Democrat: University of Missouri Mitch McConnell: Republican: University of Kentucky Robert Menendez: Democrat: Rutgers University Lisa Murkowski: Republican: Williamette College Ben Nelson: Democrat: University of Nebraska Bill Nelson: Democrat: University of Virginia Mark Pryor: Democrat: University of Arkansas Jack Reed: Democrat: Harvard Harry Reid: Democrat: Georgetown James Risch: Republican: University of Idaho Chuck Schumer: Democrat: Harvard Jeff Sessions: Republican: University of Alabama Richard Shelby: Republican: University of Alabama Arlen Specter: Democrat: Yale Tom Udall: Democrat: University of New Mexico David Vitter: Republican: Tulane George Voinovitch: Republican: Ohio State Mark Warner: Democrat: Harvard Jim Webb: Democrat: Georgetown Sheldon Whitehouse: Democrat: University of Virginia Roger Wicker: Republican: University of Mississippi Ron Wyden: Democrat: University of Oregon



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:16 PM
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It's amazing how brazen those in our government have become in showing us people that what we want will never matter.

Maybe next time an election comes up for a Rep, NOBODY should vote. What are they going to do then?

Oh that's right, dead people can vote. Forgot about that.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by RegisteredUser
It's my understanding that they voted to vote for it, instead of the filibuster that the Republicans were threatening. That doesn't mean it's been passed into law- so no, it's not treason.
edit on 12-4-2013 by RegisteredUser because: (no reason given)


You understood it correctly then.

I have to laugh at how hard Alex Jones and his fear team try to spin every possible quote to fit their fear agenda. If one can't see the difference between facts and lies, they have no business posting another source's news articles on the internet.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by Bioshock

Treason Alert: Dems Try to Move Gun Bill Forward Without Allowing Senators to Read It





How exactly is all of this (treason)? Please explain...I really do want to understand.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

The Sleep Of Treason

The misuse of the term "treason" is something that was so troubling to the founders of the United States that they took care to explicitly define it.


Article III., Section. 3.

"Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court." -- Constitution for the United States of America

But hey, that's just the Constitution -- one of the most misquoted, misunderstood and misrepresented documents in human history.

Who cares what it actually says? Not enough, apparently.

It would be refreshing and unusual if more people who presume themselves absolute authorities on what constitutes "treason" or what is or isn't "constitutional" would respect the document enough to actually read and comprehend the contents of the Constitution itself.

I won't hold my breath.



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 



Treason
The crime of betraying one's country, esp. by attempting to kill the sovereign or overthrow the government.
The action of betraying someone or something


I believe that even the act of voting for something that is unconstitutional, like gun control, is betraying the United States and her people. The constitution is the law of the land, it trumps both Federal and State law. The term "shall not be infringed" is very clear.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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Even if this were a vote to pass the gun bill into law, there are only 53 Dems and 2 Independents in the Senate. They couldn't have gotten the 68 votes they got, without at the very least 13 Republican votes. Not only that but, they don't have to read these bills to vote. Any senator can vote without reading.
edit on 12-4-2013 by RegisteredUser because: grammer and punctuation
edit on 12-4-2013 by RegisteredUser because: grammer, punctuation, and bad math



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by Majic
 


"shall consist only in levying War against them"

Interesting then that DHS has done nothing but purchase endless amounts of ammunition all while these bills continue to circulate to strip Americans of their guns. I'm not saying it's a declaration of war, but something sure as hell doesn't add up huh?



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by Majic
 


Thanks for that clarification. All too often we are too quick to throw words out into the mix without the proper usage....which only serves to breed more disinformation.

Also, not having adequate time to read bills has become the norm from both sides of the aisle, has it not?



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by ZombieJesus
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


So you're saying that our congressmen, who's job it is to read and introduce "legalese gobbly goop" should get a pass on this because it's difficult to understand?

If a congressmen needs a lawyer to decode their own work, they shouldn't be a congressmen.


Tactic #2

Whenever an important bill is created ALWAYS make sure it is over 1,000 pages long.

That way nobody will read it.


Nancy Pelosi: Lets pass ObamaCare so we can find out what's inside it!



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Rubber Stamp Act


Originally posted by sheepslayer247

Also, not having adequate time to read bills has become the norm from both sides of the aisle, has it not?

Indeed, and as distasteful as it may be, there's absolutely nothing "unconstitutional" about it. Representatives and Senators can vote however they want for whatever reasons they want, or no reasons at all.

Heck, a Senator could stand up and say "I have no idea what I'm voting for, but here's my vote" or even "I'm voting for this because I despise the Constitution, hate this country and want everyone in it to die a horrible death." Not exactly compelling slogans for re-election campaigns, and possibly grounds for censure or recall, but not prohibited by the Constitution.

Freedom is very much a double-edged sword. As the history of this country so amply testifies, many, many things Congress has passed into law have been later found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, and some of the greatest Presidents in U.S. history have also been some of the worst violators of the Constitution.

The nature and composition of the government specified by the Constitution are pointedly designed to account for the many ways government power can shift, corrupt and be abused. Over the years, exactly that has occurred in great abundance, and the latest trend -- a slow, steady march toward consolidation of all power in a single, monolithic federal juggernaut -- is offensive to the original and far more robust concept of distributed powers (and very troubling, in my opinion).

Despite all the absurd shenanigans we the people have witnessed over the past couple of centuries (from the very beginning, I might add), the government we have does ultimately represent us -- from our greatest strengths right down to our most embarrassing weaknesses. And even as screwed up as things already are (and they will get worse), they can get better if we as a nation wish it to be so.

In order for that to happen, there must be some sort of common ground, and the Constitution is about as good as it's going to get for us Americans.

Thus I hope I can be forgiven for being a bit parochial about the definitions and meanings associated with the Constitution, and impatient with their misrepresentation.

I wouldn't care if it didn't matter, and I challenge anyone and everyone who truly loves and respects the Constitution to love and respect it enough to care about it, too.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by Majic
 



Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort.


Considering the US federal Government has been elected to represent the people in absentia they have repeatedly waged war against us the people in a manner of issues/rights where the US federal government was limited in power, they have repeatedly abused that power, not for the will of the people, but for their own political agendas.

When this country was founded it was founded with the severe distrust of government which is the greatest enemy to the people when a government is for of and by itself, and does not represent the people,it is treason.
edit on 12-4-2013 by neo96 because: (no reason given)






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