Ancient megalithic cairn discovered on bottom of the Sea of Galilee

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posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by MysteriousHusky
 


I'd find it far more likely that the Earth is inhaling and exhaling to cause land masses to rise and fall, than that human's could build enough structures to sink them.




posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 10:22 AM
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Honestly, things like this get me to wondering...

Instead of sending divers down to a sunken site, I wonder why has no corporation stepped up and funded a different kind of exploration.


Would it not be possible to sink some kind of dome over an entire site (provided the site isn't too large, and too deep)? At that point the remaining water could be pumped out, and the team could dive down, enter the dome, and walk around/dig. Extra air tanks could be brought down depending on length of time required. It'd sure make exploring them easier, IMO.



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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Interesting. My tinfoil hat is buzzing, and tells me this could have been an attempt to bury 'something' that was never to see the light of day again, given the size of the cairn. If you were an ancient community living off the land/ hunting, and you came across a Roswell-style UFO crashed into the ground, perhaps with 'demon-like' dead alien beings, or giving off strange lights & sounds - mightn't your chief ordain that the monstrosity be buried so completely that it could never be revealed ever again? I'd love to see if they have any radar penetration of the interior. If that's a bit outlandish, perhaps an habitation that was considered accursed/ haunted..?

More likely, it could have been an early attempt at island building. If they had free-divers that could reach the bottom, maybe they realised it was shallow enough to start building an island. For what purpose, it can only be guessed at I suppose, but it might have been a self-laudatory attempt to raise a 'status symbol' for one of the local chieftains, or a practical facility such as a fishing depot/ storage point.

Also likely, considering the area, it could have been a primitive altar, albeit of giant size. In the OT, the altars of YHWH were always to be made of unhewn rocks - that was a specific stipulation of the ritual practice of the patriarchs. Jericho was inhabited very early on, can't remember exactly how far back, but the figure of 8000 years ago rings a bell (Jericho's like a city-sized 'oopart', too old to fit the paradigm) - so other primitive societies could well have been extant in the area. Some of the oldest cohabitations of neanderthal & cro-magnon are in Israel, the area is rich in anthropological gemstones.

Does anyone else remember the folktale where a king asks his people to build him a tower that reaches to the moon, so he can pop up and have a look? Could this cairn represent an attempt to reach up to something that once hovered over that location?



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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That makes good sense to me



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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Maybe a salvage company will get permission to have a barge mounted crane remove the stones one at a time. It would be costly and time consuming, but I can't think of any other way of finding out what's under those rocks, if anything.



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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Could this be the secondary site for the Fresh Kills landfill, put part of the rubble in USA, and other part in Israel.



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


This is a very interesting post. Thank you for sharing it.

It would be enlightening if divers would go down and poke around to see if this is truly just a pile of dumped rocks from ships or from nearby ancient construction projects or if it has some specific purpose.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


It's just a rock, move along nothing to see here



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 01:56 AM
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Here's a theory. When Jesus was walking across the water of the Sea of Galilee, he was actually walking on this cairn.

After feeding the thousands along the shore of Galilee, Jesus sent the disciples to "the other side" to either Bethsaida or Capernaum, both of which are on the north end of the Sea. After Jesus had sent them away to meet up with them later, he departed to a mountain to pray. When the disciples rowed the boat to about the middle of the sea, the winds blew against them and Jesus watched them rowing against the wind from the mountain side.

I think it is possible that they were on the southwest shore about a mile or so north from the southern end. Jesus headed west into the mountains that are along the southwestern shore and the disciples went east away from the shore. A couple of miles out would put them in about the middle of the Sea at the southern end. The winds pushed them south and west back toward Jesus, who then hops on one of the many boats left from the earlier gathering and tries to catch up only to run a ground on the cairn. Seeing the disciples a short distance away, Jesus walks the shallows toward them and climbs aboard. Shortly there after the storm clams down they head north again landing at Gennesaret on the northwestern shore of the lake, half way between Capernaum and Magdala.





 
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