I photographed fire in the sky

page: 4
35
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:29 PM
link   
reply to post by CottonwoodStormy
 

This is one of the few occasions where I think the word "awesome" is truly appropriate.
Etna is awesome. We just hope she doesn't do anything too nasty!

For some very informative and easy to follow information on Etna (and many other volcanoes) I can recommend the website run by John Seach, a volcanologist. Here's his page for Etna: Volcano live -- Etna. John Seach (not "Search", but Seach) gives the factual information without any hype. He tells it like it is and he keeps his site pretty well up to date.

The latest stuff is usually on the News page on his site and then he transfers it across to the relevant volcano page a bit later. (His News page has a report about Etna from last week.)

Etna sometimes erupts from more than one crater at a time. These sites can sometimes be some distance apart -- which might help to explain why you sometimes saw two "pillars of fire".


By the way for a great little easy-to-follow summary of how to upload pics, go to THIS POST by Whateva69 in the above thread. (It's on page 8, so I figured I'd save you some work.
)

If you get stuck or need any help, please feel free to send me a U2U at any time.


~Mike
edit on 10/4/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:29 PM
link   
reply to post by JustMike
 


I have observed the pulsating orange sky for the last month, I did on one night see a few white orbs dash for a moment in the pulsating sky but it could have been ball lightening or light sources of some sort (that's also part of why I have been watching this area of the sky), it has been only the last 2 nights, the 8th and 9th of April that I observed the 2 vertical smoke like flaming columns in the sky between the clouds, one shorter then the other but identical movement. That would make sense they came from the same source, like 2 hotspots very close to each other or something being reflected in light and clouds. Tonight now there is nothing but clear night sky, no orange hue, no nothing but again atmospheric variables may account for that. I feel pretty resolved its mount Etna, at least unless I actually see an object and if so you will all be the first to know!!!



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by CottonwoodStormy
 

You know, I think it could be Etna! Take a look at this:


And even though It's a long way off, that's a pretty big volcano and on a clear night, the light of the eruptions' flames could be seen from a long way away.


Sorry, but the distance between Collo and Mt. Etna is more than 750km!!! Over such a great distance you can't even see Mt Etna if our planet would be flat. Imagine that the surface of our planet is curved. The height difference over a distance at about 350km will be nearly 9km. Mt. Etna is more than double away.
edit on 10.4.2013 by Spartanian because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:36 PM
link   
reply to post by JustMike
 


Yah I am truly stunned in amazement! Thank you for the links its getting late here I will definitely check John Seach out and the link for photos tomorrow, I would like to be a little more in tune with ATS, I love this site especially when I am so remote, you guys keep me in touch with the thinkers in this world. Thanks for your friendship and I will see you all in other posts!!!



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Spartanian
 

Very true. If we used the formula for calculating the theoretical horizon and did not take atmospherics into account, then we'd find Etna would be out of sight. But as I mentioned in my post on the previous page, the conditions right now are ideal for atmospheric refraction, especially as Sicily (and Etna) are over the cool waters of the Mediterranean Sea from where the OP lives in the coastal region of Algeria.

In another couple of months those conditions will not exist, but right now, in spring, is the ideal time.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by CottonwoodStormy
reply to post by JustMike
 


Yah I am truly stunned in amazement! Thank you for the links its getting late here I will definitely check John Seach out and the link for photos tomorrow, I would like to be a little more in tune with ATS, I love this site especially when I am so remote, you guys keep me in touch with the thinkers in this world. Thanks for your friendship and I will see you all in other posts!!!


Thanks OP, please keep us up-to-date since as the above poster pointed out, due to the curvature of the earth this could not be Mt. Etna, to me it did not look like that anyway, a volcano has a funnel shaped dischared as obviously seen in the volcano pics in the thread, and does not look like a straight tube going up for thousands of feet. Try to get more pics or videos, any neighbours or locals around with which you could compare notes?



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:53 PM
link   
Great work Mike, but I still have some problems with the "Etna theory".

To add to what I said at the end of this post, I would like to point out that, if there was indeed eruption since the afternoon of the 8 April, that was only Vulcanian explosion:


Etna has been full of surprises in 2013. Beyond the multitude of lava fountaining events the volcano has produced over the last few months, the Italian volcano surprised everyone by having a truly explosive (vulcanian) eruptions since yesterday (April 8).

The eruption produced a dark grey plume but little to nothing in the way of lava fountains and flows. This is typical for vulcanian eruptions, where volcanic material is fragmented into ash, lapilli and bombs (the catch-all term is “tephra”), but dominated by fine ash. The explosions from these eruptions can be discrete “booms” that sound like canon fire.

This video (below) of the vulcanian explosions at Etna show the “shot” from the new Southeast Crater. These eruptions are typically caused by material clogging the throat of the volcano until pressure builds to sufficient levels to force the blockage out as an explosive.

Strombolian eruptions, which is what we more typically see at Etna, are formed by rapid exsolution of large bubbles in magma within the conduit of the volcano, so that is why they are accompanied by lava fountains and flows, unlike the vulcanian explosion like today’s events.


Source

The videos:





So there was no incandescent material that was threw outside the volcano.

I'm also rather skeptical about any supposed eruption that is able to impress the CCD sensor of a camera as low as 100 ISO and at a so quick exposure time of 1/40s! It's not like if we were talking about shooting a streetlight next to the camera!

To me, it looks like rather some closer phenomenon that still need to be determined.

BTW, Tamara, do you think that it could be possible for you to give us the exact azimuth of the object position? I mean, not just "East", but rather more precise orientation, with a compass and in degrees, for example, with the plain North set at 0°:


edit on 10-4-2013 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by Spartanian
 

But as I mentioned in my post on the previous page, the conditions right now are ideal for atmospheric refraction, especially as Sicily (and Etna) are over the cool waters of the Mediterranean Sea from where the OP lives in the coastal region of Algeria.


Sounds like a good theory. But if atmospheric refraction is really involved then wouldn't we expect the "fire" near the horizon instead mid-air? Second, on the enhanced photo the beam is a very straight line and I would be expect a distorted image. The beam had to look like a "snake"



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:57 PM
link   
cool....no one has posted about the prophecy..."he'll call down fire from the sky in front of all."....some say it may be by hologram.....the bible says it will be by sorcery...
but the direction is confirmed 82 degrees on the compass rose. when we see the airliner lights descending and aimed right at us....they are 110 miles out..at 30,000 feet..



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by Spartanian

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by CottonwoodStormy
 

You know, I think it could be Etna! Take a look at this:


And even though It's a long way off, that's a pretty big volcano and on a clear night, the light of the eruptions' flames could be seen from a long way away.


Sorry, but the distance between Collo and Mt. Etna is more than 750km!!! Over such a great distance you can't even see Mt Etna if our planet would be flat. Imagine that the surface of our planet is curved. The height difference over a distance at about 350km will be nearly 9km. Mt. Etna is more than double away.
edit on 10.4.2013 by Spartanian because: (no reason given)




www.timeanddate.com...

Distance from Palermo to Algiers

Distance is 925 kilometers or 575 miles or 499 nautical miles
The distance is the theoretical air distance (great circle distance). Flying between the two locations' airports can be a different distance, depending on airport location and actual route chosen.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:26 PM
link   
Nothing weird about this.

If you shine a bright flashlight straight up through smoke rising high you will get the same effect.
Only this is orange because of massive flame and a few billion times bigger, brighter and reaching way higher
than a flashlight.. through ash and smoke all lit up


Just look at it really. It is Etna



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:48 PM
link   
reply to post by elevenaugust
 

Please forgive me for being so slow to reply. It's late here and I'm beat, so I'm doing the best I can.


Anyway, maybe due to tiredness I'm not quite sure if I follow you. You said

So there was no incandescent material that was threw outside the volcano.


The report you quoted said there was little to nothing by way of lava fountains and flows. It didn't say that no incandescent material was ejected. It said the eruption was Vulcanian.

Vulcanian eruptions are typically more explosive than Strombolian eruptions. They can throw material kilometres into the air. (True Strombolian eruptions usually send the material to a lower altitude, say tens to hundreds of metres.) However, even when a Vulcanian eruption does not produce much by way of lava fountains and flows it is still quite violent and can produce amounts of incandescent material that may be visible (especially at night) from a long way off.

Here is a wonderful image of Anak Krakatau during a Vulcanian eruption, taken by Tom Pfeiffer:

The image source is volcano discovery (dot) com, where they specifically identify this as Vulcanian.

No major lava flows in that eruption, but still very spectacular!

There is also the issue of exactly when the OP's image was taken. Could you please check the exif data? I expect the time and date should be there.

The reason it's important is because Vulcanian eruptions often are rather short-lived and the volcano can then move on to a more Strombolian eruptive state. According to the Etna Current Activity page at Volcano Discovery, comments with tonight's webcam pics state that Etna is right now showing Strombolian activity. So I'd like to know if that pic was taken when it was in its Vulcanian state or perhaps when it was transitioning to Strombolian.

Re picking up the image with those camera settings. The ones I posted were enhanced to bring out the "column of fire" as best as possible with the data available in the original image. It's not as if the original showed it that well. However, as the light from these eruptions can be incredibly intense due to the white heat of the molten material within the erupting crater, it's feasible that some of it could be carried a great distance under optimum conditions.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 06:13 PM
link   
reply to post by Spartanian
 

Again, good points. And again, my apologies for being so tardy with my reply. I'm as interested as all of you and if we can knock down a theory then well and good.

Re the fire being in the air rather than near the horizon. If the original fire source was near sea level, then yes, we'd likely have to argue that what would be seen from distance should be also (usually). But in this case, if we allow Etna for argument, the volcano is almost 11,000 feet high and any fire rising from its upper crater would add a bit to that as well. So, it makes some modicum of sense that it would appear to be in mid-air.

Re the fairly vertical "beam" (or pillar). Again, if we assume Etna for the argument, it would have depended on the prevailing wind conditions around Etna at the time the image was taken. In still air, smoke from a very hot source does tend to go straight up for some distance. And again, the fact that this volcano is more than two miles high has to be taken into account. And sea breezes down near the ground level on Sicily woun't make a lot of difference atop this volcano.

This is a very large volcano, the biggest in the entire region. I don't know if anyone has calculated how many watts of heat it puts out when it's erupting but it must be colossal. The volcano's very stratovolcano (classic cone) shape could even help to drag cooler air in from lower down and create something of a "funnelling" effect. But as the enhanced images I posted show, the smoke plume begins to break up as it rises and even on the way up there is the sort of randomness within the plume that indicates it's natural and not just a beam of light.

My own feelings? I'm not 100% convinced it's Etna but I'm about 99%, because:
-- it's in the right direction according to what the OP said (basically east from her);
-- the atmospheric conditions for refraction are most ideal over cooler bodies of water in spring, and can extend the range at which objects can be viewed by 100s of km -- and we have the cooled-down Mediterranean Sea between the OP and Sicily and it's early spring;
-- very bright light sources are more easily viewed from a distance than things which are not so bright;
-- the biggest and highest volcano in the whole region is erupting and sometimes producing very intense light sources;
-- it has recently had eruptions from more than one crater at a time -- and the OP reported sometimes seeing two "columns of fire".

I just apply Occam's Razor and as no-one has suggested anything else that would explain what was seen and captured on camera (as it's not just a man-made beam of light), I go with what is physically possible, even if very unusual.

Anyway as it's after 1 am I'll leave you all to it. If you figure a better answer, no worries from me. I have no dog in this race, after all. I wasn't even the first to suggest Etna. I just think it fits. That's all.


edit on 10/4/13 by JustMike because: I forget but it must've been important, I guess.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 07:02 PM
link   
It called a very big shooting star. Rare sight to see.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 07:10 PM
link   
Yes... its a fire door...???? !!!!




posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 07:46 PM
link   
Awesome! Keep your camera handy and keep us updated if you see more




posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 02:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by JustMikePlease forgive me for being so slow to reply. It's late here and I'm beat, so I'm doing the best I can.

No problem mate, it was late here as well!



Originally posted by JustMikeAnyway, maybe due to tiredness I'm not quite sure if I follow you. You said

So there was no incandescent material that was threw outside the volcano.


The report you quoted said there was little to nothing by way of lava fountains and flows. It didn't say that no incandescent material was ejected. It said the eruption was Vulcanian.

Vulcanian eruptions are typically more explosive than Strombolian eruptions. They can throw material kilometres into the air. (True Strombolian eruptions usually send the material to a lower altitude, say tens to hundreds of metres.) However, even when a Vulcanian eruption does not produce much by way of lava fountains and flows it is still quite violent and can produce amounts of incandescent material that may be visible (especially at night) from a long way off.

Here is a wonderful image of Anak Krakatau during a Vulcanian eruption, taken by Tom Pfeiffer:

The image source is volcano discovery (dot) com, where they specifically identify this as Vulcanian.

No major lava flows in that eruption, but still very spectacular!

That's sure, but a Vulcanian eruption doesn't mean necessarily lots of incandescent materials, lava fountains and flow, like one can see it in you example above.
At the contrary, if you look at the two videos taken the exact same day as the OP photo and that I've posted in my previous post, it's clear that this Vulcanian eruption was only made of fragmented material such as ash, lapilli and bombs, but dominated by fine ash.

Anyway, I was wrong since it seems that some incandescent bombs were effectively threw out of one of the cone:


Five days after the latest episode of lava fountaining (paroxysm) at Etna's New Southeast Crater, the volcano started showing signs of renewed unrest. On the afternoon of 8 April 2013, the same New Southeast Crater started producing powerful, though rather isolated explosions, which continued at varying intervals - normally from 30 minutes up to 2 hours - through the night. Some of these explosions were quite violent, throwing incandescent bombs beyond the old cone of the Southeast Crater nearby, and producing puffs of ash a few hundred meters high.


Source

Some great photos were taken by Flickr's user "etnaboris" as well, like this one for example, taken at 4:00GMT the 10 April (yesterday) with the following comments:


Etna has continued producing small to medium sized explosions, some Strombolian, some Vulcanian (like Strombolian, these are discrete, isolated bursts but with a lot more ash)


So I was wondering if just "some" (small?) incandescent bombs would be able to produce a beam of light visible up to 750km?! I would tend to agree anyway that it could be the Etna that produced this light if we were talking of large amount of lava flows, (especially with camera settings as poor as 100 ISO and 1/40s exposure time) but, as it can be seen in the videos, that wasn't the case.


Originally posted by JustMikeThere is also the issue of exactly when the OP's image was taken. Could you please check the exif data? I expect the time and date should be there.

Of course, here are the full EXIF data for the OP's image:




posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 04:23 AM
link   
reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Good morning all, well Tonio to answer your question about more precise directions via a compass, if I'm center and look NE around the 45 degree or 50 degree mark that would be where I am seeing the lights and pulsating sky which according to the map posted is the direction where Mount Etna is. it is hard to believe that is what I'm seeing since as people have noted its very far away, but I have no other explanation for what could produce this. Literally at the bottom of the mountain I live on is Collo (maybe a few thousand people), which would be on a compass north and down from me directly on the sea. This is a small town, and underdeveloped, they don't have any technology here, in fact my internet comes from Collo and it is regularly down for a month cause everything is underground and gets cut regularly by tractors driving over the cables, or rain, lol. The power is on and off here everytime the wind blows hard so you can understand why I say there are no laser lights or even infrastructure around. NE of Collo is a winding road around the mountains along the coast of the sea, with cement brick houses along the way to Skikda which is mainly a port for goods an hour and a half away driving. Even the military installations are made of rock, cement and sandbags out here, that's it. Very primitive, no such thing as even cutting grass here unless it's done by hand. One other poster mentioned asking my neighbours, I have done that before but they refuse to look, and will think I am crazy if I say anything more, its like the sky is a taboo subject or something here (perhaps that's why there are lower reports of ufos and things in this area cause people keep quiet and private about what they see. There was no activity last night, but as I say I have witnessed the pulsing sky for a month give or take a day or two then it starts again so I will keep watching and hope for better pics. Thank you again to everyone. Tamara



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 04:30 AM
link   
reply to post by CottonwoodStormy
 


PS. My husband is Algerian, he has seen the sky pulsing and the vertical lines of fire smoke as he calls it cause I made him look, I asked him what he thought it was and he didn't know he just chalked it up to a phenomena, and when I described it to his mom, she reckons it's God showing me fire (deeply innocently faithful here)!



posted on Apr, 11 2013 @ 04:49 AM
link   
That image just looks like you have zoomed all the way in on a blade of grass in the dark.




new topics
top topics
 
35
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join