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Internet from LED bulbs- Researchers create 3Gbps LiFi network with LED bulbs

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posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 09:59 AM
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www.extremetech.com...


Researchers at the Fraunhofer Henrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Germany have successfully transmitted data at 3Gbps using conventional LED bulbs in a laboratory setting. In a real-world setting (at a trade fair), the same system was capable of 500Mbps.

Visible light communication has a slew of advantages. In essence, LiFi can turn any LED lamp into a network connection. LiFi, by virtue of operating at such high frequencies (hundreds of terahertz), is well beyond the sticky tentacles of the wireless spectrum crunch and regulatory licensing. For the same reason, LiFi can be used in areas where there’s extensive RF noise (conventions, trade fairs), or where RF noise is generally prohibited (hospitals, airplanes). The Fraunhofer researchers even claim that VLC improves privacy, because your signal can be easily obscured from prying eyes with opaque materials — but as you can imagine, that’s also a tick in the “con” column as well.

With so many possible uses, from street lamp-to-car communications through to ultra-fast short-range communications, and the growing maturity of LED lighting, it’s really just a matter of time until LiFi becomes a reality.


Another article from February on LiFi:

Micro-LED LiFi: Where every light source in the world is also TV, and provides gigabit internet access:

www.extremetech.com...


LiFi, as you may have guessed, stands for Light-Fidelity — as in, Wireless-Fidelity (WiFi), but using visible light instead of gigahertz radio waves. How LiFi works is very simple: You have an a light on one end (an LED in this case), and a photodetector (light sensor) on the other. If the LED is on, the photodetector registers a binary one; otherwise it’s a binary zero. Flash the LED enough times and you build up a message. Use an array of LEDs, and perhaps a few different colors, and very soon you are dealing with data rates in the range of hundreds or megabits per second.


So the next generation internet might be coming from LED bulbs
edit on 9-4-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by Cabin
 


I dunno. Doesn't seem like a good replacement to WIFI. From the article it seems like it can't even pass through walls. Privacy is nice but i prefer convenience



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by JDmOKI
 


It is likely you have a light source in every room


To be honest, I do not know all the details about this technology, how it exactly works, although seemed like a cool thing so decided to share



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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LiFi is like inferred. I use my phone to control my mythtv(media box) which is using WiFi I can be out of the room and still change or pause channels. Inferred can't do that.

So not very impressive. inless they come up with something its going to be good at.



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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so why cant we use the sun to make like a super internet network?



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:19 AM
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Nice.

Now they can spy on us through LED AND CF bulbs.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by dc4lifeskater
 


Think logically...

You can not manipulate the sun, although it is possible to manipulate the LEDs. As it explained in the OP. For example on is 1, off is 0. Do it 1000 times in a second, you already have information containing 1000 zeros and ones. This technology uses different small amplitudes and human eye is not even able to notice them, although the light sensor can notice them and turn them into information and the computer or whatever screen will display the information. I tried to give as simple explanation as possible, so it is not technically very accurate, but it should be understandable that sun cannot be manipulated like that to send information.



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by dc4lifeskater
so why cant we use the sun to make like a super internet network?

Because we can't make the sun blink at any frequency we want.



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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What I don't understand is why people are coming in here saying that this wouldn't work for wifi, first of all, wifi works from the router that the internet is going to, so yes it would work. I am speechless at how people think wifi just comes out of thin air...
edit on 4/9/2013 by neobludragon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder

Originally posted by dc4lifeskater
so why cant we use the sun to make like a super internet network?

Because we can't make the sun blink at any frequency we want.


Are you sure about that?
couldn't we like put something around the planet that controls the amount of sunlight and how it comes down to earth



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by JDmOKI
reply to post by Cabin
 


I dunno. Doesn't seem like a good replacement to WIFI. From the article it seems like it can't even pass through walls. Privacy is nice but i prefer convenience


From the article?

You know how light works, no?

Lol

It won't replace wifi or internet cables. But it will have a use in areas of low visible obstruction and where there already exists a need or use of, networking.

It's basically a remote control whizzer on speed. I know I change channels on the tv pretty quick, but not 3Gbps.

This is actually a pretty old thing.. there are instructables about the same thing, one I saw used a laser pointer and actually sent stereo music over the air from one pc to another.

More for the hell of it than because it's efficient... but instructables are fun all the time anyway.

edit on 9-4-2013 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by amraks
LiFi is like inferred. I use my phone to control my mythtv(media box) which is using WiFi I can be out of the room and still change or pause channels. Inferred can't do that.

So not very impressive. inless they come up with something its going to be good at.


LiFi is a way to use light. InfraRed is a form of light.

you can use any led as long as there is line of sight.

It's not supposed to replace your phone pretending to be a remote. Why would you need a remote that can transfer 3Gbps anyway? Do you not see the applications of this?

It's more or less a free form of optic fibre.



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by Cabin
 


Explanation: S&F!
Light-emitting diode [wiki]

Light-emitting diode: Colors and materials [wiki]

The trick would be matching the LED specs ...



... with the ...

Photodiode [wiki]

Photodiode: Features [wiki]



... Photodiodes responsiveness etc. and some how electronically select for the specific V/A outputl evel that corresponds to the signal emitting LED.


Features: Response of a silicon photo diode vs wavelength of the incident lightCritical performance parameters of a photodiode include:

Responsivity: The ratio of generated photocurrent to incident light power, typically expressed in A/W when used in photoconductive mode. The responsivity may also be expressed as a Quantum efficiency, or the ratio of the number of photogenerated carriers to incident photons and thus a unitless quantity.

Dark current: The current through the photodiode in the absence of light, when it is operated in photoconductive mode. The dark current includes photocurrent generated by background radiation and the saturation current of the semiconductor junction. Dark current must be accounted for by calibration if a photodiode is used to make an accurate optical power measurement, and it is also a source of noise when a photodiode is used in an optical communication system.

Response time: A photon absorbed by the semiconducting material will generate an electron-hole pair which will in turn start moving in the material under the effect of the electric field and thus generate a current. The finite duration of this current is known as the transit-time spread and can be evaluated by using Ramo's theorem. One can also show with this theorem that the total charge generated in the external circuit is well e and not 2e as might seem by the presence of the two carriers. Indeed the integral of the current due to both electron and hole over time must be equal to e. The resistance and capacitance of the photodiode and the external circuitry give rise to another response time known as RC time constant . This combination of R and C integrates the photoresponse over time and thus lengthens the impulse response of the photodiode. When used in an optical communication system, the response time determines the bandwidth available for signal modulation and thus data transmission.

Noise-equivalent power: (NEP) The minimum input optical power to generate photocurrent, equal to the rms noise current in a 1 hertz bandwidth. NEP is essentially the minimum detectable power. The related characteristic detectivity () is the inverse of NEP, 1/NEP. There is also the specific detectivity () which is the detectivity multiplied by the square root of the area () of the photodetector, () for a 1 Hz bandwidth. The specific detectivity allows different systems to be compared independent of sensor area and system bandwidth; a higher detectivity value indicates a low-noise device or system.[8] Although it is traditional to give () in many catalogues as a measure of the diode's quality, in practice, it is hardly ever the key parameter.
When a photodiode is used in an optical communication system, all these parameters contribute to the sensitivity of the optical receiver, which is the minimum input power required for the receiver to achieve a specified bit error rate.


I wonder about the follow things ...
Photosensitive epilepsy [wiki]

Photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) is a form of epilepsy in which seizures are triggered by visual stimuli that form patterns in time or space, such as flashing lights, bold, regular patterns, or regular moving patterns.


Or a light version of this -
Microwave auditory effect (aka Frey effect) [wiki]

The microwave auditory effect, also known as the microwave hearing effect or the Frey effect, consists of audible clicks (or, with modulation, whole words) induced by pulsed/modulated microwave frequencies. The clicks are generated directly inside the human head without the need of any receiving electronic device. The effect was first reported by persons working in the vicinity of radar transponders during World War II. These induced sounds are not audible to other people nearby. The microwave auditory effect was later discovered to be inducible with shorter-wavelength portions of the electromagnetic spectrum



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Explanation: Oh yes we can!

Butterfly wings show the way by acting like prisms to individually collect, sort, or convert, and select for and emit specific wavelengths from just plain sunlight [or whatever light] that falls upon them.

Butterfly: Technological inspiration [wiki]


Studies on the reflection and scattering of light by the scales on wings of swallowtail butterflies led to the innovation of more efficient light-emitting diodes.

The structural coloration of butterflies is inspiring nanotechnology research to produce paints that do not use toxic pigments and in the development of new display technologies.




Ok so if we can have some huge butterfly wing solar collector using fiber optics to stream the sorted lightwaves out down into a piezo electric motor diven mirror based 'computer' ...

Segmented mirror [wiki]

... or even use complete optial logic circuits based agains on the butterfly wings ability to collect and specifically alter light of a specific input to a specific light wave output.

Of course we can also use a high light frequency tuned ...

Solar cell [wiki]


A solar cell (also called a photovoltaic cell) is an electrical device that converts the energy of light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. It is a form of photoelectric cell (in that its electrical characteristics—e.g. current, voltage, or resistance—vary when light is incident upon it) which, when exposed to light, can generate and support an electric current without being attached to any external voltage source.


... to highly effeciently electrically power electrical based systems and peripherals.

Personal Disclosure: Thats just a basic concept of a solar light based computer and sure it has many flaws the most obvious being it wont work during the nightime or very well when in shadows or its a cloudy day etc.

However it IS DOABLE!


P.S. Could also add small solar thermal unit and derive more electricity and also make hot water and steam say for cups of tea and or coffee!


P.P.S I remember that silver converts UV and Xrays into electricity due to the photoelectric effect and that means the silver mirrors may also be able to select for UV and Xray input whilst still raflecting visual light output.
edit on 9-4-2013 by OmegaLogos because: Edited to add picture of butterfly for best impact effects.



posted on Apr, 13 2013 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by winofiend

Originally posted by amraks
LiFi is like inferred. I use my phone to control my mythtv(media box) which is using WiFi I can be out of the room and still change or pause channels. Inferred can't do that.

So not very impressive. inless they come up with something its going to be good at.


LiFi is a way to use light. InfraRed is a form of light.

you can use any led as long as there is line of sight.

It's not supposed to replace your phone pretending to be a remote. Why would you need a remote that can transfer 3Gbps anyway? Do you not see the applications of this?

It's more or less a free form of optic fibre.


Yes I understand that I was explaining this technology in laymen terms.
explaining the flaws and how its not going to penetrate threw walls. like wifi does.

I could see this being used in a straight cut telecommunication pit tunnel. node to node.
at every corner there could be a node to the exchange.
This would save cable being laid.

The Australian NBN has been under fire lately, this could probably save it.
they wanna use FTTP(fiber to the premises) but the Collation wants it to be FTTN(Fiber to the node)
FTTN wouldn't not make any great improvement like FTTP.
FTTN will still use outdated copper wiring. FTTP will use all Fiber.

FTTN idea would offer a node at the end of every street using existing copper up the street to your premises, which the speeds would be about the same we are achieving currently.

FTTP is completely fiber from exchange to premises, no copper is used, our speeds would improve by 10 fold.

now imagine this instead of them laying cable they could be using LiFi, so fiber down the driveway, down the street to a main node that is using LiFi down the main corridor to exchange, node would be repeater to prevent light/data/power loss.

Now the reason I have said that fiber would be needed to premises, would be the fact that some lines running to homes aren't straight.

So yeah I could see were this technology would be useful. but at the end of the day it would be encrypted so joe blow couldn't open up the pit and capture data packets.





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