Think you're eating Tuna? Think Again.

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posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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Be honest. Call it fish in a can. Put on the side what it might contain. May contain traces of tuna.

If this is what the people get, what do the cats get in their canned food?




posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Sandalphon
If this is what the people get, what do the cats get in their canned food?


It's probably real tuna in cat food. It reminds me of a sad but true quote I read the other day

"We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons."
Alfred Newman



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Sandalphon
Be honest. Call it fish in a can. Put on the side what it might contain. May contain traces of tuna.

If this is what the people get, what do the cats get in their canned food?


Used to eat that stuff all the time because its cheep and easy to make, and ya to true..."May contain traces of tuna" Is right on the money.

And whenever I fed it to my cats the tuna, they would never touch that stuff unless they were really hungry, they would rather prefer the dry foods you get at the stores...Must be because of the addictives they put in there. I think there food may be more nutritious then ours. Its certainly more expensive.


Coincidentally when young me and my friends used to go crawdad hunting, those things can live anywhere, we would get on our bikes ride for a few hours to this creek, then go knee deep in the water and try not to step on any of the buggers while we lifted over rocks and looked in crevices. We even took the little ones we found and put them in a stream in the tiny river that was behind the house complex we used to life in, and then would go there every summer and catch them again as those things spawned pretty fast and it would save us a ride. It was always fun to see the ones who lost there claws, they would have one huge giant claw, and one tiny claw.
edit on 9-4-2013 by galadofwarthethird because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by anton74
Just yesterday I had some Sashimi made from Ahi Tuna(Yellowfin). I don't care if it was my neighbors dog, it was good and I want some more.

People will complain about this, but say nothing when they are buying sweet potatoes instead of Yams.
'

I would imagine it's the discount brand mashed tuna you find in cans... It is a slim chance that premium fish species are being mislabeled at any restaurant that buy is spending the extra money to have specific listings one their menus.

That's my opinion though, I'll fact check to see if reality lines up with my guesstimation.


Seems it even happens in whole fish as well. Some will find its interesting to know however, that bigger corporate players in the game are actually calling for tighter regulation, being that they can afford to handle the fish indentification issues better than some of the smaller players probably.


The findings complement our own: Earlier this week, Oceana found a similar fraud rate in the Boston area, and in a separate Boston study, the Boston Globe found that almost half of tested fish samples were being sold under a false name.

Here’s what Consumer Reports discovered by doing DNA testing on fish samples from restaurants and grocery stores in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut:

Out of 14 sampled fish species, only four were correctly identified every time
18 percent of samples were incorrectly labeled
None of the 22 samples they took of “red snapper” could be positively identified, and half were found to be other species of fish
One “grouper” sample was actually tilefish, which is known to contain levels of mercury that could be dangerous, especially to pregnant women
Coho salmon masqueraded as more expensive king salmon
It’s easy for dishonest businesses to pull off fish fraud. Rules about labeling leave wiggle room, and hardly any seafood is inspected for fraud. Investigations like this one are crucial for raising awareness about the issue and making sure government officials know we care about what’s on our plates. After all, seafood fraud hurts our wallets, our health, and our oceans.

Oceana is calling on the government to stop seafood fraud by enforcing current laws, inspecting more fish, and making sure agencies work together to stop dishonest businesses from ripping consumers off. You can help by telling your Senators to fight seafood fraud!


oceana.org...
edit on 9-4-2013 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 09:50 PM
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I DVR the Dr. OZ shows and will watch two or the episodes in a row. I thought I would catch up on a few shows since I was reaching hard drive capacity. Ironically, one of the Feb episodes I watched last night was entirely devoted to this very topic.

Oceana (the largest international advocacy group for ocean protection) did a recent study and presented their findings throughout the episode. And I must say, things are smelling a bit 'fishy' after learning their findings.

The study showed (via DNA analysis) that Seafood is mislabeled 25 to 70% of the time and swapped with another species that is cheaper, but looks the same; coming from from suplliers, restaurants, grocery stores, and sushi places. Most notable are: Atlantic cod, red snapper and wild salmon.

How Much Seafood Fraud Found In the Following Cities?
+New York 39%
+Los Angeles 55%
+Miami31%
+Boston 48%

Why bad? The cheaper fish can be more harmful to your health due to higher levels of mercury -a concern for children and pregnant woman.

The disguised:
+Tilefish was labeled as red snapper and halibut in NYC
+King mackere as grouper
+White Tuna as Escolar (Escolar is a type of snake mackerel, not even a tuna

Commonly Swaped Species:
+Atlantic cod
+Red snapper
+Wild salmon
+Tuna
+Grouper


Download Full PDF Report




Source



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 09:56 PM
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Originally posted by Plugin
The consumer wan't first seat for cheapest price.

If it was real Tuna, the consumer wouldn't buy it. Too expensive. That said it's a good thing it's not Tuna, that fish specie is endangered.
I Always feel bad when I buy something with Tuna, this new article made me feel a bit better thanks.


You have a good point.

Dolphins have been known to get entangled in Tuna fishing nets



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Because no one sues for false advertisement....... Now you have the power , bring a class action suite against them.. Then you wont have to buy canned tuna you can go buy the whole fish ^^



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 03:17 AM
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Originally posted by Bluesma

Originally posted by OzTiger
Here in Oz we have the Cray Fish (a freshwater relative of the Lobster) which is beautifully tasting and also very expensive.


Crayfish are expensive there??? Whoa, those things taste like the mud they live in and are extremely prolific- why are they expensive?



They don't taste like mud here and they can fetch $50-$80 each (see photo). If you ever come here I can recommend you try the taste.




posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 03:49 AM
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Whatever is in those cans and served up from the grocery store or in the local restaurant ,
just be glad we haven't gotten to the point of "Soylent Green" yet.
Or have we?
edit on 10-4-2013 by azureskys because: spelling



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by Goldcurrent
 


I am in full agreement with your post.
How can you be expected to eat well, if you don't know what you're eating?
You're told not to eat red meat, because it gives you cancer... what if the meat isn't giving you cancer, it's all the # they put in it to make it pinker, to keep it fresher, the hormones, the anti-biotics, the steroids...? There's only so much junk you can put into a body that isn't supposed to be there before the body starts going "WTF" and reacting to it trying to figure out how to regulate itself properly.

Can't buy beef, too expensive, and may contain traces of horse, and all the stuff mentioned above.
Can't buy fish, as when you think you're getting cod, you're getting unspecified white fish meat.
Can't buy crab, as crab meat is often sneakily substituted with a man made pink substance of questionable origin.
Can't buy milk, as it contains hormones, white blood cells, and lactose which most of us can't tolerate, and so probably shouldn't consume...

Tell me what I can eat and drink, which isn't jiggled about, primped, pampered, which is cost effective...
edit on 10-4-2013 by Lulzaroonie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:05 AM
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I was gonna eat tuna earlier in the day and read this thread and my appetite suddenly disappeared



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:13 AM
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reply to post by Lulzaroonie
 


Well, "grow your own" is the only way to go,
if you really want to be sure of what's in there



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:14 AM
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reply to post by azureskys
 


I'm not above it! I've got my own greenhouse and garden. Shame I can't keep my own cow and chickens while I'm at it!



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:15 AM
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I've read this about this long ago. You might want to consider that the retailers may victims--to some extent--as well. Seafood is imported and exported globally and many retailers no doubt have to simply trust their suppliers a lot of the time. It's good to be aware of this, but I don't necessarily see a conspiracy--not to excuse its occurrence. Stricter oversight could be applied, but I imagine it would be very hard to enforce in such a large, diverse and globally expansive industry. I suggest buying from local markets/fisherman if you able and concerned enough. Or go fishing/crabbing yourself once in a while, it can be fun, cost efficient, and relaxing...if you catch anything that is.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 05:38 AM
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Originally posted by Sandalphon
Be honest. Call it fish in a can. Put on the side what it might contain. May contain traces of tuna.

If this is what the people get, what do the cats get in their canned food?


Funny you should say that, we feed our cat Whiskas tinned cat food and we buy the same two 'flavours' chicken and salmon every week. Every now and then, perhaps once every week or so, we will crack open a tin of the chicken flavour and he won't touch it. Just sniffs and looks at us like 'you expect me to eat this?!'. It makes me wonder what is different about this tin than the last one? Perhaps he knows when it's 'pretend' chicken.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 06:15 AM
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Originally posted by Goldcurrent
I ask you this.....when is enough, enough?
When will we hold companies and food inspection agencies accountable for transparency and honesty?


Just last night I read on the BBC that Asda Corned Beef was being recalled because it potentially contains Horse meat which also contains Bute. And I realized that I have some of it in my kitchen, and that I had it wish salad a few days ago.

Someone reassured me that it would only be minute traces, but that's not good enough. The most worrying thing for me is that these pedallers of trash have no clue about the heritage of their meat products, and hold little responsibility for what is in their food.

I should get what I pay for. If I buy Beef, I demand that it's f'ing Beef! But the idea that these retailers have no idea what is actually in their own food is what makes me sick, and what has now made me decide to boycott all processed meat products entirely, and boycott Asda too.

The other thing that scares me is that they have only been testing these products for Horse DNA, yet they admit that there is a criminal gang behind this. So tell me, if a criminal gang in some foreign country is doing this, are supposed to believe that expensive Horse meat is the only thing going into these products?

Put yourself in the shoes of the head of that criminal gang for a moment... would it make more sense to try to source Horses for your con, or would you make millions more by farming dogs, cats, or rats, in a warehouse somewhere?

That is why I believe the authorities have CHOSEN to only test for Horse DNA. They know that there is a bigger scandal here and they are terrified to look.

Also, I watched a historical program a couple of days ago about the dangers in the Victorian home, and how people were surrounding themselves with poisonous substances and dangerous new gadgets without knowing about it. There were no real regulations in place.

One of those things was green dye in fabrics and wallpapers, containing deadly levels of arsenic. Hundreds of thousands of people were becoming ill, and dying, inexplicably because of it. But, even when it was discovered, there was an active campaign by the companies responsible to cover it up, refuse responsibility, and governments pretty much agreed.

One of the most interesting things about this is that no real legislation came in to stop it, at least not in the UK. It was public perception that led to change, and the government did absolutely nothing. Technically, it is still not a criminal act to add arsenic to household products in this way, because nothing ever changed.

Incidentally, while checking for facts on this, I found another link that shows the state we are still in with regard to poisons in the home...

Study: Floors, wallpaper contain hazardous chemicals

We like to think that our governments and regulators are working hard to protect us from unscrupulous capitalists, but in reality they couldn't give a rats behind.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by Goldcurrent
restaurant chains such as McD's and Taco Bell serving meat mainly consisting of sawdust,


Do you have a link where I could read more about that?

I found an article where a ranch is feeding sawdust to beef cattle, but I've found nothing so far about using sawdust in the meat. I'm very interested.


edit on 4/10/13 by SherlockH because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by SherlockH

Originally posted by Goldcurrent
restaurant chains such as McD's and Taco Bell serving meat mainly consisting of sawdust,


Do you have a link where I could read more about that?

I found an article where a ranch is feeding sawdust to beef cattle, but I've found nothing so far about using sawdust in the meat. I'm very interested.


edit on 4/10/13 by SherlockH because: (no reason given)



Hi Sherlock,

Another member created a thread about this awhile ago.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


ETA, i should add that the cellulose content only reached as high as 35% in some cases, so I'll edit my original claim of 'mainly wood'. It is a significant portion in most processed foods though.

edit on 10-4-2013 by Goldcurrent because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by Threadfall
 


While I am relatively landlocked and certain fresh seafood selection is a misnomer, I do try eating as much fresh pickeral (walleye) to some, from our freshwater lakes. It is the best fish IMO.

I don't eat nearly enough though.



posted on Apr, 10 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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Hey no problem Pug, I have a corvette to sell you, and because it will make you feel good about the environment when you find out,let me take out the LT motor and swap in a 4 banger. You will never know.





Originally posted by Plugin
The consumer wan't first seat for cheapest price.

If it was real Tuna, the consumer wouldn't buy it. Too expensive. That said it's a good thing it's not Tuna, that fish specie is endangered.
I Always feel bad when I buy something with Tuna, this new article made me feel a bit better thanks.






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