Tying up some loose ends with a simple and easily manufactured Rope making machine.

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posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 11:14 AM
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Explanation: I was in the chat room talking with some loverly lady members and the issue of sewing came up as we were discussing babies and mothering skills ... and that segwayed into knitting and crotchet skills.

I sux at knitting and I do NOT understand crochet and my tailoring skills have much to be desired!


However I am not completely useless and I was able to remember a method on how to manufacture rope out of any type of available thread.

I was lucky enough to quikly find this ancient newspaper article on the device ...

14th June 1934 - Uses for Cotton Reels Making Woollen Ropes. [trove.nla.gov.au]



Personal Disclosure: I instantly realized just how valuable such information may be to my fellow ATS members and as I don't recall this specific survival subject being discussed before I felt it nessessary to post it asap.




posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 11:21 AM
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we should mail one of these to EVERY politician



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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Explanation: I was inspired to go look up some youtube vids for those members who are VERY interested in making rope and this was the 1st vid in my search results...



This is far more involved and far more technical than what my previous post detailed and I present it to show how rope is more properly made when not in a survival situation.

Personal Disclosure: I hope this helps!



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by OmegaLogos
 


This is great thanks!
It could come in incredibly handy, thanks OmegaLogos



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by OmegaLogos
 


i've made rope using a similar way, really not that hard. but you must be careful especially when making thick ropes, as if it parts the whipping can kill you or cause serious injury. still rather cool to see the vid.


there are al sorts of cool low tech devices that can be made and used, on the list of vids on youutube with that one even shows a human powered lathe. i know where i am at the moment you can buy treadle sewing machines and even treadle sergers.
in fact just about anything that uses an electric motor to run can be treadle, peddle or even water powered. our ancestors were quite ingenious in their machines without needing electricity. they even had simplistic cranes for building large buildings that were human or animal powered.



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by OmegaLogos
 


Great video. If anyone have any similar ones that go into more detail about the process I'd love to watch them. I'm especially interested in historic methods and how threads are made.





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