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The Incredible Resonant Stones of Campanayoq.- Ancient Meteorite ?

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posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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Just watch those kids beating those rocks and listen carefully at 0:15 of the video. And no, the sound is not part of the music and it wasn't added, the rock sounds just like a bell.




The name of the place is Campanayoq, "campana" in spanish means "bell". Probably the place had another name unknown by locals and lost in time.

The first words that came t my mind : "Huge ancient meteorite". What do you think ?

Forgot to mention, Andahuaylas is a department (state) of Peru, in the Andes.
edit on 5-4-2013 by Trueman because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-4-2013 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


very cool,,, have you heard about the pharaoh statues, that sung when wind blows in to the statues mouth,,,
they were broken and then fixed but the sound died...



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by solve
 


No, I didn't know. Was the sound recorded for someone ?



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


That's awsome trueman,
They are likely iron/nickle meteorites. Years ago Stewart Copeland , the drummer for the band " The Police", did a documentary about the origins of music, and he went to a place in Africa where a very large meteorite is exposed and for millenia people have been coming to it to pound in it and make music. The tone is dependent on where you hit it. People have been doing it for so long that there divots with into the rock that correspond to notes, Large groups of people will climb up on the rock and play a piece of music.
It was fascinating.

S and f



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


i believe it was told in egyptian legends but the statues were already damaged by water and time, they tried to fix it with plaster or cement.. not sure how long ago they sung their last song,,

your stones could be from a meteorite,, metals have acoustic properties....



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I'd love to watch that video, any link?

Thanks !



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 04:15 PM
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seems to me that the rocks experienced a lot of heat at one time. I have diabase tools that ting when hit. Whoever made them heated them after grinding them out of the soft rock to temper them so they could be flaked to sharpen them.

A meteor would have been heated when it came through the atmosphere. or if it at one time flew close to the sun.



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Hi trueman,
I found a small piece on YouTube
It was called 'The Rythmatist"
Unfortunately what I was able to find does not have the rock music.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Thanks, I couldn't wait and found it by myself yesterday. Yeah, too bad that part wasn't there.



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by solve
reply to post by Trueman
 


very cool,,, have you heard about the pharaoh statues, that sung when wind blows in to the statues mouth,,,
they were broken and then fixed but the sound died...


Can you kindly direct me to the right direction regarding these singing status, a link plz? Ive heard of similar status making music but never heard of one singing before!

Thanks in advance to you or anyone else who helps direct me to these supposing singing status.



posted on Apr, 6 2013 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by MegaSpace
 


It the collossi of memnon

In 27 BC, a large earthquake reportedly shattered the eastern colossus, collapsing it from the waist up and cracking the lower half. Following its rupture, the remaining lower half of this statue was then reputed to "sing" on various occasions- always within an hour or two of sunrise, usually right at dawn. The sound was most often reported in February or March, but this is probably more a reflection of the tourist season rather than any actual pattern. The description varied; Strabo said it sounded "like a blow", Pausanias compared it to "the string of a lyre" breaking, but it also was described as the striking of brass or whistling. The earliest report in literature is that of the Greek historian and geographer Strabo, who claimed to have personally heard the sound during a visit in 20 BC, by which time it apparently was already well-known. Other ancient sources include Pliny (not from personal experience, but he collected other reports), Pausanias, and Juvenal. In addition, the base of the statue is inscribed with about 90 surviving inscriptions of contemporary tourists reporting whether they had heard the sound or not.

en.m.wikipedia.org...






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