Roger Ebert dies.at age 70

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posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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I'm surprised that no one here on ATS has posted this yet, but film critic Roger Ebert has died at the age of 70. Sad.

I grew up watching he and Gene Siskil doing movie reviews giving their patented thumbs up or thumbs down to signify like(s) or dislike(s) of movies. Needless to say, he revolutionized the film critic's role on the world stage.

todayentertainment.today.com...




posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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It was only reported a day or two ago that his cancer was back, i'm shocked he died so quickly.

I give this news 2 thumbs down. RIP



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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There's a pretty vocal group of movie fans who like to hate on Ebert, but I always liked the guy. He introduced me to a ton of great movies at a young age and is responsible for me seeing a lot of my favorite movies. I've stopped reading him in the past couple years, just fell out of the habit, but I'd always go to see his thoughts on a movie I was particularly struck by.

It's a real shame.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Surprised? Why? Its literally breaking news that he died, breaking sad news that is.

I just heard yesterday that his cancer came back and he was planning on taking time away from work because of it so to hear that he is now dead is quite a sad shock.

RIP Roger, you will be missed.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 04:16 PM
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I always loved the guy even if hated his opinion at times...Now Siskel and Ebert can review films from the balcony in the great beyond...



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by Swills
 

Right, he just wrote a column for his newspaper saying he was going to focus on writing about only movies he really liked, and that he was cutting back a bit because of his cancer. He even talked of opening up a new outlet for his books, etc. I bet it was a heart attack and not the cancer (maybe related) because this was so quick after his forward-looking column came out.

I hope he has a massive Hollywood-type funeral, with "stars" from many nations flying in to attend it.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 04:34 PM
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I feel like I grew up with this guy, from his early show, to his online reviews, to his blog - I didn't always agree with him, but always had a lot of respect for him. He was a good reviewer, a good writer and truly one of the good guys...



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 04:54 PM
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I thought he died yesr ago? Ah just another one of those celebs that die many times?



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 05:43 PM
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I didn't agree with him either at all times, but I did like and respect him. I made this thread to honor him.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by lostbook
I didn't agree with him either at all times, but I did like and respect him. I made this thread to honor him.


And honor him you should. He and Gene Siskel made movie critics popular, especially on television. They had a chemistry which would have been hard to put together if somebody was trying - they just happened to be the movie critics at rival Chicago newspapers and found that they could play off each other really well. Ebert has a list of columns of "Great Movies" that he kept adding to every two weeks when he wasn't sick, and it numbers in the hundreds. That List is one of his finest legacies.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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Well my best wishes go out to his family and he seemed like a nice enough fellow but he made a career that absolutely never should have been.

He simply watched movies and gave his opinion on them, talk about something as worthless as the Kardashians are.

He was no more an expert than you or I are. I'm surprised at how many people bought into him and allowed him to get rich from giving his opinion.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
He simply watched movies and gave his opinion on them, talk about something as worthless as the Kardashians are.

He was no more an expert than you or I are. I'm surprised at how many people bought into him and allowed him to get rich from giving his opinion.


Ebert knew the movie business and loved every minute of it. You probably watch commentaries on movies. "They" say Ebert's commentary on "Citizen Kane" is the best commentary ever recorded. I enjoyed it, and learned much more about that film than I knew before hearing Ebert talk about it during the movie (and he kept talking and educating during the whole film, not like some commentaries which are half filled with dead air as the critic or "star" watches the movie). So I'd suggest getting Ebert's "Citizen Kane" commentary if you want a good taste of what he was capable of doing.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


I have the movie so why do I need someone to explain it to me?

I could talk over it also and probably explain the historical significance better than he could. A movie is there to be enjoyed and interpreted differently by those who watch it.

Someone giving their opinion on it does not mean that opinion is relevant to every person who views it. Its like viewing a piece of art with a critic who is telling you what you should be experiencing.

That is just wrong since everyone is different.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
Well my best wishes go out to his family and he seemed like a nice enough fellow but he made a career that absolutely never should have been.

He simply watched movies and gave his opinion on them, talk about something as worthless as the Kardashians are.

He was no more an expert than you or I are. I'm surprised at how many people bought into him and allowed him to get rich from giving his opinion.


Oh yeah? Let's see your movie reviews. Let's see your Pulitzer. He was a very good writer and had a wealth of knowledge and understanding of the movie business. In the end - he loved movies, and he did what he loved - he wrote about them. And the millions of other movie lovers out there embraced him. Movies are a big part of the social fabric - he helped people understand them, he engaged people and got them to think about the movies. I'd hardly call his career "worthless", but that's just my opinion...



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by redtic

Originally posted by Hopechest
Well my best wishes go out to his family and he seemed like a nice enough fellow but he made a career that absolutely never should have been.

He simply watched movies and gave his opinion on them, talk about something as worthless as the Kardashians are.

He was no more an expert than you or I are. I'm surprised at how many people bought into him and allowed him to get rich from giving his opinion.


Oh yeah? Let's see your movie reviews. Let's see your Pulitzer. He was a very good writer and had a wealth of knowledge and understanding of the movie business. In the end - he loved movies, and he did what he loved - he wrote about them. And the millions of other movie lovers out there embraced him. Movies are a big part of the social fabric - he helped people understand them, he engaged people and got them to think about the movies. I'd hardly call his career "worthless", but that's just my opinion...


I'm glad many people enjoyed him and its totally their right to do so. I just think its a waste of time listening to a movie or music critic but that is simply my own opinion.

I've nothing against Mr. Ebert whatsoever and I respectfully wish him the best journey wherever he is going.

Doesn't mean I have to agree with what he did for a career however.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 11:10 PM
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Man, I've been spending the past week reading through his old reviews on his website, and when I saw that he passed away, I felt a little shellshocked.

RIP Ebert.



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 08:27 AM
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That was quick.



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 04:45 PM
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good night, sweet prince





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