Sun May Still Have Low-Mass Solar Companion, Say Astrophysicists Searching NASA WISE Mission Data

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posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace

Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


We really don't have enough knowledge of the effect of things in the space outside the solar system to know what is happening.


The laws of physics (including gravity) are the same outside of the Solar System as they are inside. Besides, if there was such a thing as gas cloud and a star in a binary system, we would see examples of this. To my knowledge, we haven't seen anything like that.


How do we know the laws of Physics apply outside this solar system if we have never been out there. We assume they apply from what we observe. There are predominant scientists challenging the assumption that all the laws of physics apply throughout the universe, I am not alone. I take it a bit farther though and wonder if they all apply right outside the door of our solar system.

The actual properties of our Heliosphere were nothing that we would have expected previously. The scientists studying the voyager info are trying to figure it out now, they have many theories to work with. This is the kind of science I like to read, real evidence without speculation and scientists that admit that what they thought they knew was not what was out there. After voyager completely leaves the heliosphere, we will know more of reality. Till then I will keep believing that man thinks he knows more than he actually does.




posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Why would the Solar System have different laws of physics? It formed out of the same kind of gas cloud as we observe elsewhere, and in the same kind of galaxy as we observe elsewhere. We can study the Sun and other stars and find similarities between them. Our system is a snapshot of the countless other systems out there.

Can a universe function when there are differing laws of physics in each star system? You theory bears no logic.


If you think that our knowledge of the universe is limited to what a deep space probe encounters, then you're shooting yourself in the foot. It will take the Voyager many thousands of years to reach the Oort cloud (which I consider the edge of the Solar System). We can learn a lot by just looking at things and measuring them.

P.S. science is always about speculation and theorising. It's not like religion, where you have 100% certainty and the absolutes. We constantly learn more as we keep looking, and so far from what we have seen, same laws of physics apply everywhere.
edit on 2-4-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


But you are comparing solar systems to solar systems. I am talking of the properties outside the solar systems. I am sure the knowledge we have within this bubble would be similar to other bubbles out there. Some of the laws of physics will apply to the areas outside of solar systems also but there is no evidence that all of them will apply. I do not know exactly what capabilities Voyager has other than it has lived a long time because it was well built back then.
edit on 2-4-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by wildespace
 


But you are comparing solar systems to solar systems. I am talking of the properties outside the solar systems. I am sure the knowledge we have within this bubble would be similar to other bubbles out there. Some of the laws of physics will apply to the areas outside of solar systems also but there is no evidence that all of them will apply. I do not know exactly what capabilities Voyager has other than it has lived a long time because it was well built back then.
edit on 2-4-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)


You can't just say: the laws of gravity are different outside our solar system.

If the laws of gravity were different outside our solar system, it would be an observable effect. It would be seen.

Celestial motion of other stars and galaxies are observed. Exo Planets that have been discovered are orbiting their stars, just as the laws of gravity say they should.

If the laws of gravity were different outside of our solar system stars would not form that we have seen are forming (such as the Orion's Nebula, where it can be seen quite clearly).

If the laws of gravity were not the same as in our solar system, the gravitation lensing would not work, and we have many, many, MANY observations of this effect.

If the laws of gravity were not the same outside our solar system, large stars would not go super nova (another thing that has been observed, time and time again).

The only time that the laws of physics break down (your "bubbles" that you mentioned) is when we're around special things like black holes. Once inside those special "bubbles" in our universe, then yes, space, time and gravity all work differently.

But not in between the stars. Sorry, but you have it backwards.

You can submit this as a claim, but there is not even any supporting evidence to make into a hypothesis. Where as all our observational data collected over literally centuries continue to uphold the laws of physics outside our solar system.





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