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Sun May Still Have Low-Mass Solar Companion, Say Astrophysicists Searching NASA WISE Mission Data

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posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:27 PM
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www.forbes.com...

I know many of you here maintain that "something is out there" that could pose us danger. A brown dwarf is extremely unlikely (it would have been discovered by now), but a gas-giant planet is fair game, and it wouldn't present any danger to us.

Astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire proposed the existence of the Sun's binary companion back in 2010. www.nasa.gov...

By year’s end, Matese says the WISE team will likely announce whether a one- to two-mass Jupiter object like Tyche can be definitively rejected as a possible solar companion.




posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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Cool find...just a question who gets to name it if found?



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by boymonkey74
 


Adam Nibiru, the head of the scientist team working on the project.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 01:36 PM
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I watched a program on sci channel about tyche , and the nemesis theory,
but it said nether theory could be proven nor disproven.

This is what got me reading ATS to start with figured maybe you guys
Aren't as crazy as you sound, hmm well maybe not all of you

Also it said they did confirm a new planet in our Solar System its way out there,
they don't know if got knocked out that far, or if is a dwarf planet or a planet that
never got finished.

Believe it was called sirus or something like that. If I knew how to post or do anything
for that matter with a computer I would put it up for you.


Very cool thread I love this stuff!



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Matese and Whitmire...Aren't they the "Tyche" guys? If so, then there have been past threads on this.

Here's one from about 2 years ago:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Most of the "Tyche" threads have been about Nibiru. However, "Tyche" can't be Nibiru, because the theoretical orbit of Tyche does not bring it anywhere near the inner solar system, like the mythical Nibiru supposedly does.

Here's another thread about this Matese and Whitmire discovery, but this thread is hiding unde rthe "Nibiru" label:
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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The sun sure is part of a binary solar system. Nice to see an article about it.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by clairvoyantrose
The sun sure is part of a binary solar system. Nice to see an article about it.

You know this how, exactly? You take an article that says they're still looking for, but haven't found, a large planet at Oort cloud distances as proof of that?



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 07:43 AM
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Why does it have to be a planet? Couldn't the hypothetical Oort cloud itself have enough mass to make a binary body? Not everything has to fit into our definitions.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:01 AM
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The Oort Cloud consists of all the matter that was "ejected" from the Solar System by gravitational interactions during its formation. These planetesimals are passing through the cloud on their way to, or back from, their apohelia. There is no need for an invisible body to perturb them. They are slowly raining back down into the inner Solar System to complete their four billion year plus orbits.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


It is bizarre to think there could be another body out there that has remained unobserved for so long (considering, astronomically speaking, that it would be so close). If confirmed, it really would be a good demonstration of our knowledge of the Universe (diddly squat, but improving).

Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if our Solar System has a name? I have tried searching (including the legendary ATS search) but not turned anything up so far. I realise it isn't relevant to the thread but am curious nontheless - it is something else that strikes me as bizarre that i can find names for various things but not for our Solar System!



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
Why does it have to be a planet? Couldn't the hypothetical Oort cloud itself have enough mass to make a binary body? Not everything has to fit into our definitions.


Because our sun can't orbit a cloud that surrounds it.

In a binary system, you either have our sun orbiting something, that something orbiting the sun, or they both orbit around a common point.
The theoretical Oort Cloud surrounds our solar system, and is made up a many smaller bodies that orbit the sun. Even if there is a large gas giant out there, it would not make our solar system a true "binary" system. It would simply be another planet that is in orbit around our sun.

For a true binary system, you would need something that masses at least as big as a brown dwarf or larger. A brown dwarf is classified as such if it is 15 Jupiter masses or more.
So even if they do find something, and even if it's 5 Jupiter masses, it would still be considered a gas giant orbiting our sun, but it would not classify our system as binary.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by wildespace
 


It is bizarre to think there could be another body out there that has remained unobserved for so long (considering, astronomically speaking, that it would be so close). If confirmed, it really would be a good demonstration of our knowledge of the Universe (diddly squat, but improving).

Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if our Solar System has a name? I have tried searching (including the legendary ATS search) but not turned anything up so far. I realise it isn't relevant to the thread but am curious nontheless - it is something else that strikes me as bizarre that i can find names for various things but not for our Solar System!


Sol

That is the Latin name for the sun, and is the main stay name for our solar system in Sci Fi novels, movies, etc.

If we were to leave here and colonize another system, that is more than likely what our solar system would be referred to:

The Sol System.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 



Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if our Solar System has a name? I have tried searching (including the legendary ATS search) but not turned anything up so far. I realise it isn't relevant to the thread but am curious nontheless - it is something else that strikes me as bizarre that i can find names for various things but not for our Solar System!


Yes, it is called the Solar System. Planetary systems around other stars are called solar systems, no caps, or planetary systems or are named after their sun (note lower case) such as the Alpha Centauri System. This follows the convention of calling planets' satellites moons, but our own satellite the Moon.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


Brilliant, thank you very much. A perfect example of why i love our species there - it demonstrates both a complete search for knowledge (acknowledgement of other Solar Systems) and also extreme arrogance! (in that it is The as opposed to the).



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You can use a lot of light gas to balance a piece of iron, just go to the gas company to get your propane tank filled. We are nowhere near the middle of the hypothetical Oort cloud.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You can use a lot of light gas to balance a piece of iron, just go to the gas company to get your propane tank filled. We are nowhere near the middle of the hypothetical Oort cloud.


Exactly what does filling a propane tank have to do with Orbital Mechanics and Gravitation ?

A propane tank is a enclosed structure that is able to hold a gas that is under pressure.

Has nothing to do with large celestial bodies that orbit other celestial bodies as near as I can tell. Care to elaborate on that?

Also "we are no where near the center of the Oort Cloud "

Okay. Then exactly where do you think the Oort cloud is? You are saying that it is not this?



Please explain your claims.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Well, maybe I have the wrong name for the cloud I am talking about.
There is another sort of cloud we are in in the milky way.

The Oort cloud is hypothetical, it isn't even a theory yet. Sounds as if not enough evidence is reven there to prove it's existence yet.
edit on 2-4-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Well, maybe I have the wrong name for the cloud I am talking about.
There is another sort of cloud we are in in the milky way.

The Oort cloud is hypothetical, it isn't even a theory yet. Sounds as if not enough evidence is reven there to prove it's existence yet.
edit on 2-4-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)


You're thinking of interstellar clouds, like the one our solar system is entering that are part of the structure of our galaxy.

We don't really orbit them (nor they us). We go through or near them. They are so large that they are measured in light years.

While their total mass can be great, you also have to consider how that mass is distributed.

Let's use your propane bottle as an example. All that propane is contained in a small area, making it under pressure of course, but that mass is concentrated in a small area.

If we took all that gas in the bottle and allowed it to expand (say a very large balloon), it would still have the same mass, but it's now distributed over a large area.

In many ways this is like the sun. All that hydrogen gas it's made of is concentrated into a ball 880,000 miles wide. Because all that mass of hydrogen is concentrated into a small area, our planet can orbit it. However, if you were to take all that hydrogen, and expanded it out to several light years, we'd no longer would orbit it, because though it's entire mass has not changed, it's no longer concentrated in to a small area that we can orbit.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


We really don't have enough knowledge of the effect of things in the space outside the solar system to know what is happening. Maybe once Explorer gets out of this bubble we may know more of what is out there.


Yeah, but propane is still effected by gravity. My neighbor had a propane leak in his basement and the gas laid on the floor. It was quite an explosion but there wasn't quite enough to destroy the rest of the house. I guess He got hurt though from being thrown.
edit on 2-4-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


We really don't have enough knowledge of the effect of things in the space outside the solar system to know what is happening.


The laws of physics (including gravity) are the same outside of the Solar System as they are inside. Besides, if there was such a thing as gas cloud and a star in a binary system, we would see examples of this. To my knowledge, we haven't seen anything like that.





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