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Survival - Long Term in Wilderness

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posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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Survival is atleast more achievable for short period of time, but what about Long term wilderness survival like a year or so? You'll have to survive weather, illness, injuries, predators, starvation and dehydration among others problems. It's a long list of challenges and what if you were limited to what you could carry in backpack loaded down with tools, supplies and no vehicles but you could use one horse, how will you plan your gears, strategies and what location would you chose ?




posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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If you want some idea what you may have to face with in just one day check out this guy and his show survivorman
edit on 28-3-2013 by Shadow Herder because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by Trackhunter
Survival is atleast more achievable for short period of time, but what about Long term wilderness survival like a year or so? You'll have to survive weather, illness, injuries, predators, starvation and dehydration among others problems. It's a long list of challenges and what if you were limited to what you could carry in backpack loaded down with tools, supplies and no vehicles but you could use one horse, how will you plan your gears, strategies and what location would you chose ?


1 would study the animal life present in the region 1 is in and live like they do and survive like they do of the LAND...

NAMASTE*******



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 04:45 PM
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That's the main reason for planning ahead isn't it? Make 10 trips fully loaded to an isolated spot before the SHTF, rather than carry everything you need all at once. Maybe I am lost on the idea.



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by Trackhunter
 


Practice for a few weekends and update your bag for what you need.
The only way you will know is by experience.

Experience it,think about it and adapt your attitude and bag.

Try in winter to live for 2 days in minus 30 and then update your bag.
Try in summer in blackfly season and update your bag.
Try in harvest season (fall) and update your bag.
Try in spring when things are still thawing and then update your bag.

Knowledge and experience is power....words on a screen are sketchy.
People will have alot of opinions yet have never done it in real life.
Experience counts so thats my advice.

Also,watching tv survival shows don't count(although there is useful information)...do it for real in simulations.

edit on 28-3-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 05:01 PM
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there IS a survival perseverance program within the instinct to adapt with minimal resources. How did man get everywhere from last bottleneck? Its in the instincts embedded. Practice is great, just remember designed to survive. Some wonder if its good or bad the support or extra care recent its good and VERY time consuming to re start
so invisible rf @ times or guide.



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


My last trip was 2 weeks ago and it was minus 18 overnight.
I had boots with no ankle support and i screwed my ankle up and was wondering how i was going to get home.

I tied my boot tight and walked out and the next day,my ankle was alright sort of,compared to how it was.

I think there is a reason there is a saying that says "walk it off"
I walked about 7 kms home.
A lesson lived is a lesson learned.

That was my first time dealing with injury in the middle of nowhere and i learned from it.

edit on 28-3-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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Reply to post by Shadow Herder
 


Like most of people i don't these 'reality' survival shows. He has people waiting near by to help him incase of emergency. Have to agree with DrumsRfun about "A lesson lived is a lesson learned."


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 06:01 PM
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Reply to post by 200Plus
 


Yeah and more importantly how to plan each individual items for long term usage. Like guns, should you carry one handgun or maybe two. What sort of shelters would you use or clothing, etc. how much is enough?


 
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posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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I am spoiled I guess. I served in the military and we got a lot of useful training (if you paid attention).

-Different bags for different uses (patrol/ 3-day/ 10-day/ camp)

-Planned sites need to be prepared. The army has various people to fill is function. Medics, engineers, grunts, cooks, many others. As an individual (not recommended) a person will have to do all of them. So, multiple trips will most likely be required.

-An E&E exercise is vastly different than long term survival. Staying on the go requires fortitude and no site prep (as I would assume constant motion).

- always a good idea to have a proper topographical map of the are you plan to reside. It can actually be a cornucopia of knowledge if you are fluent with maps. Animal bedding, likely routes of travel, shelter possibilities, water sources can all be gleaned from a decent map.



posted on Mar, 29 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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Long term is not survivable for a single person, if that person is on the move. The only chance they'd have, and slim at best, would be to move south and hope to outrun ole man winter. If the proper woodcraft is known, a slight chance of survival may be possible in the south where food would be slightly more available.

I used to live in Vt., with the Green Mtns. as my back yard. If I was still there, and faced the threats of today, I'd already have prepared a place, deep in the woods. I drove, hiked, and hunted them thar hills enough to know several places that could keep me hidden for quite a time.

A lot would still depend though, on the time of year. Spring would be best. The whole growing and harvest season would be open to stock the larder. Autumn second best. You can still harvest nuts and berries, as well as hunt enough meat to smoke and dry. Winter... You'd better have enough commercial products stored away to make it through. Possible to still hunt deer, maybe a few birds, to supplement, but you'll need canned/dried veggies, fruit, nuts, etc.

All in all, I wouldn't want to face it alone.



posted on Mar, 29 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by Trackhunter
 


In most SHTF scenarios, there would be far less people, so an abundance of empty homes. Why live in the woods?






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