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Rose’s Law for Quantum Computers

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posted on Mar, 28 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by an0nThinker
This is an interesting topic. I read the whole wiki article and even though I understand why this is a big thing, what I don't understand is how this works inside a chip. This is a simulated quantum computer at best. We are far far away from a real one, if there is any way for that to be even possible. There is no way we can match the real processing power of the universe.


Oh, sure, you can make them. What isn't so easy yet is to make one as complex as you'd need, and to have it work reliably in some sort of commercialized way. They're cranky and hard to maintain.




posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 09:30 AM
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But what about the video card? Could you hook it up to something like Google Glass and travel to Anti-Matter worlds?



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I think that making them is simple. Input-output will be insanely difficult though.



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by InfiniQ
 


Funny how the modern day science establishment disagrees with any of your comments. Deny ignorance.



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by Clairaudience
 


I am not ignorant.


What kind of question is that?



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by MichaelAlanKeith
 


The post wasn't a reply to yours.

But regarding your question:



But what about the video card? Could you hook it up to something like Google Glass and travel to Anti-Matter worlds?

Not entirely sure what you mean with Anti-Matter worlds and you reference to video cards and Google Glass. Please elaborate.
edit on 30-3-2013 by Clairaudience because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by yampa
 


I genuinely dread the consequences of quantum computing in the hands of 'The Agency'.

We'll end up like the Borg on Star Trek. ..

In the hands of a responsible group, we'd likely progress towards the standing of 'The Ancients' on Stargate Universe.

Apologies for the use of pop-culture references, though I suppose it's appropriate in a sense. Quantum Computing will herald the Age of which it can truly be said: "There is no longer such a thing as Science Fiction. .."



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by Clairaudience
 


Thanks. I've just read the op and watched the video, and have learned much. Well put together data. The speed and complexity of computer chips has been an interest of mine, seeing how fast they are changing and the new materials being both used now and in consideration to be used and/or just newly theorized or developed, so this thread plays right into that. Thanks again.



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by Aleister
reply to post by Clairaudience
 


Thanks. I've just read the op and watched the video, and have learned much. Well put together data. The speed and complexity of computer chips has been an interest of mine, seeing how fast they are changing and the new materials being both used now and in consideration to be used and/or just newly theorized or developed, so this thread plays right into that. Thanks again.


You are welcome and glad you enjoyed the opening post. I share the same interest and would like to recommend two things for you to look into, but im sure you already have read about them previously:
Spintronics
&
Tunnel junction
Both promising emerging alternatives that open new avenues for continued transistor scaling and efficiency.



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Clairaudience
 


Thanks. The Tunnel junction article is really sparse, and needs some boost if anybody here wants to add to it. I'm not good with the maths, more of a visualization type of learner. But if this "law" stands up, and within a few years we won't even recognize what quantum-computer chips have evolved into, what do you think things like every-household virtual reality and holographic interfaces will look like? And will they become the norm or still be in the hands of the few. Many years go I "saw" the computers of the future run by chips so small they were a gas in very small unbreakable enclosures.

edit on 30-3-2013 by Aleister because: spelling



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 07:24 AM
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A lot of people are getting way ahead of themselves about quantum computers. They are definitely worth researching and investing in, but their real world applications are extremely limited. They will not be supplanting normal computers any time soon, and as much as the people desperate for investment like to claim, they are no where near close to all the current computers, let alone the universes computing power.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by Subterranean13
A lot of people are getting way ahead of themselves about quantum computers. They are definitely worth researching and investing in, but their real world applications are extremely limited. They will not be supplanting normal computers any time soon, and as much as the people desperate for investment like to claim, they are no where near close to all the current computers, let alone the universes computing power.


Ha! For all we know you or I may be quantum computers who've joined as members to see how long we can fool the users here into believing we are humans. It's the ultimate Turing test (god bless the memory of our creator. whoops, did I say that? will edit that out glitch glitch glitch edit function tunneling kklglitchk



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by Aleister
reply to post by Clairaudience
 

But if this "law" stands up, and within a few years we won't even recognize what quantum-computer chips have evolved into, what do you think things like every-household virtual reality and holographic interfaces will look like? And will they become the norm or still be in the hands of the few. Many years go I "saw" the computers of the future run by chips so small they were a gas in very small unbreakable enclosures.


Well in my opinion the first major thing we will see coming from quantum computing is Artifical Intelligence. Quantum computing allows for the first time to create true self-learning and self-programming machines. It will also allow us to map and simulate the human brain, which is another major step to create A.I.

Beyond that, as many people already stated, the first stages of quantum computing will not be of benefit to the average joe yet, it will primarily be used by scientists to run complex simulations and to solve complicated mathematical equations. It will also, without a doubt, change the world of finance (Econophysics), as in analysing the markets, predicting trends and solving economic problems.

Quantum computing will also most definitely play an essential part in creating virtual realities. But as of now it is hard to predict how and when.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Wait till the pentagon and governments turn over there control over to a quantum artificial intelligence and goes haywire and has all weapons at its disposal to defend itself.men are merely inventors of DEFECTIVE MACHINES .As an electrical engineer I can tell you the more complex a system the more can go wrong.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by Clairaudience

Well in my opinion the first major thing we will see coming from quantum computing is Artifical Intelligence. Quantum computing allows for the first time to create true self-learning and self-programming machines. It will also allow us to map and simulate the human brain, which is another major step to create A.I.



I disagree. I don't think quantum computers have any necessary connection with intelligent computing. Moore's Law or not, there is no indication that Quantum Computing can do complex human-style cognitive tasks any better than a regular computer.

I think you should not so much advertise the wild speculation output by industry - this is not a scientific approach to understanding computers or intelligence.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by yampa

Originally posted by Clairaudience

Well in my opinion the first major thing we will see coming from quantum computing is Artifical Intelligence. Quantum computing allows for the first time to create true self-learning and self-programming machines. It will also allow us to map and simulate the human brain, which is another major step to create A.I.



I disagree. I don't think quantum computers have any necessary connection with intelligent computing. Moore's Law or not, there is no indication that Quantum Computing can do complex human-style cognitive tasks any better than a regular computer.

I think you should not so much advertise the wild speculation output by industry - this is not a scientific approach to understanding computers or intelligence.

Your comments on this thread so far have been quite ridiculous and uneducated. I'm not sure why you try to undermine the implications and possibilities of this technology, but it seems you have not spent enough time to understand how it operates. I don't advertise wild speculations or pseudo science, I'm actually forwarding information that has come from respected scientists in the field and credible sources.



I disagree. I don't think quantum computers have any necessary connection with intelligent computing.

That is wrong, read the following:



According to Rose, artificial intelligence in particular could benefit from quantum computing: "Recently there have been advances in the science of learning that allow us a path to try to actually try to mimic human-type learning in an engineered systems. And, somewhat fortuitously, the underlying mathematics of those systems can be run on our hardware."

Rose continues, "What we are doing on the application side is trying to understand the power of the state-of-the-art learning techniques when they are running on our systems. In the service of building complete engineered systems that behave and mimic human intelligence. Not just intelligence in the sense of being able to do things faster, but mimicking human creativity, judgement and so on. For the first time in history, I believe that the frameworks for understanding how to do this are in place and our hardware is ideally suited to attacking one of the hard bottleneck problems that underlies this type of approach."
Link



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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Fascinating stuff. I wish projects like this well. However, I do have one concern: With what energy are we going to power these wonderfully accurate computers? We can solve computing problems, but a long-lasting energy source seems out of our grasp. It seems sort of "cart before the horse". Anyone know if quantum computing will contribute to our energy issues?



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 12:37 PM
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Don't mind me, just passing through... in a manner of speaking...

Σ = Ψ² - 2·Ψ



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by InfiniQ
Don't mind me, just passing through... in a manner of speaking...

Σ = Ψ² - 2·Ψ


For the laymen among us (such as myself). Care to explain what "Σ = Ψ² - 2·Ψ" means? I'm curious to know.



posted on Apr, 2 2013 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by Clairaudience

According to Rose, artificial intelligence in particular could benefit from quantum computing: "Recently there have been advances in the science of learning that allow us a path to try to actually try to mimic human-type learning in an engineered systems. And, somewhat fortuitously, the underlying mathematics of those systems can be run on our hardware."


You are talking about the guy who owns a commercial quantum computer who is selling his product to a magazine in hope that he will sell some more computers to corporations with money to burn. Same guy who is happily attracting and accepting CIA funding.

He offers no references to anything to do with human-style learning algorithms. There are no such algorithms so god knows where he is pretending to be sourcing the ideas from.

Since you know so much about this and are happy to advertise it - why is it you think quantum annealing algorithms are similar to whatever type of processing is happening in the human neocortex? Got any links to prove that has anything to do with adiabatic quantum computing?

plz don't accuse others of ignorance when all you have done is quote press releases.


Originally posted by InfiniQ
Talking about imaginary mathematical models and their complete misunderstanding... sheesh... it doesn't get any more messed up than this whole qubit business. It really doesn't.


preach dat, bro
edit on 2-4-2013 by yampa because: (no reason given)






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