Student Develops Ocean Cleanup Array That Could Remove 7,250,000 Tons Of Plastic From the World's O

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posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:30 PM
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19-year-old Boyan Slat has unveiled plans to create an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans. The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Instead of moving through the ocean, the array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel. The angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from plankton, filtered and stored for recycling. Read more: 19-Year-Old Student Develops Ocean Cleanup Array That Could Remove 7,250,000 Tons Of Plastic From the World's Oceans | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building


inhabitat.com...



This is the kind of technology that we need. I recently watched a video on ATS about a small island out in the middle of the Pacific. All the birds where dying from ingesting plastic. There are massive amounts of plastic in the ocean and these deivices could be really helpful in cleaning up the oceans. It would be nice if they used them on the great pacific garbage patch. But who would pay for it...

edit on 31-3-2013 by Kandinsky because: fixed title typo




posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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Now that is the best thing I have heard in a while!!!!

What a superb idea to held clean up our mess!

Great find OP! thanks for posting S+F




posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by Teye22
 


Good start

Even smarter would be it running autonomous and on the plastic parts by using them as fuel



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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Reply to post by purplemer
 


I sincerely hope that theory meets reality in this instance.

Time will tell if its economically feasible.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by EartOccupant
 


I do not think it has a fuel source. I does not say they do it the article. I would guess they use the currents to turn...But yes it would be good to use the plastics as a fuels source.



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by EartOccupant
reply to post by Teye22
 


Good start

Even smarter would be it running autonomous and on the plastic parts by using them as fuel


I'd imagine that the solar panels on the top are good enough to run the thing. Also, using plastic as fuel isn't necessarily environmentally beneficial, which is the aim of this project.

If you're referencing autonomous, as in mobility and the ability to do this on its own in the pursuit of plastic, I think you're wrong.

I would think it would be best if these things remain rather stationary, maybe drift incredibly slowly to cover a large area. But then again, that's why it's going to be so big and there will be multiple of them, if I'm not mistaken.

If there's a way to quickly analyze large volumes of water as to the amounts of plastic, then maybe it could be mobile. Although, I still think that would be a waste of time.

In addition, to think of what it would require for an unmanned vehicle, requiring little maintenance to actually turn plastic into a fuel, or even to burn it for an engine is ridiculous. But hey, maybe there's so engineers up to the job, although it's not necessary considering solar energy.
edit on 26-3-2013 by retirednature because: additional comment



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Whooo, fingers and toes crossed that major industrial nations and the United Nations combine to use something like this tech to scoop up that plastic. Even since I first heard of the plastic monstrocities in some spots in the ocean, and the horror stories of people finding plastic floating in water furthest out from any land (not to mention the stuff in the Pacific from the Japan disaster) I've wondered why nations and organizations aren't making clean-up of this junk a high priority. Now the youngster points the way, and all he needs is a few champions with clout.



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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This link is to the project

It would be great to see this project in operation. They need several specialist to get it going but it could even be profitable with the recycled materials.
edit on 26-3-2013 by Twilightgem because: more to say



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


I think the reason they aren't making clean-up of this junk a high priority is because the oceans do not really belong to anyone. So everyone think it is not there problem. But really it is all our problems. It really would be nice to see the oceans cleaner. I live on an island and the amount of plastic that comes in on some of the beaches is really sad.



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by Twilightgem
 


Thanks for the link. I did not notice the size of the things until I saw that picture larger. They are huge. The man looks small standing on it...



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by retirednature

Originally posted by EartOccupant
reply to post by Teye22
 


Good start

Even smarter would be it running autonomous and on the plastic parts by using them as fuel


I'd imagine that the solar panels on the top are good enough to run the thing. Also, using plastic as fuel isn't necessarily environmentally beneficial, which is the aim of this project.

If you're referencing autonomous, as in mobility and the ability to do this on its own in the pursuit of plastic, I think you're wrong.

I would think it would be best if these things remain rather stationary, maybe drift incredibly slowly to cover a large area. But then again, that's why it's going to be so big and there will be multiple of them, if I'm not mistaken.

If there's a way to quickly analyze large volumes of water as to the amounts of plastic, then maybe it could be mobile. Although, I still think that would be a waste of time.

In addition, to think of what it would require for an unmanned vehicle, requiring little maintenance to actually turn plastic into a fuel, or even to burn it for an engine is ridiculous. But hey, maybe there's so engineers up to the job, although it's not necessary considering solar energy.
edit on 26-3-2013 by retirednature because: additional comment


You are mistaken.

Go back and read the information.......

try to actually read the information presented before you comment next time.



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by RobertF
 


I'm struggling to find conflict with what I said and the article. I went to the official site for the project and found the following:




Problem: The plastic is not static, it moves around.
Solution: Why move trough the oceans, if the oceans can move through you?
Fix the sea water processors to the sea bed, and save vast amounts of funds, manpower and emissions.


Which I addressed, no problem here...






Problem: Conventional clean-up ideas have never been financially realistic, let alone remediation of millions of square kilometres.
Solution: This concept is so efficient, that we estimate that by selling the plastic retrieved from the 5 gyres, we would make in fact more money than the plan would cost to execute. In other words; it's profitable.



Which shoots down the idea of needing to use the plastic as fuel.

What's going to power the thing?




Problems: A clean-up operation would generate significant emissions. Besides that, in high seas much plastic would escape.
Solution: The platforms will be completely self-supportive, receiving their energy from e.g. the sun, currents and waves.
And by letting the platforms' wings sway like an actual manta ray, we can ensure contacts of the inlets with the surface, even in the roughest weather.



So where was I mistaken? Maybe instead of just saying "read the article again", you might actually want to state the issue instead of claiming there is one.

Wait a minute, lol... that was sarcasm, wasn't it?
edit on 27-3-2013 by retirednature because: additional comment



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 01:59 AM
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I *love* this idea. It should be started today, and I don't think it should matter if it's economically feasible...we should pay to have this happen. We made the mess after all.



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 02:42 AM
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Nice idea, but like electric cars, unpractical and a waste of time.

Juts consider leaving a giant structure floating on the sea. It eventually would be come sea junk as well when the ocean breaks it up.

Like I said, nice idea but... well.... has anyone thought of what I have about this plan?



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 02:42 AM
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Wow, this is awesome! I hope he gets to implement it



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 05:52 AM
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reply to post by pacifier2012
 





Nice idea, but like electric cars, unpractical and a waste of time. Juts consider leaving a giant structure floating on the sea. It eventually would be come sea junk as well when the ocean breaks it up.


What makes you think these are unpractical. They are made to withstand oceanic weather and currents. They run at a profit and clean the sea of plastic pollutants.

What is unpractical is having a mess like this in our oceans and doing nothing about it..

edit on 27-3-2013 by purplemer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 06:03 AM
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Originally posted by purplemer
reply to post by EartOccupant
 


I do not think it has a fuel source. I does not say they do it the article. I would guess they use the currents to turn...But yes it would be good to use the plastics as a fuels source.


The photo clearly shows solar panels on the roof of the device. There's your power source. Nice and renewable.



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 06:13 AM
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I suggested something similar like this a couple months ago to US gov website. A rig like that out at sea to capture the garbage. Yes it will cost initial money, but we created the problem and we're the only ones that can fix it. The salvaged plastic can be used to make new products or fuel/oil. It's a win win win. It's good to see others out there that think the same way.

1. Clean up the environment.
2. Create jobs.
3. Sell the plastic to fund the project.



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by palg1
 


Thanks for that. I didnt notice that when I initially put the thread up I was tired. But yes these arrays use solar power. I nice clean source of energy.



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by purplemer
reply to post by palg1
 


Thanks for that. I didnt notice that when I initially put the thread up I was tired. But yes these arrays use solar power. I nice clean source of energy.


Theres more power to be harvested from the ocean using wave power,its more constant than solar,hydrolics will last longer and be more stronger than panels,id like too see these thing floating for years just plodding away with minimum contact from people,id also like there to be an autonmous little brother one that comes and swaps the collecting bucket and can dock with that one and get a little recharge from this one,wave power can build up forever.

The ocean provides # loads of free power too do things,how much energy has the ocean created and how stupid are we for not being efficent and utilizing something thats always switched on.

Finaly,we should be utilizing this young mans brain because it seems to be switched on too,very rare these days.





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