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Flash in the sky and related electrical outages

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posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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I'm not sure this is the forum to post this but I've just read a report on another (football related) website.

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Out walking the dog about 10ish over the fells at cross gate moor near Neville's cross in Durham, all of a sudden a bright light appeared, lit up up the whole sky for around a second then all went dark again. Seconds later every house I could see,s electricity went off for a few seconds. Anybody else see this or experience this or the power cut...mental n.b. before says it was lightening it wasn't, it was deathly silent the whole time.


Does anyone have any idea what could have caused this? Could it just have been a coincidence of a meteor with normal power failures?

This is Durham, England btw.




posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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Something like this perhaps?
z6mag.com...



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:36 PM
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Lightening can do that too...



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thats a very good possibility, Phage. I'll pass on the suggestion.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by shells4u
 


Sorry, Shells, but the person making the report specifically ruled out lightning. Thanks for your suggestion, though.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I'm curious, does the UK use similar transformers to the US?

They do have them at main power stations and substations I think, but you don't see them strapped to pylons like in the US and I have never heard of the type of explosion you normally see in the US over here in the UK.

I have done a small Google search (and Youtube) to no avail.

I honestly don't know the answer, so any light on the subject would be appreciated.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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Ancient stone circle and ley energy releasing to counteract the weather weapon being used against the UK.

Durham is part of the Orion sacred ley line construction.

Storm UKKO means UK Knocked Out.

Don't worry it can't hurt us it's just for defence.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Except the Op said lights went off in houses for only a few seconds. If it were a substation explosion I would think lights would be off for quite awhile until the substations got back online.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 


Good point. I've Googled a few substation explosions and it seems to take a few hours to re-route power rather than a few seconds.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 

Not necessarily a substation.
A smaller transformer could blow causing breakers in the area to reset.
It just sounds like something like that to me.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I honestly don't think the UK uses transformers in the same way the US does, I'm frantically searching for information now on the subject.

EDIT: What I mean is, the US seems to have a lot more of them scattered about, here in the UK, I am sure they are only found at the generating plants (step-up) and substations (step-down), and if the step-down blows, anyone on that substation is without power until it is repaired.
edit on 25/3/13 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 09:30 PM
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I'm in the energy business and this sounds like a typical overhead HV feeder fault (something like 11kV to 33kV) that can be a failed insulator, possum, bird, conductors clashing due to a vehicle hitting a pole, wind causing conductors to clash or tree branches touching a phase etc. It doesn't take a pole transformer exploding which is a very rare event compared to my other possibilities and the flash is brilliant, lighting up the entire sky particularly when there's some cloud cover. I've seen them myself and it's quite spectacular plus I was in a position (my job) to find out exactly where the fault occurred.

These feeders usually have auto-reclose relays on the circuit breakers at the source which reclose the circuit breaker a set time after the trip (normally 10-60 seconds or so) and if the breaker trips again on the reclose due to the fault still being detected, the protection locks the breaker out requiring a patrol to identify and clear the fault plus reset the protection before a manual attempt at restoration can be done. Some very remote areas can be arranged to have multiple auto-reclose shots in places where animals on the lines are very common and it takes hours to organize a patrol to get to the site (hoping to blast the fault off and not require a team out in the wilderness at all hours of the night). Despite possum guards on the wood poles and special construction to reduce large birds causing faults we still get many such faults every day in bushy areas with 90% or more of auto-recloses being successful.



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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Something I didn't clarify in the post above:

Loss of a single 11kV feeder could black out over 1000 homes.
Higher voltage feeder trips would put proportionally more homes in the dark for anything from seconds to hours.



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by Pilgrum
 


Thanks for that, Pilgrum! I think you've just explained it.

Although I doubt it was a possum in County Durham!





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