Which is better - British or American Beer?

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posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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woooo - after the "which is better - british or american music?" thread - the Beer question came to mind, which will no doubt touch a nerve or three on both sides of the Atlantic.

I'll lay my cards on the table - i've never tried much in the way of beers from the states - Budweiser and Coors are probably the limits of my experience here... and jeez, bud even stole the name from a vastly superior and older Czech beer, and then good old bud tried to sue them to stop them using the name!

like most brits i think it's pretty much only good for washing dishes in, and normally tastes better at the end of said process.

However, i know you folk over the water have a lot of micro-breweries that no doubt make stuff that is actually drinkable.

we have our fair share of mass produced dish water in the uk too - John Smiths and Tetley are prime examples of this for me.

But do the states have anything that could rival Marstons, Hobgoblin, Black Sheep, Bishop's Finger, Witches Brew, Belhaven, or from our nearby neighbours, the mighty Guinness?
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: typo
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: another typo, sigh


ETA: beer, ale, lager, stout, mild etc - all count for the purpose of my question
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Canadian beer that american stuff tastes like watered down horse piss



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by skalla
woooo - after the "which is better - british or american music?" thread - the Beer question came to mind, which will no doubt touch a nerve or three on both sides of the Atlantic.

I'll lay my cards on the table - i've never tried much in the way of beers from the states - Budweiser and Coors are probably the limits of my experience here... and jeez, bud even stole the name from a vastly superior and older Czech beer, and then good old bud tried to sue them to stop them using the name!

like most brits i think it's pretty much only good for washing dishes in, and normally tastes better at the end of said process.

However, i know you folk over the water have a lot of micro-breweries that no doubt make stuff that is actually drinkable.

we have our fair share of mass produced dish water in the uk too - John Smiths and Tetley are prime examples of this for me.

But do the states have anything that could rival Marstons, Hobgoblin, Black Sheep, Bishop's Finger, Witches Brew, Belhaven, or from our nearby neighbours, the mighty Guinness?
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: typo
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: another typo, sigh


It's an impossible question. Britain has a rich heritage of regional beers as I'm sure does the US. No one here will have tasted them all.

Unless you're talking about the generic advert beers, then Guinness beats all. Even though it's not a beer.
edit on 23-3-2013 by CallYourBluff because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:15 PM
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Can I vote for Canadian beer? I just did.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by freedomSlave
 

No, it's frog piss. Budweiser has to be the worst!



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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The British/American beer question is a complicated because the lines of distinction are mutually exclusive. Generally speaking Americans drink all their beers chilled, and would consider room temperature British real ale's to be too warm. Most of what Americans consider to be beer would be categorised as lagers in the UK, whereas the term beer has a much wider definition on the British Isles.

Beer in the UK includes lager, bitter, mild, stouts, and barley wine.

Malty regards.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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Neither... Australian beer is the best (I'm an American)



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:19 PM
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sweet! thanks for the quick replies folks, i felt this would get some swift responses...

however - it's all very well telling me that canadian beer is great - but tell what they are for gods sake - then i can seek them out and get all pished on your lovely brews!



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


Anything that says, "Made in Canada". MGD is my favorite. Although, the water downed version is available in the states as well.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
Neither... Australian beer is the best (I'm an American)


Are you serious?



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by skalla
woooo - after the "which is better - british or american music?" thread - the Beer question came to mind, which will no doubt touch a nerve or three on both sides of the Atlantic.

I'll lay my cards on the table - i've never tried much in the way of beers from the states - Budweiser and Coors are probably the limits of my experience here... and jeez, bud even stole the name from a vastly superior and older Czech beer, and then good old bud tried to sue them to stop them using the name!

like most brits i think it's pretty much only good for washing dishes in, and normally tastes better at the end of said process.

However, i know you folk over the water have a lot of micro-breweries that no doubt make stuff that is actually drinkable.

we have our fair share of mass produced dish water in the uk too - John Smiths and Tetley are prime examples of this for me.

But do the states have anything that could rival Marstons, Hobgoblin, Black Sheep, Bishop's Finger, Witches Brew, Belhaven, or from our nearby neighbours, the mighty Guinness?
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: typo
edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: another typo, sigh


would have to say, British beer as far as taste and alcohol content. American beer if you have a low tolerance and want to drink all day.

I spent a few years in England and after a few pints, I was more tipsy than drinking American tall drafts. The taste was amazingly better and, even though I am an avid beer drinker, could not keep up with the average European Ale drinker. After I came back, I detested the "American" beer and craved the well rounded taste of European brew. After speaking to a few local breweries, I discovered there is a HUGE difference between "beer" and "ale".

There are a few micro-breweries that come close to the perfection of hundreds of years of European breweries, but nothing is better than a pint of original Ale. It maybe the atmosphere that also adds to it or maybe the surprisingly amazing discovery, however, European Ale is amongst my most prized secrets and a welcome addition to hospitality when guest come over.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:27 PM
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I'm going with German beer.

Argentina has some surprisingly good beers too.
Then again, with the German influence in South America, that may not be so surprising after all.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

I'm going with German beer.

Argentina has some surprisingly good beers too.
Then again, with the German influence in South America, that may not be so surprising after all.



I like the way you think.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


indeed, the jerries, as well as the belgians and the french make spectacular beer - french amber beer/ bierre du garde is a real favourite of mine. it's just not as contentious


edit on 23-3-2013 by skalla because: typo - it's the belgian beer.. good old "wife beater" aka stella, ironically the mrs bought it



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Belgian.

that is all.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by Komonazmuk
Belgian.

that is all.


There is a certain Belgian beer that is known in the law enforcement business as "wife beater".



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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Good question ey... There is this Polish beer I just discovered. It's name is Tyskie Gronie. Apparently it's been at it since 1629 and I can say it's genuine quality. Taste is proper. I recommend.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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Assuming that by "beer" you mean lager, and of course we are talking about mass produced "beers", I must direct you to my homeland, The Netherlands (and Germany i guess).

American and British standard lager is neither use nor ornament. If you have to buy mass produced it has to be Heineken, Oranjeboom or Becks.

Also Peroni ain't too bad

ETA: Tesco (UK) used to do a fantastic beer called VIRU (Estonia), beautiful drink!
edit on 23/3/2013 by ThorsBrother because: ETA



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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Im gonna have to say British being biased though, but i never really found a nice tasting American beer. Budweiser is okay but for me nothing beats decent British ale or west country cider!



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 06:05 PM
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British beer is better than American Beer but Irish beer bests them both , Guinness rules the beer world and all other beers bow before it ....





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