Think the Major Banks are not worried in North America regarding Cyprus? Read and judge for yourself

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posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by Iwinder

Originally posted by Bedlam
I've gotten 10K in cash out, and it's like pulling teeth.

Worse, the cops can intercept you outside the bank and steal your money. Then you have to put up thousands in bond and hire a lawyer to get it back, if you can.

If I was packing serious cash around, I'd be way more afraid of cops than a thief, I can legally shoot a thief taking my cash, but if a cop snags it, it's just gone.


Thanks for stating what many here are thinking.
Why is cash a crime now?

Star for you
Regards, Iwinder


My guess is because cash transactions are untraceable and that in itsself is a loss of "control" for TPTB.

PEACE,
RK




posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 08:31 AM
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reply to post by anton74
 


My husband contracts at the credit union and an older couple pulled $30,000 savings out without questions and had their money in 20 minutes!



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 
RUSSIA FURIOUS OVER CYPRUS DEAL


Replying to the banking apologetics that are evident in your recent responses to my posts: please do not bother to try to explain this - there is NO explanation for it other than the fact that this is another example of the criminal banksters at work against average Americans. These same "BANKSTERS" are the ones you are trying tell us are innocent "bankers' prone to errors and accounting mistakes - AND to run cover for them portraying them in a good light.
Bank Forecloses On Elderly Woman Over $49 in Unpaid Taxes And the taxes were actually paid...

Joe Wright
Activist Post

There are some stories that are so over the top as an example of the brazen disregard for human dignity that they defy imagination. But, we know that truth is stranger than fiction . . . and this latest event is certainly proof of that.
Foreclosure fraud has become institutionalized within a corrupt banking structure; it began at the top with banks such as BoA and has trickled down into nearly every community. For example, one couple had their home in Tampa foreclosed on even after they had paid off the full amount in cash. Countless others have been victims of mortgage payment modification schemes.
However, the predatory nature of what is happening to 75-year-old Aron Ezilla Ridge in Travis County, Texas might in fact be what one news outlet is calling "The Saddest Story You Have Ever Heard." This story involves a mortgage company, but it also has a scary link to property taxes that should raise questions about the very nature of home ownership.
Back in 2010, at the peak of "Foreclosure-Gate," a few members of the banking consortium went on record to deny their responsibility for creating a system that might have given mortgage holders a raw deal:

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase, whose bank is implicated in the scandal, said this week in a conference call that there have been no accidental evictions. “We’re not evicting people who deserve to stay in their house,” the multimillionaire banker declared. “If you didn’t pay your mortgage, you shouldn’t be in your house. Period,” Walter Todd of the investment advisory firm Greenwood Capital Associates, told Reuters.
“Everyone’s responsible for following the law. If we all don’t have to pay our mortgage, should we just stop paying taxes, too?” said Anton Schutz, president of Mendon Capital Advisers. (Source)

RUSSIA FURIOUS OVER CYPRUS DEAL
edit on 25-3-2013 by POXUSA because: txt



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by POXUSA
reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 
RUSSIA FURIOUS OVER CYPRUS DEAL


Replying to the banking apologetics that are evident in your recent responses to my posts: please do not bother to try to explain this - there is NO explanation for it other than the fact that this is another example of the criminal banksters at work against average Americans. These same "BANKSTERS" are the ones you are trying tell us are innocent "bankers' prone to errors and accounting mistakes - AND to run cover for them portraying them in a good light.
Bank Forecloses On Elderly Woman Over $49 in Unpaid Taxes And the taxes were actually paid...

Joe Wright
Activist Post

There are some stories that are so over the top as an example of the brazen disregard for human dignity that they defy imagination. But, we know that truth is stranger than fiction . . . and this latest event is certainly proof of that.
Foreclosure fraud has become institutionalized within a corrupt banking structure; it began at the top with banks such as BoA and has trickled down into nearly every community. For example, one couple had their home in Tampa foreclosed on even after they had paid off the full amount in cash. Countless others have been victims of mortgage payment modification schemes.
However, the predatory nature of what is happening to 75-year-old Aron Ezilla Ridge in Travis County, Texas might in fact be what one news outlet is calling "The Saddest Story You Have Ever Heard." This story involves a mortgage company, but it also has a scary link to property taxes that should raise questions about the very nature of home ownership.
Back in 2010, at the peak of "Foreclosure-Gate," a few members of the banking consortium went on record to deny their responsibility for creating a system that might have given mortgage holders a raw deal:

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase, whose bank is implicated in the scandal, said this week in a conference call that there have been no accidental evictions. “We’re not evicting people who deserve to stay in their house,” the multimillionaire banker declared. “If you didn’t pay your mortgage, you shouldn’t be in your house. Period,” Walter Todd of the investment advisory firm Greenwood Capital Associates, told Reuters.
“Everyone’s responsible for following the law. If we all don’t have to pay our mortgage, should we just stop paying taxes, too?” said Anton Schutz, president of Mendon Capital Advisers. (Source)

RUSSIA FURIOUS OVER CYPRUS DEAL
edit on 25-3-2013 by POXUSA because: txt


According to another source, this was a mistake and the real reason for the foreclosure is because she hasn't paid homeowners insurance for years. I think this is sad and that the bank should make an exception. If this is true though, she doesn't have a leg to stand on.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by proximo
 
When it is time to withdraw lots of cash, if you need to state a purpose, maybe you should try saying something like: "I'm thinking of heading out to Vegas" (or your nearest large Casino). Next time you come in for more money, if they ask you why since you just withdrew X dollars recently, say "Well, things didn't turn out as I'd planned in Vegas but this time will be different..." then just smile pleasantly.

They might be happier believing that you are going to just lose it all than knowing you want to bury it in multiple locations around your environment.

About the fees and electronic transactions, I have a mortgage with US Bank and if i pay it electronically on the 1st it is free, if I pay it on the 2nd or later (within the 15 day grace period) they tack on a $6 convenience fee. They justify that by letting you pay it in person for free during the same period of time which actually uses more of their resources like speaking to an actual person. So yes, they want everything electonic to make fees happen in the strangest of ways.
Note: Any time I need to pay later I always put at least $6 more down as extra principal when I bring my checkbook, hoping to pay it off that much faster in a sort of protest.
edit on 25-3-2013 by evc1shop because: spelling



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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I am not typical, but I deal with large amounts of cash on an almost daily basis. I work with two banks: one for income, and one for outflow. My outflow bank gets just enough to cover my bills, and the rest is always cash.

On a typical day, I walk in and pull out 6-10 thousand dollars. The tellers all know me. We chat about my books while they scramble around to find the funds, and I walk out with the cash each and every time.

It might sound like that would make me a mark, for thieves/muggers/small-children-with-skateboards, but it doesn't. I'm always armed, visibly, and my wife always has her concealed piece on her (don't worry about me. Worry about her. She's brutally accurate with the thing)

The point to this is, there is a cash subculture to legitimate business, and the banks which matter know about it. They are ready for it, and they keep the cash on hand. My income bank gets shipments of cash just about every day. Where it becomes a problem is if you go down to your local S&L or Credit Union, where they are not ready for huge withdrawals. In those cases, they need the heads-up time to arrange for the cash to be present.

On the flip side, I save 10%-30% on my business expenses for paying cash (usually to service providers, who appreciate the ready availability of the funds). When you figure that into the equation, a $3000 withdrawal from the bank (where it would earn almost 1% interest) nets me up to $900 profit over a couple of days. That's not a particularly accurate figure, mind you... I spend money on services, parts, and upkeep, etc.; I also spend it on food and personal items, which don't normally get a cash discount.

So, the upshot to all of this is, get your money out of there. When you need to buy something--anything--ask for a cash discount. Ask for it from your doctor. Ask for it from your mechanic. Ask for it from anyone who does not normally take cash. Use cash at the pump. Use cash at the grocery store. Hell, ask your mini-mart for a discount (worst they can say is no). You will reduce your cost of living, which is equivalent to increasing your income.



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 


We own our home free and clear, the only lunatics we are worried about right now are the money people of all flavours and types.

We have various investments spread over a wide spectrum but our fist concern as of last weeks great news is to get the easiest thing first and that is our cash.

Thanks for your input and it is much appreciated that you mentioned you are a Banker.

Star for you.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by emeris
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Do the pieces of paper have more value than the digits on the screen?


Good question, In Cyprus for a case in point the digits on a a screen (ATM) and bank credit cards are worthless at this moment in time.

However cash is working just fine as it has since they closed the banks.

So for the time being yes, pieces of paper have full value whilst these digits on a screen are worthless.

Good post and much appreciated.

Regards, Iwinder
edit on 25-3-2013 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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You have no control, you are a pawn and a puppet in a game far grander and further reaching than your mind can comprehend. If you really believe what you say you believe you would pull all your money out of every bank you have money in pay off all your credit cards debts sell your house and buy a farm set it up to be as self sustaining as possible surround yourself with family and friends would do the same and create your own community that lives off the grid so that when this "eventual collapse that you think is going to happen happens, you wont be effected. Unless your doing exactly that you are pizzing in the wind and all you will get for you actions are smelly trousers. But what the hell do I know....right?
reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 

Interesting post, I will say that at least we are trying to head of potential disaster as best we can.
Unfortunately we are not privy to what the investment/bankers know as we are just humble serfs pizzing in the wind as you say.

If things do not go down hill then we can always put our money back into the banks whom really really seem to enjoy pizzing that money away than dinging us for more through supposed bailouts.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by POXUSA
reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 


Are you an economist or a banker even? I doubt it!

Nobody here is talking in relation to the entire economy collapsing. The point of removing funds from an account is so that the bankster thieves won't have access to it with respect to the criminal technique now know euphemistically, by the harmless sounding (the scum always try to make their criminal actions sound innocuous) term, as "haircutting" wherein the scum go about ILLEGALLY shaving 10, 15, 20 % right off the top of the customers hard earned savings and or checking accts.. It could very well happen here and the entire point of the thread is that, in light of bankster Bernanke's recent ambiguous statements on the matter, it probably will.

I am in the process of removing all of my savings out - to be placed in a safe place under my personal protection. If the scum bankers still want the money by means of confiscation - another likely possibility btw - then it'll be over my dead body and a few of their dead bodies as well!!!

Just in: Drudge - CYPRUS VOTES TO SEIZE CITIZENS' CASH - 40% off the top

AND HERE: Jones - Cyprus bank bailout agreement is pure theft: 40% of private deposits to be looted from selected accounts
edit on 25-3-2013 by POXUSA because: txt


Great post and many thanks for saying what a lot of us are thinking.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 





As a matter of fact I AM a banker. I think most people that visit this site have absolutely no concept of the banking sector. All they know is what they think they know. Also Not all banks are the same. And to group them all into one lump is ridiculously ignorant.

First off how can us peons have a concept of the banking sector when they are so secretive about how they spend and gamble our money? How they receive bailouts and won't discuss the terms or the amounts?





What the hell are you going to do with 10k of Canadian dollars if its not worth anything? What part of this logic dont you understand? Unless you convert Fiat currency into goods of value in a SHTF scenario which is what you think might happen in order for the banks to do what they tried to do in Cyprus.


I can tell you that 10k of Cyprus money right now and for the last ten days would be invaluable to any individual in that Country.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by POXUSA
reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 


Originally posted by TiM3LoRd
I think most people that visit this site have absolutely no concept of the banking sector. All they know is what they think they know.

I have a very good idea of the shady underhanded operations of the BANKSTERS!!!

edit on 25-3-2013 by POXUSA because: txt


I think we all do here on ATS and it is a world wide awareness, I mean Gosh how long has it been? Years and years since we have NOT read about some banking scandal on a daily basis? And I might add we are not talking thousands in any currency but the new hip word is Billions at a time.

Regards, Iwinder
edit on 25-3-2013 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 





Look, the banks are no angels they are in it to make a profit but they usually do it in a manner that's sustainable.......USUALLY. But like I said some fools get greedy and try to make money fast and make a mess of things and then they have to send in the clean up crew. Hey dont believe me read the article you posted, it says this is all been set in place to prevent a Eurozone exit which would have catastrophic effects on the EU and the Euro which is what everybody seems to think they are trying to do.


Well that is refreshing to see a banker at least admit things are not as honest as they would like us to believe.

Star for that
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by POXUSA

Originally posted by TiM3LoRd
... ... ... I just think you guys over thinking this and not taking into account the fact that these people make mistakes just like anybody else.


I'm merely stating the facts as I see them reported in the worldwide press. So, please consider these post/links as warnings - harbingers of things to come. Protect yourselves from the banksters - not to be confused with small town everyday run of the mill 'bankers.'

Soon coming to a small town (bank) near you - possibly your own!

Europe: €100,000 Savings Now Considered “Wealthy”
Another great post, you are on the ball and I hope all here read your post with the links included.

many thanks for that information.
Regards, Iwinder
BTW I have more than 100 G's in a CU, and I certainly do not consider myself "wealthy" by any stretch of the imagination.

Words Of Warning: Get Your Money Out Of European Banks

IT’S OFFICIAL: Banks In Europe May Now Seize Deposits To Cover Their Gambling Losses
edit on 25-3-2013 by POXUSA because: txt



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by Rigel Kent

Originally posted by Iwinder

Originally posted by Bedlam
I've gotten 10K in cash out, and it's like pulling teeth.

Worse, the cops can intercept you outside the bank and steal your money. Then you have to put up thousands in bond and hire a lawyer to get it back, if you can.

If I was packing serious cash around, I'd be way more afraid of cops than a thief, I can legally shoot a thief taking my cash, but if a cop snags it, it's just gone.


Thanks for stating what many here are thinking.
Why is cash a crime now?

Star for you
Regards, Iwinder


My guess is because cash transactions are untraceable and that in itsself is a loss of "control" for TPTB.

PEACE,
RK


My guess is that your guess is spot on the money.....pardon the pun :-)

Thanks for chiming in here.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by Starwise
reply to post by anton74
 


My husband contracts at the credit union and an older couple pulled $30,000 savings out without questions and had their money in 20 minutes!


Good stuff to know, we really are leaning to that direction. Thanks for your input here on this thread.
I don't recall reading about any Credit Unions in our area being in trouble nor doing anything stupid like the banks have been doing for years now.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by evc1shop
reply to post by proximo
 
When it is time to withdraw lots of cash, if you need to state a purpose, maybe you should try saying something like: "I'm thinking of heading out to Vegas" (or your nearest large Casino). Next time you come in for more money, if they ask you why since you just withdrew X dollars recently, say "Well, things didn't turn out as I'd planned in Vegas but this time will be different..." then just smile pleasantly.

They might be happier believing that you are going to just lose it all than knowing you want to bury it in multiple locations around your environment.

About the fees and electronic transactions, I have a mortgage with US Bank and if i pay it electronically on the 1st it is free, if I pay it on the 2nd or later (within the 15 day grace period) they tack on a $6 convenience fee. They justify that by letting you pay it in person for free during the same period of time which actually uses more of their resources like speaking to an actual person. So yes, they want everything electonic to make fees happen in the strangest of ways.
Note: Any time I need to pay later I always put at least $6 more down as extra principal when I bring my checkbook, hoping to pay it off that much faster in a sort of protest.
edit on 25-3-2013 by evc1shop because: spelling


Yes same here to avoid service fees for this that and the other things we must have a balance of 5k in our account.

If we do not maintain that balance we will incur as of today $40.05 a month in fees......that by my math is just short of $500.00 a year.

It sure would not take long to have a zero balance, but the problem is we need that account to write checks/atm/debit/pay bills.....etc etc all have fees no mater you have an account there or not.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by herrw
I am not typical, but I deal with large amounts of cash on an almost daily basis. I work with two banks: one for income, and one for outflow. My outflow bank gets just enough to cover my bills, and the rest is always cash.

On a typical day, I walk in and pull out 6-10 thousand dollars. The tellers all know me. We chat about my books while they scramble around to find the funds, and I walk out with the cash each and every time.

It might sound like that would make me a mark, for thieves/muggers/small-children-with-skateboards, but it doesn't. I'm always armed, visibly, and my wife always has her concealed piece on her (don't worry about me. Worry about her. She's brutally accurate with the thing)

The point to this is, there is a cash subculture to legitimate business, and the banks which matter know about it. They are ready for it, and they keep the cash on hand. My income bank gets shipments of cash just about every day. Where it becomes a problem is if you go down to your local S&L or Credit Union, where they are not ready for huge withdrawals. In those cases, they need the heads-up time to arrange for the cash to be present.

On the flip side, I save 10%-30% on my business expenses for paying cash (usually to service providers, who appreciate the ready availability of the funds). When you figure that into the equation, a $3000 withdrawal from the bank (where it would earn almost 1% interest) nets me up to $900 profit over a couple of days. That's not a particularly accurate figure, mind you... I spend money on services, parts, and upkeep, etc.; I also spend it on food and personal items, which don't normally get a cash discount.

So, the upshot to all of this is, get your money out of there. When you need to buy something--anything--ask for a cash discount. Ask for it from your doctor. Ask for it from your mechanic. Ask for it from anyone who does not normally take cash. Use cash at the pump. Use cash at the grocery store. Hell, ask your mini-mart for a discount (worst they can say is no). You will reduce your cost of living, which is equivalent to increasing your income.


Awesome post and I cannot add anything here but my very sincere thanks for posting that.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:26 PM
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Apologies to all here for my many posts in a row but this thread is getting a lot of interest from over seas so when I have time during the day there are many posts to reply to from the night before.

Thanks to everyone who has posted here or just lurked and learned.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 25 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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The banks warning that she could be mugged on the way home was not probably not for no reason. Perhaps they did get sued at one time, if someone saw a person receive the money in the bank and followed them home. Perhaps the person then blamed the bank for not keeping it secret enough. People are very litigious these days. And there are people who are so desperate for money that they could have very well followed your wife from the bank.
reply to post by BlueAjah
 

Good point and much appreciated, I wonder why if they were so worried about my wife's safety why not do the transaction in one of the many offices available out of eye sight?

I mean with the waiver and all they sure must be concerned?

Nope they do it at a teller in eye sight and ear shot of everybody in the bank lobby.

Care and concern it was not.

Thanks for your thought provoking posts on this thread.

Regards, Iwinder





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