Neanderthal genome published by German scientists

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posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 09:24 AM
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The genome of our neanderthal cousins (in my case, a nephew) has been published this week by a group of german scientists. The Huffington Post and several other sources report on this advance in mapping the DNA of the great ape species (and yes, we are great apes too, and you redheads know it!)

www.huffingtonpost.com...


Researchers in Germany said Tuesday they have completed the first high-quality sequencing of a Neanderthal genome and are making it freely available online for other scientists to study.

The genome produced from remains of a toe bone found in a Siberian cave is far more detailed than a previous "draft" Neanderthal genome sequenced three years ago by the same team at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

"The genome of a Neanderthal is now there in a form as accurate as that of any person walking the streets today," Svante Paabo, a geneticist who led the research, told The Associated Press in an email.


edit on 23-3-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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Are these the same creepy researchers that want to knock up a volunteer with a neanderthal baby?



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by Xaphan
 


I wish I could.

I asked my wife to volunteer. She just said no and said I didnt deserve a reason.

Oh´ the things I would do with a Vagina and ovaries...lol

I wish I was a woman to volunteer....I would in a heart beat.

As a father, I would love to have the chance to raise a neanderthal. I think he would feel right at home under my roof.

edit on 23-3-2013 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Very cool news.

S+F!



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by Xaphan
Are these the same creepy researchers that want to knock up a volunteer with a neanderthal baby?


I don't know, but I doubt it, these guys seem pretty respectable. Please add the baby thread in a post.

Here's a list I posted on another thread, and it's pretty comprehnsive summary of ATS's neanderthal collection. Please add to it if I've missed any.

Here's a short one www.abovetopsecret.com...

And here's a longer one www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 23-3-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)


And a longer one www.abovetopsecret.com...

And then one that's realllly long, about Man's genetic voyage and starring...neanderthals!

www.abovetopsecret.com...

And here's a really old one, from back in the age just after neanderthals walked the earth, 2007 www.abovetopsecret.com...

Then there's the fact that Bigfoot is a neanderthal, with some good neanderthal data ("Get out of my cereal cupboard, Bigfoot!") www.abovetopsecret.com...

And for you fans of wikipedia, the professors there have agreed to let me link this neanderthal page en.wikipedia.org... as well as this on, to a German museum in Mettman all about the cute critters en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 23-3-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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If its from Denisova cave, then its not Neanderthal bone.



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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Originally posted by DangerDeath
If its from Denisova cave, then its not Neanderthal bone.


That's interesting, can you give more detail? Thanks. I don't think the article says (I ran into one of those floating ads on the Huffington Post site and it was too irritating to stay.

I managed to catch more of the article though, and the article makes it sound like these guys are legit and know what they're talking about. But they will not publish a paper for quite awhile yet, although they are releasing the the genome to all researchers.


"We will gain insights into many aspects of the history of both Neanderthals and Denisovans, and refine our knowledge about the genetic changes that occurred in the genomes of modern humans after they parted ways with the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans," Paabo said.

Klein said the comparisons might allow scientists to determine what makes our species unique and explain why we survive and others didn't.

Paabo's group plans to publish a scientific paper later this year.

In the meantime, the genome sequence is being made freely available so scientists elsewhere can conduct research on it, he said.


edit on 23-3-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


en.wikipedia.org...

This article doesn't seem very accurate. There are other threads here on ATS about Neanderthals, with lots of information. Neanderthals did not live in Siberia. They reached as far as Caucasus mountains and Caspian sea, but not further than that.

Another thread: www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by Aleister
The genome of our neanderthal cousins (in my case, a nephew)


bravo, sir!

thanks for posting too


reply to post by DangerDeath
 


i'm no expert on neanderthals and am still digesting the thread here on the fossil record, but while researching some slightly related stuff in the last couple of days i came across a few mentions of neanderthals beyond the limits that you mention, there is a link here but it's from 2007 though so subsequent work may superceed this and perhaps they were proven to be denisovians

www.newscientist.com...

Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues examined skeletal remains found in the Okladnikov cave in the Altai Mountains and dated as between 30,000 and 38,000 years old . Until now, archaeologists have been unable to determine whether the remains belonged to Neanderthals or another species of extinct hominid because the bones are too fragmented.

Pääbo and his colleagues took 200 milligram samples of bone from the adolescent. After dissolving the mineral component of the bone, the team succeeded in extracting DNA from mitochondria - parts of the cell that produce energy.

Near-perfect match
After sequencing a short fragment of this DNA, the team compared it with that of several Neanderthals found in Europe. They discovered that it matched DNA recovered from remains found in Belgium almost perfectly. The match was "quite a bit of a surprise", according to Pääbo, since the new evidence extends the territory of this hominid some 2000 kilometres further east



posted on Mar, 23 2013 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by DangerDeath
If its from Denisova cave, then its not Neanderthal bone.

The find is from denisova cave,

Here is a link to paper,
www.eva.mpg.de...

The genome sequence was generated from a toe bone discovered in Denisova Cave in southern Siberia in 2010. The bone is described in Mednikova (Ethnology & Anthropology of Eurasia 2011. 39: 129-138).

DNA sequences were generated on the Illumina HiSeq platform and constitute an average 50-fold coverage of the genome. 99.9% of the 1.7GB of uniquely mappable DNA sequences in the human genome are covered at least ten times. Contamination with modern human DNA, estimated from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, is around 1%.

The figure shows a tree relating this genome to the genomes of Neandertals from Croatia, from Germany and from the Caucasus as well as the Denisovan genome recovered from a finger bone excavated at Deniosva Cave. It shows that this individual is closely related to these other Neandertals. Thus, both Neandertals and Denisovans have inhabited this cave in southern Siberia, presumably at different times.


And from John Hawks blog on it,

Today, Svante Pääbo's group at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology released high-coverage sequence data from a toe bone from Denisova Cave. The new genome comes a year after the same group released the high-coverage genome of the Denisova finger bone, several months before they published the first high-coverage analysis of this ancient genome [1]. Today's announcement is here: "A high-quality Neandertal genome sequence". It adds a second high-coverage genome from Denisova Cave, this one from a toe bone. Unlike the first finger bone genome,this toe has produced a genome very much like Neandertal specimens from much further west, including the Vindija Neandertals. Something interesting in these data: the presence of a Y chromosome.



posted on Mar, 24 2013 @ 05:23 AM
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reply to post by skalla
 

Thanks. The surprise here from some posters is that neanderthals could be found so far east. I don't see the logistic problem in that, all some of them had to do was walk across land. A sojourn, a walkabout, and a trip down lover's lane. Some people (and I count neanderthals as people) have the wandering gene, they must explore and keep on moving, especially when young (probably to mix genes with others but far away from their own gene pool). And lots of them likely wandered east, and then their children kept going east, and suddenly everyone's Siberian.





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