Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible

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posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:36 AM
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The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

io9.com...

While I won't go too much into the regional connection to Cubic Corp that this article suggests via the UC San Diego reference (Think TrapWire and if you can't get that far than ask before denouncing) this is pretty much the latest in admitted technology with regards to 'synthetic telepahy'. I think this is one of the more relevant articles in that the technology is very miniscule.



While the focus of the site has kind of moved towards more mainstream issues in recent years I think that this article highlights a very relevant mind control conspiracy that doesn't really get much consideration. The very specific miniscule design of the 'delivery system' also tends to lend credence to the idea of people complaining of electronic harassment. I think that there might be a relevancy to opening up a discourse on this topic...




posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
... this is pretty much the latest in admitted technology with regards to 'synthetic telepahy'. I think this is one of the more relevant articles in that the technology is very miniscule.


Why would this have any bearing on "synthetic telepathy", whatever that might be?

Also, it's not particularly miniscule.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


Right on! I am amazed at how prosthetic arms now have little tiny nerve attachments that just send a pulse, but the brain can configure itself to interpret that stimulus as say, something touching the elbow. Another pulse on a nerve right next door can correspond to something touching the palm, and so on. They are even at the point where they scale the pulse and the brain wires itself to accept that to indicate how much pressure the hand is squeezing.

It seems completely logical that this could be used for communication too. Just look at Stephen Hawkings' speech computer. He communicates using subtle movements with his eyebrow and other facial expressions. And you cannot forget about Moore's law, this stuff will only get smaller, faster, and cheaper.

Fascinating times.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 02:02 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
Why would this have any bearing on "synthetic telepathy", whatever that might be?

Also, it's not particularly miniscule.


Missed ya, Bedlam...


This tech is based on subvocalization (in my estimation) and the PNS stimulations thereof...if to a computer than to a computer monitored by a human. It's not perfect telepathy but then again I didn't assert beyond the article...

Miniscule...it's a term. Meant to differentiate from the rice grain sized rfid implants that get passed around.

By the way...I think I might have traced the origin of tinfoil stigma much like you surprised me with the 'first schizophrenic'...gramaphone tech back in the day. Not to say that it is proof but some of the original audio recordings and expression required tinfoil...
edit on Thu, 21 Mar 2013 02:03:16 -0500 by MemoryShock because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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edit on Thu, 21 Mar 2013 02:39:44 -0500 by MemoryShock because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock

This tech is based on subvocalization (in my estimation) and the PNS stimulations thereof...if to a computer than to a computer monitored by a human. It's not perfect telepathy but then again I didn't assert beyond the article...


Um, well, that's already around. Has been a few years.

JSOC funded development on that a while back, not sure if it's fieldable yet.





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