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Too Much Tea Causes Unusual Bone Disease

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posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 08:29 AM
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All these studies change everyday. One day it is good and its bad the next. I never pay attention to most of them. Many of them are valid and make a point but rule of thumb is moderation. Too much of anything is damaging including money and power in addition to particular food/beverage




posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 08:41 AM
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eating more foods containing molybdenum can help strengthen teeth. Liming the soil can make molybdenum that is bound in the soils available and it boosts plant size too. Too much lime is no good though, it can deplete the minerals and make them unavailable in the future, burning out the soil. The best sources sometimes can cause problems if overeaten, such as broccoli and calliflower. They can lower energy levels in the body. Boiling them well helps because the chemistry falls apart with heat but some of these minerals go into the water. This water is good for plants, it can make some of them grow better.

Watch not to eat too many phytates and phytic acid also, it reduces the minerals absorbtion and can add to bone loss. Even though Wheat Germ is high in Molybdenum, it is bound by this chemistry. Roasted nuts are good, the heat of roasting breaks down the phytic acid. Raw or undercooked nuts and seeds are bound

Watch that too much Molybdenum is not supplemented in pills because it can chealate out a lot of good minerals like copper and zinc. Moderation is the clue.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 08:42 AM
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she drank a pitcher of tea made from at least 100 tea bags daily, for 17 years, researchers report.




by the sounds of it she probably chopped herself a huge line of the stuff and banged it up her nose every morning too.
i stll think that coffee is evil, and tea be the water of life - i'm gonna put the kettle on right now, by jove!



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 08:54 AM
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If that was the case 90% of the UK would have the disease. Which would not make it very 'unusual' now, would it?




 
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posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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My question is how is someone supposed to know if their tea has fluoride in it? I mean at least with water you can either see the labeling or check with your city (luckily we only have chlorine and other harmful chemicals
) but how about tea? I've never seen a teabag with that on it?

I buy all my teas in leaf form (valerian, hibiscus,lavender,green, black etc) but are they still processed with fluoride as well?



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by RooskiZombi
My question is how is someone supposed to know if their tea has fluoride in it? I mean at least with water you can either see the labeling or check with your city (luckily we only have chlorine and other harmful chemicals
) but how about tea? I've never seen a teabag with that on it?

I buy all my teas in leaf form (valerian, hibiscus,lavender,green, black etc) but are they still processed with fluoride as well?


It's not a matter of processing, the plant they make tea from LIKES fluoride, and will pick up any from the ground it can get its little roots on. That moves into the leaves, and Bob's your uncle.

Green tea has a lot of fluoride, comparatively. Black tea's your best bet.

eta: it likes aluminum, too.
edit on 21-3-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by RooskiZombi
 


The fluoride naturally accumulates in the leaf. It's a different compound from the fluoride in water, and much easier on the body. I wouldn't worry as long as you don't drink more than a liter or two with a regular dose of leaf to it per day.

I drink about a liter and a half a day. Have been for many years, and have no health problems from it.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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There is high amounts of fluoride in some teas, including green tea, black tea, ice teas and powdered ice tea mixes like Lipton. I recently started drinking Rooibos tea (which isn't a leaf tea at all, even) and discovered it's also high in fluoride content. Just do a search for fluoride in tea and you'll find a lot of information about it. Herbal teas are supposedly safe, so that's what I try and stick to, with the occasional cup of Rooibos (yum!). Brewing tea in fluoridated water isn't the best idea either.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by CommanderCraCra
 


Thanks for the info. Wow I was under the impression fluoride was a man-made but I guess not! Glad it's not as harmful on the body though, phew! I love me a brewed drink



posted on May, 3 2013 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


Didn't you know that tea itself contains fluoride in natural form? Whether organic or not, it is there, so avid tea drinkers had better watch out! I also dislike the astringency - makes one's lips pucker as when you eat a tart apple!

More info here:
www.poisonfluoride.com






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