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Cyprus crisis deepens: Bailout rejected, BANKS MAY NOT REOPEN!!!

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posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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New US territory anyone? The US should come in and rescue Cyprus. Sure we are broke but the government can print all the money it wants over here on this side of the Atlantic. 10-20 billion? That's peanuts.

They can set them up nice like Puerto Rico, a commonwealth US territory. The US can even build a nice new Naval base. Why turn to Russia or China, the good old USA can print them all the money they need.




posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by WhiteAlice
After reading this thread, I'm really surprised that I don't recall seeing a single person on this thread understanding what Cyprus and its banks actually are--an offshore tax haven.


I'm surprised that you don't understand that almost *every single country in the world* is an "offshore tax haven" to *somebody*.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00

Originally posted by WhiteAlice
After reading this thread, I'm really surprised that I don't recall seeing a single person on this thread understanding what Cyprus and its banks actually are--an offshore tax haven.


I'm surprised that you don't understand that almost *every single country in the world* is an "offshore tax haven" to *somebody*.


Not necessarily. I don't think that countries with higher tax rates are necessarily tax havens to anyone. That said, here in the US, we do have what is called the foreign tax credit (corporate and individual both have this) so technically, any country in the world could be considered an "offshore tax haven" as you said. It all depends on what kind of tax law and rates those countries have. Or even states. The reason why some areas have more corporate HQs than others is frequently based on the state tax rates so, in a sense, you're right if you are using a very loose definition of what constitutes a tax haven. Here is what the US Government Accountability Office uses to define what is a probable tax haven of the more extreme tax avoidance type: www.gao.gov...

Like Cyprus.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by angelchemuel
reply to post by Senduko
 


Nope sorry, disagree. From last Saturday, all news everywhere was that ATM's were on lockdown too. From what I have read/seen, this limited access has only been enabled today by one Cypriot bank, not accross the board. But hey, it doesn't matter really...the weekend will tell.
Rainbows
Jane



Every report, photo and video that I have seen since Saturday has clearly stated that while the banks were closed, the ATMs have been available for limited withdrawals.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by WhiteAlice
It all depends on what kind of tax law and rates those countries have.


Or the accountant/lawyers you have for your shell company in those countries.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00

Originally posted by WhiteAlice
It all depends on what kind of tax law and rates those countries have.


Or the accountant/lawyers you have for your shell company in those countries.


lol aye...I know of an international company that had a tax id for Tunisia that they were using for US taxes for quite a long while. Then one day, they realized that they didn't actually have a shell company in Tunisia set up. They sent their CFO to Tunisia asap to set up that business before the actual lack of it was detected by the IRS. Kind of a funny (in some ways) and true story that I heard from one of their employees that is perfect for your point on shell companies.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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So here's a question for everyone. Do you think law enforcement/soldiers of any of these countries taking a haircut have to pay out of their savings? Surely the governments would have to keep them on side?



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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It is interesting that while the common citizen who lives in Cypress have access to their savings, although in small amounts, the people who use it as a tax haven are completely cut off.

Something tells me that the bulk of the wealth in those banks belong to wealthy people who are trying to cheat their own government from the taxes that will eventually lead their own government to the same economic turmoil.

Sad really, shame people do not realize the larger picture, and consequences of their actions.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by nw15062
It is interesting that while the common citizen who lives in Cypress have access to their savings, although in small amounts, the people who use it as a tax haven are completely cut off.

Something tells me that the bulk of the wealth in those banks belong to wealthy people who are trying to cheat their own government from the taxes that will eventually lead their own government to the same economic turmoil.

Sad really, shame people do not realize the larger picture, and consequences of their actions.


That's what I see as well especially after looking at people in Cyprus lining up at atms. If Cyprus is being used as an offshore tax haven for Russian individuals and businesses, I would find it very interesting if Russia intervened on this because, although I know nothing of Russian tax, it would be their tax evaders really that they'd be saving.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by MrFuzzy
 





So here's a question for everyone. Do you think law enforcement/soldiers of any of these countries taking a haircut have to pay out of their savings? Surely the governments would have to keep them on side?


I don't know about the military or law enforcement, but I can bet Government officials, bank accounts are exempt, they probably already have it written into the laws,something about not seizing their assets for the good of the nation, or something.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:14 PM
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Originally posted by Painterz
What's with all the German hatred? The Cypriot banks have run their affairs so badly that they've all gone bankrupt and lost all of their depositors money.

To stop themselves from going out of business they need a bail out.


I certainly do NOT hate Germans. Not all people who subscribe to the Nazi agenda were/are German. The Nazis had/have many non-German supporters throughout Europe, especially among the aristocrats.

See "Rise of the Fourth Reich" by Jim Marrs.

From what I understand, the problem with some major Cypriot banks is that they invested in Greek bonds that collapsed in value as junk bonds. They lost over 3 billion Euros.

Cyprus has a huge financial sector. Russians have stashed over 30 billion in Cypriots banks, and that's what the EU banksters want to get their "cut" of. Of course, the Russians are outraged. Whether this is Russian mob money is really irrelevant, no civilized bank would raid deposits.


And the German people have said you know what? We don't want to hand over our taxpayers money to bail out failed banks in a country that is not even ours and provide hand-outs to foreign citizens.

What's wrong with that? I wouldn't want my tax money going straight into the pockets of Cypriot savers.


No argument there. The Germans have there own problems. They're running about a 3% annual deficit themselves. Plus being tapped to bail out other EU countries.


Sad truth is the Cypriot banks are bankrupt, they've lost so much money their government can't afford to bail them out, so the poor old Cypriot in the streets is probably going to lose everything. Much more than the 7-10% they are going to lose at the moment.


It will be interesting to see how this plays out.


Can't really blame the Germans for this.


I'm not blaming the Germans for the financial mess of Greece & Cyprus. I blame "International Nazis" who (I believe) play a large part in shaping the agenda of the cabal that runs this world.

There are Greeks who never forgave the Germans for their occupation of Greece during WWII. But then again there are Greeks who never forgave the Turks -- and how long ago was that?



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by Senduko
reply to post by AGR1PPA
 


Indeed, it has me somewhat startled aswell, I mean Cyprus is like the medium to attack Russia. Attack might be a big word, but it's like you said, They want this bankrun.

They knew the tax would be a redflag, then they opted to close the banks causing even more unrest, now they even said the banks might not even re-open.

Its like that Cypriot said on an interview, We don't want to choose for Russia, but russia has always been there for us. They are driving us to the Russians. Odd to say the least, Or maybe they are trying to get a foothold in the Russian Empire? Cyprus being the horse of Troy?

Well I wouldn't be surprised if the coming weeks will bring some answers.


Things will get really interesting if the Cypriots are bailed out by the Russians.

If Assad falls, the Russians will probably lose their Med port in Syria. A new Russian naval base in Cyprus? And the Russians & Turks are not the best of friends either. (The northern third of Cyprus is occupied by Turkish Cypriots.)

Plus there are natural gas deposits offshore. Not to mention that Cyprus has a profitable tourist trade. A nice place to hide from Russian winters. Hmmm. I don't think the EU banksters would like this at all.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by drphilxr
reply to post by Senduko
 


Schlact, Borman, Skorzeny...even the grey wolf himself...

They setup the multinationals with the help of the Dulles Brothers to propagate

a fourth reich legacy since the 30's, up until...now!

A much, much better way to win a war that was lost - but whose losers never

formally surrendered to the Allies - was to shuffle the reichbanks vast stolen fortune

into multinational corporations and buy governments to create a new world order.

The EU.

Crazy enough that it might be true. At least it would make for a good Timothy Farrell book!


Of course, I don't think this is crazy at all. Read "Rise of the Fourth Reich" by Jim Marrs -- the extensive research he did is far too complicated for a thread here.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by wemadetheworld
Coincidentally I was thinking yesterday about something Einstein said: "I know not with what weapons World War 3 will be fought, but World War 4 will be fought with sticks and stones."

He was refuting the idea that World War 3 would certainly be a nuclear war. As yourself and the Cypriot lady have asserted, perhaps this 'financial crisis' is actually World War 3


Originally posted by stargatetravels
As a lovely, elderly Cypriot lady said on the news yesterday, this is Germany waging another war.
World War 3 has started and it's a financial war.


Certainly, it's not off-base to call the worldwide financial crisis a type of war on the common man.

But I think there will be a real WWIII, using all kinds of WMD's, including nukes. The world depopulation agenda is real: war not only thins out the herd, but the chaos of war provides a cover for all kinds of nefarious actions.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by EarthCitizen07

Originally posted by walliswallis

You can't close the bank down entirely!


uh, yes you can


Technically the government could, but that would only worsten the situation once the banks fully open.

The whole idea is to ease tensions and maintain some confidence in the banking system.

If banks close totally they might as well declare martial law, which I am not sure what that would do anyway.

Sooner or later russia and china need to step in and save cyprus since cyprus declined EU help.



You are in complete denial, the banks are insolvent, almost every government is drowning in debt. There comes a point when the bailouts will stop because everyone has figured out it they don't work. How many failed bailouts do you really think it is going to take before even the dumbest person realizes they are not doing anything other than flushing more money down the toilet. The math has been clear that bailouts are idiotic for years, they have only been done to keep peoples confidence up, but if that no longer works ....

I think we may have finally reached that point, but if not, it won't be much longer.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by Xaphan

Originally posted by NeoVain
That´s what they have done for hundreds of years, their tactics are tought down the generations, and it´s all they know how to do. They won´t change their ways since it has served them VERY WELL INDEED. They are just following their "grand plan".

You are forgetting about Rothschild however, that family makes Bill Gates look like a beggar.

Incidentally, their are also all jews...

I've always found it amazing how people can make some very good points, but all it takes it one sentence to completely destroy any credibility that was built.

Originally posted by NeoVain
Incidentally, their are also all jews...


Of course, they're NOT ALL Jews. Many suspect that the "inner court" of the cabal that rules this world are European NON-Jewish aristocrats.

Do the Rothschilds have a starring role in this? Yes, but so do a number powerful non-Jews.

I've posted again & again, that this has NOTHING to do with the average Jew.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 
There are no money in the banks, the Russian mob and all Russian billionaires, just take bags of cash from banks, so ...... of course no more reason to open




posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by walliswallis

Originally posted by lucid eyes
When half a decade ago Cyprus voted a Communist Government everyone rejoiced over the "peoples revolution" and the creation of an egalitarian utopia. Back then I looked at the celebrations on TV and said: "They`ll be broke within 5 years". This is just the latest in a neverending string of socialist failure. And people are still peddling the merits of leftism everywhere you look.


The issue with Cyprus was that the private banks were over-invested in Greece. It may be a socialist failure, but it's a Greek socialist failure. In Cyprus it's a capitalist failure. IOW, both sides worked together on this one.


You can't blame the bad judgment of the Cypriot bankers that bought up Greek bonds on Capitalism.
You can blame it on their bad judgment.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by angelchemuel

Originally posted by lucid eyes
When half a decade ago Cyprus voted a Communist Government everyone rejoiced over the "peoples revolution" and the creation of an egalitarian utopia. Back then I looked at the celebrations on TV and said: "They`ll be broke within 5 years". This is just the latest in a neverending string of socialist failure. And people are still peddling the merits of leftism everywhere you look.


And Capitalism is??? They are the same side of the coin at he end of the day.
A communist government???
Rainbows
Jane


Capitalism is NOT the same side of the coin as Communism. Communism & Fascism may be evil twins, but Capitalism is at the opposite end of the spectrum.

All forms of socialism (Communism & Fascism) value the Collective or State over the Individual.

It is Capitalism that says the right to own private property is the foundation of all other INDIVIDUAL human rights.
Capitalism recognizes the value of the individual and that the individual has certain inalienable rights.
An individual has the right to keep what he has created.

The US hasn't seen real Capitalism in a long time. Now the Gov has the right to confiscate what it wants.
If you're the one who owns the Gov then this works out for you.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by nw15062
It is interesting that while the common citizen who lives in Cypress have access to their savings, although in small amounts, the people who use it as a tax haven are completely cut off.

Something tells me that the bulk of the wealth in those banks belong to wealthy people who are trying to cheat their own government from the taxes that will eventually lead their own government to the same economic turmoil.

Sad really, shame people do not realize the larger picture, and consequences of their actions.


Considering that some of these foreign depositors are criminals and are probably narcissistic sociopaths, I don't think it's surprising that they don't care what happens to other people, including their countrymen.





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