Mini Black Holes Easier To Make Than Thought

page: 1
5

log in

join

posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 04:39 PM
link   
Creating microscopic black holes using particle accelerators requires less energy than previously thought, researchers say. If physicists do succeed in creating black holes with such energies on Earth, the achievement could prove the existence of extra dimensions in the universe, physicists noted. Any such black holes would pose no risk to Earth, however, scientists added. Black holes possess gravitational fields so powerful that nothing can escape, not even light. The holes normally form when the remains of a dead star collapse under their own gravity, squeezing their mass together.

A number of theories about the universe suggest the existence of extra dimensions ofreality , each folded up into sizes ranging from as tiny as a proton to as big as a fraction of a millimeter. At distances comparable to the sizes of these extra dimensions, these models suggest gravity may become far stronger than normal. As such, atom smashers could cram enough energy together to generate black holes. Source - www.livescience.com...




posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 04:53 PM
link   
S+F for this little tidbit.


I have been reading up on the possibilities of interstellar travel, and the physics required.

I have a feeling that the ability to produce black holes on the microscopic scale with turn out to be a huge boon to physics, science, space travel, and the human race in general. Excuse me while I have me a nerdgasm.



posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   

Even if one assumes Hawking is wrong and that black holes are more stable than that, the tiny black holes would pose no danger. Because the microscopic black holes would be created within a particle accelerator, they should keep enough speed to escape from Earth's gravity. Moreover, if any get trapped, they are so tiny it would take each one more than the current age of the universe to destroy even a milligram of Earth matter

Got to say that bit seems quite reassuring


Still, conventional physics suggest it would take a quadrillion, or a million-billion, times more energy to form a microscopic black hole than the Large Hadron Collider is capable of, so even a third of that is beyond human reach

Ahhhh not this week then.

S+F'd for an interesting read though, good find.
edit on 18-3-2013 by Hopeforeveryone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 05:10 PM
link   
reply to post by Trackhunter
 


If this is true, the days of waste disposal companies are numbered!






posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 05:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Trackhunter
Creating microscopic black holes using particle accelerators requires less energy than previously thought, researchers say. If physicists do succeed in creating black holes with such energies on Earth, the achievement could prove the existence of extra dimensions in the universe, physicists noted. Any such black holes would pose no risk to Earth, however, scientists added. Black holes possess gravitational fields so powerful that nothing can escape, not even light. The holes normally form when the remains of a dead star collapse under their own gravity, squeezing their mass together.

A number of theories about the universe suggest the existence of extra dimensions ofreality , each folded up into sizes ranging from as tiny as a proton to as big as a fraction of a millimeter. At distances comparable to the sizes of these extra dimensions, these models suggest gravity may become far stronger than normal. As such, atom smashers could cram enough energy together to generate black holes. Source - www.livescience.com...


Using the most powerful particle accelerator at CERN we have not seen any miniature blackholes so I think those theories that support them are grasping at straws imo


If this form of the theory were right, the LHC should have been able to produce small black holes that would instantly decay (and not, as some had feared, devour the Earth). But a look at the data obtained by CMS shows that a signature of the black holes’ decay is notably absent.

source
edit on 18-3-2013 by minor007 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 05:47 AM
link   
hmmm reminds me of John Titors time machine





new topics

top topics
 
5

log in

join