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Radioactive Solar Blast To Hit Earth

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posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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RADIOACTIVE SOLAR BLAST TO HIT EARTH


mobile.wnd.com

A burst of radioactive solar particles has erupted from the Sun, streaking toward Earth at 900 miles per second, NASA has announced.
Read more at mobile.wnd.com...
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 17-3-2013 by Rising Against because: Removed all caps title.




posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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We should be in the Middle of it tomorrow, although some of the blast should be hittin us today. Earth is 93 mil miles from the sun, blast moving at 900 miles per second, about 26.7 hours minus time since the blast.

I'm thinking around noon Pacific, US west coast time.

mobile.wnd.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 17-3-2013 by poet1b because: Remove first paragraph, from wrong link.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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The plots are already topped off, on the Satellite Environment Plot (Courtesy: NOAA)
www.sec.noaa.gov...

Yet starting to wane. Is there to be a greater even than the one currently underway?



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:37 PM
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So how bad is it going to be? Or will it be a damp squib?



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:39 PM
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It's not a 'radioactive solar blast'. It's a cloud of protons. They're not 'radioactive' like nuclear waste. But then, WND isn't renowned for getting science right.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


prop.hfradio.org... has us listed under a G2 geomagnetic storm (Moderate). Here are the current NOAA Alerts: www.swpc.noaa.gov... Likely, this is a semi-serious event, with no real way for laymen to predict the effects on our power-grid or satellites. It is most likely to effect developing nations more heavily than us. Yet, it is always a good idea to be prepared. Think black-out event, is most likely.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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A slightly over the top thread title I think, but here's some info for you too digest





posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


Yet again world nut daily shows its penchant for sensationalist headlines ahead of actually informing people.

CME's are not "radioactive" - they include electomagnetic radiation - radio waves - which is not the same thing as ionizing radiation at all.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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A wonderful CME. Filled with High Spectrum Light and Love if you reach for that, please do.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by poet1b

RADIOACTIVE SOLAR BLAST TO HIT EARTH


mobile.wnd.com

A burst of radioactive solar particles has erupted from the Sun, streaking toward Earth at 900 miles per second, NASA has announced.
Read more at mobile.wnd.com...
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 17-3-2013 by Rising Against because: Removed all caps title.


We are constantly bathed in the Sun's "radiation"... without said radiation we all die.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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Can we have this in laymen's terms


Are we going to die or is this normal? The title made me think we're going to die because that # sounds dangerous to a person who doesn't know zip about the full effects of the sun



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


1 couldn't find this data on the NASA links poet1. Is this verified elsewhere?



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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I take it the science writer at WND is kinda new and hadn't been through major ...or MINOR...solar storm events before, eh? I mean..this is how I might have put it too ...when I was FIRST learning how solar energy and bleed into space worked. Err.. 900 miles per second. Golly... Someone better get out there with a ticket book!

Seriously, OP.. absolutely nothing against your thread..and one flag is from me! It's important to know these things so if a cell phone goes funny or something else happens during the event here ..people will know what to bitch at for whatever little glitch they have. The Sun did it!

(If anything.. I'm watching the lack of solar activity over months now and getting a sense of growing unease. This needs to PICK UP. This is a good thing!
)



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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Well what you know WND got it half right www.scienceworldreport.com... form the link

A Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) has blasted off the surface of the Sun, heading straight towards Earth at a staggering 900 miles per second, NASA announced.

In such bursts of solar winds and magnetic fields, billions of tons of radioactive solar particles get released into space. This time, a significant amount of it is headed directly towards Earth.

At the speed which those particles are moving, they can reach Earth in a day or so, scientists say. And “speed” is an important factor when it comes to the impact of these phenomena. CME’s moving at this high rate of speed usually create mild to moderate effects on the Earth.

It’s worth clarifying the difference between CME and Solar Flare. Solar Flares happen quite a bit more frequently than CME’s, and occasionally, a CME happens directly after a Solar Flare, but not always, and scientists have yet to develop the relationship between Solar Flares and CME’s.

NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and ESA/NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) observed and recorded the event, and experimental research models have shown that the CME left the surface of the Sun at speeds of around 900 miles per second.

The same experimental models are revealing that the particle flow will directly affect two of NASA’s space instruments, the Spitzer and Messenger spacecraft. NASA has warned the mission scientists from these two spacecraft, and the mission commanders will take appropriate steps to keep particle radiation from tripping on-board instruments.

MESSENGER’s mission is to conduct an in-depth study of the sun’s closest neighbor, Mercury, the least explored of the terrestrial planets that also include Venus, Earth and Mars. After its launch on Aug. 2, 2004, MESSENGER’s voyage and mission directive included three flybys of Mercury in 2008 and 2009 and a year-long orbit of the planet starting in March 2011, with additional mission directives being assigned as need be.
well will shall see if power gets knocked out, if Sat's fail or if the web is still up come tomorrow. 2013 is being a brute of a year



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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Even if some DONT believe this planet AND others has/have physical overseer SOL/Stars (Connection) as with ALL other in its/their range(s), even the dark MOON areas out there that don't get direct Sun/STAR Light but do and ARE receiving its Chemical Compound Radiation mixtures reaching those colder darker areas. So EA*RTH activities...? Maybe SOL taking a better look @ why SEAS and Undergrounds are sending RADIATING signals of the Artificial Brand from Defense and Offense.

NAMASTE*******



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by sanitus
reply to post by poet1b
 


prop.hfradio.org... has us listed under a G2 geomagnetic storm (Moderate).


We get moderates a lot. Usually no big deal.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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So are we gonna die tomorrow? I doubt the calculus test on Wednesday that I'm studying for is going to happen if we're all glowing in the dark.


I'm getting to the point where I don't even click on WND links anymore.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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I agree, the article title is a bit over the top, but sensationalism sells, and it is the title of the report.

I had searched a couple of times for more information, and came to ATS expecting a thread to have already been started, so I posted one, when I saw no other.

It looks like this just happened, and was not predicted. How long has it been since we had a solar blast coming right at us? It looks like it will be very close to high noon tomorrow where I live when it hits.

How good is our ability to predict the effects of a direct hit? Might be nothing, or it could be major. We will find out tomorrow. Major would be serious communications disruptions. Possibly power interruptions, maybe wide spread blackouts, but I doubt it.

Hopefully we will get more info as NASA dials in on the event.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by bekod
 


Thanks for the link. I was tring to find more information.

I find this comment from your link to be a bit puzzling and a bit ominous.


CME’s moving at this high rate of speed usually create mild to moderate effects on the Earth.


If CMEs usually create mild to moderate effects, will this effect increase consideray with a direct hit? Do CMEs shooting out no where near us create mild to moderate effects? And if so, what can we expect from a direct hit?



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by poet1b
If CMEs usually create mild to moderate effects, will this effect increase consideray with a direct hit?


Yes. The effect of a CME on the earth falls into two categories - there's an energetic effect where you have charged particles (hydrogen plasma) moving at a high rate of speed hit the magnetic field of the Earth. This causes a shock wave, the ionosphere and magnetosphere will oscillate back and forth sort of like when you put your hand out the window of a moving car. The effect of this on US is that it induces what we call 'geomagnetic heave'. The effect of heave is to induce a pseudo-DC offset current into long power lines. Enough of that, and you get saturation of transformers, followed by a loud, bright, multicolored 'bang'.

The other effect is to put trapped high speed particles into loops in the inner magnetosphere/upper ionosphere, where they'll loop around and around for weeks, smacking into satellites in LEO. That's a problem, because they cause damage to solar panels, and when they hit metal they convert the energy into x-rays which damage electronics. If it gets to be ENOUGH of a problem, we'll fire up some devices that'll divert the particles into the ionosphere, you'll get some pretty lights and the problem will end.



Do CMEs shooting out no where near us create mild to moderate effects? And if so, what can we expect from a direct hit?



No. If it's a miss, no effect. The bigger the CME, the more particle issues, the faster the CME, the more power line issues.
edit on 17-3-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)





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