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New Comet C/2013 E2 (IWAMOTO)

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posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by Trillium

Originally posted by abeverage



Ya thing are heating up
here JPL info on it
ssd.jpl.nasa.gov...


Why? It is not an Earth Crosser and it is actually not a crosser on any of the inner planets...why worry?


Thrust me it not about the one they tell us I worry about

It the combination of all the other one why so many that 4 or 5 now for this year
Interesting time that for sure.


I am curious how old you are? Which ones don't they tell you about? Do you know there is an Army of Amateurs who watch out for you and that many Comets are discovered by Amateurs? I am one of them! I promise you and any other ATS member who is worried we will tell you about any NASA misses or doesn't (LOL) tell you about!

The reason I ask your age is this year is a great year for comets but there have been others recently! About 15 years ago there Hale-Bopp that was very visible! Unfortunately due to DOOM & GLOOM some people in cult (Heaven's Gate listened to an Idiot and committed suicide! Thinking it was a sign the world was going to end...well they missed out on 15 more years! I am sure their family misses them...

I am excited because I will hopefully get to photograph some! I tried tonight but got skunked by clouds again! And ISON later this year may even be visible during the day. Now I hope that it is not the Year of the Comet with zombies but I am sure we will be ok!




posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by abeverage
 


Ya remember Heaven's Gate and Hale-Bopp
I'am 58 been looking up for quite a few year.
To me it just a passing interese. that I do every two week off work a month



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by Trillium
reply to post by abeverage
 


Ya remember Heaven's Gate and Hale-Bopp
I'am 58 been looking up for quite a few year.
To me it just a passing interese. that I do every two week off work a month



Well then your comment about the "ones they tell us about " was a joke? We are in a very Golden age of comet/asteroid discover right now. The whole NASA keeping evidence of an object larger than 500m conspiracy has been invalid for a good 20 years now. Amateurs find more NEO's then ever before and often re-define detection techniques.

There are people that read these threads with little or no knowledge about space that will believe silly nonsense like this so I wanted to clarify.



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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I've said this in numerous threads, We do have a few comets in sight for this year. Comets tend to pick up bodies in space due their gravity. Comet Lemmon has already passed, Panstarrs you can see now. And supposedly Ison has at least 7 or 8 companions, that they can see. It's odd that those threads got 404'd. Next week an asteroid hits the Atlantic huh. Isn't that on the 20th or 21st???



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by thepolish1
I've said this in numerous threads, We do have a few comets in sight for this year. Comets tend to pick up bodies in space due their gravity. Comet Lemmon has already passed, Panstarrs you can see now. And supposedly Ison has at least 7 or 8 companions, that they can see. It's odd that those threads got 404'd. Next week an asteroid hits the Atlantic huh. Isn't that on the 20th or 21st???



I haven't got the correct name for this asteroid to hit the Atlantic in a week or so, but it was DA2013 ??? and people on GLP checked it out on Google and other web space and astronomy sites and found nothing, not listed.. Personally, i think it's a hoax.



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by mclinking
 


It is a hoax. We can't even pinpoint with any accuracy where a satellite with a decayed orbit will hit except for a rough estimate of latitude, so why would we be able to predict where an asteroid would hit with greater accuracy?



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:53 AM
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Originally posted by thepolish1
Comets tend to pick up bodies in space due their gravity.


No they don't. Comets are typically only a few km across, and their gravity is so weak that if you jumped hard enough you would reach the escape velocity. When there is "stuff" travelling next to the comet, it is certainly something that comes off the comet itself as it breaks up.


Originally posted by thepolish1
And supposedly Ison has at least 7 or 8 companions, that they can see.


No it doesn't. The so-called companions are simply hot pixels on the sensor.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.cometisonnews.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Ok, I stand corrected, I had also stated that Ison "supposedly" had companions, and "I don't know" That is far from trying to make my comment seem like fact. But thank you wildespace.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by thepolish1
reply to post by wildespace
 


Ok, I stand corrected, I had also stated that Ison "supposedly" had companions, and "I don't know" That is far from trying to make my comment seem like fact. But thank you wildespace.

There is another thread re ISON showing anl image from an Italian astronomer showing ISON followed by several asteroids. This has been confirmed by others. Here, we are not talking about the pixels. I saw 4 asteroids moving in this image.. I have kept a copy of this on my pc but don't know how to upload it here. You could also do a search on ATS.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Re ISON, here is the thread in question showing the comet plus asteroids

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by mclinking
 


In that thread is a detailed explanation by a highly experienced astrophotographer confirming that the anomaly is in fact hot pixels followed by confirmation from the actual photographer of the image,

Here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by wildespace
I see a very bright pixel following the comet (to the left and slightly lower), dimming out of view for a couple of seconds and then appearing again but fainter. If it's just a dodgy pixel on the sensor, it would be strange that it follows the comet. There's also a smaller (fainter) pixel to the upper left of the bright one, following in the same direction.

I'll ask around on astronomy goups.

The hot pixel will follow the motion of the telescope, which in this case was probably tracking the comet over time (either autoguiding on it or through external software). When he then went and made the gif animation he registered the images relative to the stars, not to the comet, thus the hot pixels follow the comet. I sent Mr. Lawrence a tweet and asked him to confirm this, will post his reply if he replies; he's fairly well-known in the UK and I'm sure quite busy.
edit on 17-1-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)


and here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Incidentally, the photographer of OP's image, Pete Lawrence confirmed it was noise in the image (ie, hot pixels), and that the tracking drift of his telescope was coincidentally in the same direction as the comet over time.

"Pete Lawrence ‏@Avertedvision




posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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Wish "We" could all see the AMAZING different Colors they possess when captured out by SATURN etc. YES there have been and ARE those images but.
AMAZING can any imagin the REAL colors that the human EYE spectrum of Vision would see.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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Here the new meteor i got last night



youtu.be...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Here Stellarium view of my camera


This camera is 720X 480 sh*ty lens bad match
edit on 17-3-2013 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Insomniac
reply to post by mclinking
 


In that thread is a detailed explanation by a highly experienced astrophotographer confirming that the anomaly is in fact hot pixels followed by confirmation from the actual photographer of the image,

Here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by wildespace
I see a very bright pixel following the comet (to the left and slightly lower), dimming out of view for a couple of seconds and then appearing again but fainter. If it's just a dodgy pixel on the sensor, it would be strange that it follows the comet. There's also a smaller (fainter) pixel to the upper left of the bright one, following in the same direction.

I'll ask around on astronomy goups.

The hot pixel will follow the motion of the telescope, which in this case was probably tracking the comet over time (either autoguiding on it or through external software). When he then went and made the gif animation he registered the images relative to the stars, not to the comet, thus the hot pixels follow the comet. I sent Mr. Lawrence a tweet and asked him to confirm this, will post his reply if he replies; he's fairly well-known in the UK and I'm sure quite busy.
edit on 17-1-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)


and here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Incidentally, the photographer of OP's image, Pete Lawrence confirmed it was noise in the image (ie, hot pixels), and that the tracking drift of his telescope was coincidentally in the same direction as the comet over time.

"Pete Lawrence ‏@Avertedvision



Yes there was a lot of talk on FaceBook and ATS here
Even got the picture of when the first was ask here and facebook





posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by Insomniac
reply to post by mclinking
 


In that thread is a detailed explanation by a highly experienced astrophotographer confirming that the anomaly is in fact hot pixels followed by confirmation from the actual photographer of the image,

Here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by wildespace
I see a very bright pixel following the comet (to the left and slightly lower), dimming out of view for a couple of seconds and then appearing again but fainter. If it's just a dodgy pixel on the sensor, it would be strange that it follows the comet. There's also a smaller (fainter) pixel to the upper left of the bright one, following in the same direction.

I'll ask around on astronomy goups.

The hot pixel will follow the motion of the telescope, which in this case was probably tracking the comet over time (either autoguiding on it or through external software). When he then went and made the gif animation he registered the images relative to the stars, not to the comet, thus the hot pixels follow the comet. I sent Mr. Lawrence a tweet and asked him to confirm this, will post his reply if he replies; he's fairly well-known in the UK and I'm sure quite busy.
edit on 17-1-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)


and here...


Originally posted by ngchunter

Incidentally, the photographer of OP's image, Pete Lawrence confirmed it was noise in the image (ie, hot pixels), and that the tracking drift of his telescope was coincidentally in the same direction as the comet over time.

"Pete Lawrence ‏@Avertedvision



Incorrect.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

States quite clearly that there is an asteroid and confirmed by others on this thread. What you have quoted precedes the Italian image. Neverthless, time will tell.



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by mclinking
 


The Italian image predates the OP image. The Italian image does have asteroids in it, the OP's image only has one unrelated asteroid a long distance from the comet. If there were asteroids following the comet they would be in all images.



posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by Insomniac
reply to post by mclinking
 


The Italian image predates the OP image. The Italian image does have asteroids in it, the OP's image only has one unrelated asteroid a long distance from the comet. If there were asteroids following the comet they would be in all images.


If so, where have they gone?



posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 01:55 AM
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Originally posted by mclinking

Originally posted by Insomniac
reply to post by mclinking
 


The Italian image predates the OP image. The Italian image does have asteroids in it, the OP's image only has one unrelated asteroid a long distance from the comet. If there were asteroids following the comet they would be in all images.


If so, where have they gone?


If there were asteroids following the comet they would be in all the images, as they are not we can assume that the asteroids are not following the comet.

The asteroids that did appear in the two images are continuing on their own orbits around the sun totally independent of the comet.

The hot pixels that were mistaken for asteroids were just hot pixels.



posted on Mar, 18 2013 @ 04:18 AM
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reply to post by mclinking
 

The biggest clue is that the "companions" are well-defined and occupy exactly one pixel each. Real asteroids look a bit smudged on images, and the brighter they are the bigger they look. This very bright dot that occupies only one pixel cannot be a real space object.

If there's a video of the comet with real asteroids, I'd like to see it. However, when asteroids are indeed seen in the same image as the comet, it doesn't mean they are following it.
edit on 18-3-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)






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