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Need to Replace Slow DSL

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posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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Gentlemen ... Ladies ...

I'm just about at my wits' end. The place where I work is at approximately the end of civilization--or what passes for civilization in Vallejo, CA. Our building stands beside the last telephone pole on our street. In the side-lot is a Sprint cell tower. They had to pull their fiber-optic cable through our warehouse, purlin-to-purlin, to get it from the pole to their tower.

In a nutshell, we're far from the nearest substation, and thus we are suffering severe DSL deprivation. AT&T sold us 4-megabit service--and it went flaky. And flakier. They eventually decided that the highest stable speed we could get was 1.5Mb, so they cut us back to that. And that's on a good day.

The way it works is that they guarantee "up to" 1.5Mb. In reality they will only deal with complaints if it falls below 0.38Mb. And it normally hovers around that speed. If it drops to 0.37Mb they ... do something ... and it jumps back up to 1.5 for awhile.

So the 16 machines that require Internet connection share that. This is not an ideal situation.

End of November of last year, AT&T made their "we can save you money on your phone bill" call. We usually curse them and hang up, but this time someone took the call. They wanted to sell us U-Verse. We bit--and they strung us along until a week ago before cancelling. Seems you can only have 1 DSL per address, and Sprint already has 25 DSLs at our address. (I know--makes no sense. But that only means you cannot argue with them using any brand of "human" logic.)

So we tried Comcast. We were all ready to sign the contract when they sprung their little "gotcha!" They wanted us to pay $2000 for the cost of stringing their cable the last 200 feet. (This is the third time we've played that particular game. They always pretend that everything's "GO" for a few weeks before springing their nasty little trap.)

Well--my boss is both stubborn and cheap. He won't pay for T1, and we can't get anything else.

SO! Any ideas? (Not satellite--he's already rejected that categorically.) Anybody?

edit on 3/13/2013 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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have you looked into wimax/4G USB data sticks/routers?

I think for about 30 bucks a month you can get 3+ meg/sec.

edit on 13-3-2013 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by Biigs
have you looked into wimax/4G USB data sticks/routers?

I think for about 30 bucks a month you can get 3+ meg/sec.

edit on 13-3-2013 by Biigs because: (no reason given)


Tell me a little more before I go look it up. Now remember--stubborn and cheap....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:38 PM
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Instead of getting your internet through a cable you have a router or USB stick (or any 4G sim/device for that matter) which picks up a wider, long range version of WIFI.

No idea if thats going to work out for your price range or even if you get a good enough signal, just an idea



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


OK. Thanks. If we're talking about $30/mo. per 16 machines--that's, you know, even more expensive than T1. I'll look a little further.

Thanks again....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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First,tell your boss how much money he is losing due to slow productivity.That is if his business depends on it.

See if you can get a contractor to do the last 200 feet cheaper.

There is also mobile wifi devices you could look into .



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by Ex_CT2
reply to post by Biigs
 


OK. Thanks. If we're talking about $30/mo. per 16 machines--that's, you know, even more expensive than T1. I'll look a little further.

Thanks again....


The routers will allow you to use one connect to the wireless internet, and the 16 machines connect to that so you will only have one sub.

It may get more complicated if you wish to use separate devices, i would imagine that a single router either with WIFI combined or it connected to another WIFI router, would serve all your needs.

However this is just an idea if cabling is a nightmare, and subject to signal fluctuations - probably not good for a busniess that relies on it. Ive not used this sort of service myself, as im luckily enough to have a fast exchange near by for some fiber/adsl2 goodness


Good luck!



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:51 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
First,tell your boss how much money he is losing due to slow productivity.That is if his business depends on it.

See if you can get a contractor to do the last 200 feet cheaper.

There is also mobile wifi devices you could look into .


Heh. Yeah. We tried the "productivity" argument; even threw in "morale" for good measure. No joy.

The contractor idea is good. That's definitely worth looking into. The thing is, Comcast says the true cost is $6500, of which they're willing to eat $4500. But a second opinion from a contractor is a good idea.

The mobile wifi, from what I understand, is good ... if you only have one or two people connecting to it; then it starts to drag. I really should look further into that, though.

Thanks, kdog....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


Actually there's a story attached to this; I was just being lazy. The boss sprung for smart phones for himself, a couple of salesmen, and his kid. (I say "kid"; he's about 30 years old.)

They kept paying huge overages on the kid's wifi (not so cheap when it comes to his kid). Turns out the kid lives nextdoor to a barbershop. Every time he turned his hotspot on, all the customers at the barbershop were connecting. They all thought Fred the Barber was providing free internet with his haircuts!

Anyway, I keep thinking: 16 people. BIGtime overage....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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How close is the nearest building that gets good Broadband?
and can you see it from your building?
i have a plan!!!



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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I gotta go pick up the roommate at the BART station, run an errand or two.

Be back in an hour or so. Please no one feel slighted if I don't respond right away....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by rigel4
How close is the nearest building that gets good Broadband?
and can you see it from your building?
i have a plan!!!


I smell a handshake and some directional radio networking!
edit on 13-3-2013 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by rigel4
How close is the nearest building that gets good Broadband?
and can you see it from your building?
i have a plan!!!


There's a trailer park across the fence. Office is about 100 feet from our front office.

Listen--like I said, I gotta run. Take your time formulating this. I'll be back in about an hour....



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by Ex_CT2
 


Link

The link is a British seller but I am sure you will get this stuff in the states.

The idea here is to get broadband delivered where you know its good to another line of sight building.

You then just hook up your long range access point which works with power over Ethernet and point it at your building.
You then hoist another unit up on your roof as a bridge run it down to a switch onto your network.

I have set these devices up over lakes and dog legged them round hills and woods.

They can be set-up very securely, and have a range up to 20 miles line of sight. Various aerials and
accessories can be be purchased , but unless the distances are really far you wont need pig tail directional aerials

I can get very detailed about these if needed.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


Well done



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by rigel4
reply to post by Biigs
 


Well done


I've built a point to point radio network link before, to save on an astronomical cabling installation fee. Due to a new road being put in between our buildings we had to either get a separate internet connection and VPN link between them, or put a giant super cable round the whole new building in the way.

I decided point to point directional link and saved a HUGE amount, however it did go down some times, metal sided trucks right in the way messed with it - so not perfect.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


They need to be up as high as possible on the building, sometimes though, they do....
just go down.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 08:02 PM
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Originally posted by rigel4
reply to post by Ex_CT2
 


Link

The link is a British seller but I am sure you will get this stuff in the states.

The idea here is to get broadband delivered where you know its good to another line of sight building.

You then just hook up your long range access point which works with power over Ethernet and point it at your building.
You then hoist another unit up on your roof as a bridge run it down to a switch onto your network.

I have set these devices up over lakes and dog legged them round hills and woods.

They can be set-up very securely, and have a range up to 20 miles line of sight. Various aerials and
accessories can be be purchased , but unless the distances are really far you wont need pig tail directional aerials

I can get very detailed about these if needed.


Learn something every day. This looks very tasty and useful. I'm thinking we could even offer to pay the trailer-park guy's DSL bill and still come out ahead. (Of course we'd offer to pay half the bill first
.) Yeah. I like this. Looks like we have a winner....

ETA: BTW, concerning your response to biigs: We put our outside security cameras on some tall masts. We can go however high we need. (I work for a fastener wholesaler. Every fastener you can imagine, from the size of cellphone screws to the gigantic carriage bolts that hold bridges together. We all look for any excuse to break out the toolboxes
.)
edit on 3/13/2013 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 08:07 PM
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Sorry if this is being super stupid of me: But assuming your have standard copper lines for phones, is ADSL not an option or are you still too far from the exchange?



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Biigs
Sorry if this is being super stupid of me: But assuming your have standard copper lines for phones, is ADSL not an option or are you still too far from the exchange?


When you say ADSL, are you referring to T1? Or some sort of partial T1? We'd take partial T1 if we could get it, but they don't offer it.









 
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