UK Vacay: Advice Please!

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posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 04:51 PM
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Hello all.

My wife and I will be visiting London in May (if I'm not on no-fly list of course), and this will be our first journey to UK. We've been researching looking for interesting and worthwhile things to do while we're there, but to be honest its a bit overwhelming. We're only there for about 9 days and I was hoping some members could recommend some "don't miss" type attraction no too far from the city, and if anyone has any tips or suggestions in general regarding travel in that part of the world, it would be appreciated.

Thanks to everyone in advance!




posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


ok firstly where are u flying into, what do you mean by near the city ? London? You should go to Edinburgh my favourite city in the UK also Stonehenge is suprsingly enjoyable as something to do bit of a drive though. If your looking to party Brighton is worth a trip nice cultural shopping to be done in the "lanes" there and it is close to London.

I havent explored London much but have enjoyed camden and there is obviously allot to do there, Buckingham palace, the tower of london, the natural history museum, the tate etc( In London) , personally i do not like the bustle of the place, but then again im generally travelling through. Newcastle is also worth a visit for a bit of a party (stag and hen capitol of europe) if u get time . Depends what you are looking for the lake ditrict is also lush and rolling countryside if you have transport.

Hope you have fun
edit on 13-3-2013 by larapa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 

Someobody else asked the same question in the thread "Going to London in a couple of months", and many ideas came out of that. That thread would be worth investigating.
Obviously a lot depends on what you like to see/do, but one suggestion I would make is LEAVE London for at least one day and see what else there is.
Take a train to a relatively close location like Canterbury or Rochester (cathedrals, castles, town walls), and just watch the passing countryside at the same time.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


It depends on what your interests are. Most Americans when they move out from London go to Stratford-Upon-Avon and the Shakespeare tour. You can go to Ironbridge in Shropshire which was the birthplace of The Industrial Revolution. There is also England's finest castle at Warwick.
If you like good food then Birmingham has the best restaurants outside London and also you can do the Tolkien tour in Birmingham if you like The Lord Of The Rings stuff.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Depends on how far you want to travel. My advice would be Oxford, Stratford Upon Avon and Warwick for historical stuff. They're about 1.5 hours away by train and sort of clustered together. Bath for Roman stuff (bit further) about an hour from Warwick. You could do the 4 in 2 days. They are huge tourist spots but that's for a reason. Look those towns up on Wikipedia and you'll see they're packed with history and things to see and do. Stonehenge is close to bath so you could include that if you wanted to. Hope it's everything you want it to be. Have fun.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


If i were you i would get out of London.

I don't like the place myself, to crowded and dirty.

Try a few days in Devon and/or Cornwall, you get it all there.

Rolling country side, hills, moors, loads of history and the best coastline in England.

Also if you drive there from London you go past Stonehenge, always worth a look.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by marvinthemartian
 

Devon and Cornwall can't be beaten, but I was thinking of the time factor.
Overnight stay would be required.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:27 PM
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Nice! A good place to spend a vacation. I was living there all summer back in 2011.
Definitely try to visit the British Museum, there's millions of things to check out dating all the way back to the Sumerians. Could always check out Abbey Road while you're around there!
There's also the London Eye which has a great view. There's some neat crypts to check out, and St. Paul's Cathedral is pretty epic. And don't forget about the Parliament buildings with the ol' Big Ben. I personally found just wandering the city looking at the mix of old and new buildings to be amazing.
Hope the trip goes well!



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Regarding how you get about then that really depends on you and your willingness to drive or take buses and trains. Trains are OK but it's best to book in advance as that saves lots of money. The Motorways are easy to travel on and relatively jam free but if you start from London then you'd have to find your way out and then back in and that isn't easy especially as for you you'll be driving on the "wrong" side of the road. Again depends on your ability and fortitude. In London itself you'll be using the Underground rail system which connects up to all the major rail and bus stations so public transport is less hassle and will certainly give you a more authentic experience. If you decide to go by train here's the website to book tickets.linky



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 11:35 PM
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thanks everyone for all your responses! i knew ATS would prove super-helpful in this capacity


my wife has now discovered a small plane which takes people from Bristol to Paris. has anyone here ever done this? it seems well-priced for such a convenience.

Stonehenge is for certain on our list. how long do people usually spend there? is it something that you would spend a day on? half day? and hour?



posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 

If you're going to be based in London, the most convenient route to both Bristol and would be by train from Paddington station, the standard station for points west of London, including Oxford.
The stop for Stonehenge would be Salisbury, worth time in itself.
But a visit to Stonehenge, for example, would really demand a two-nght stay in the area, so that you could go sight-seeing in the full day between them.
The same would apply to any visits at any distance from London, which is why i suggested a couple of places near enough for day-trips.
England is not really a "short hops by air" culture, so you need to be conscious of the time factor for road and rail travel.

PS Having just checked, Salisbury trains leave from Waterloo station, so I've just edited it out of the list of places you reach from Paddington.
Times by rail;
Oxford one hour from London (a very small city, colleges concentrated in one area- that would be good for a day-trip)
Salisbury, two hours.
edit on 14-3-2013 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Thank you for the info friend! The suggestions are piling up quickly. I can see this as another trip where there's too much to see and we end up trying to do too much and running ourselves ragged. I'm hoping to spend some time in Traditional English Pubs as well



posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 11:29 AM
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The most impressive thing I've seen in this country is stone henge. It's worth paying for the audio headset thing, that gives you a description of what each bit represents and of the surrounding area. Really brings it to life.

Stratford upon Avon is worth a visit if you have the time and the Cotswalds are beautiful part of the country. You can drive through the Cotswalds on the way to stone henge.

Don't forget an umbrella and some warm clothes.
edit on 14-3-2013 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 07:29 AM
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To get around in the city proper, really use the Underground (subway/trains). As kids, I remember my brother and I going off on our own a couple times, and using it to get around, so easy to figure out. (come to think of it, what the hell were my parent's thinking? Different time I guess)......



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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Since the Underground has been mentioned, two points worth remembering.
First, when you look at the diagram map of the system, you will see an oblong shape representing the Circle Line. Most of the "sights" of London will be within that rectangle, so that's the part that would be important. The lines branching outwards from there are mainly for commuters.

Secondly, don't be misled by the sign "Subway". It doesn't have that meaning in England. If you follow that sign, it won't take you to the railways, just to the other side of the street. (I once met a pair of very puzzled Americans,remarking that things had obviously been changed around, but I didn't realise until afterwards that this was the mistake they must have made)

edit on 15-3-2013 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by Urantia1111
thanks everyone for all your responses! i knew ATS would prove super-helpful in this capacity


my wife has now discovered a small plane which takes people from Bristol to Paris. has anyone here ever done this? it seems well-priced for such a convenience.

Stonehenge is for certain on our list. how long do people usually spend there? is it something that you would spend a day on? half day? and hour?




If you take a look in my thread, I think I mentioned that there was actually tour busses that go through there, I don't remember how long they stay but that may be another option. I believe there is one that goes from london to stonehenge and then to Bath and they have a few different routes so it would just depend on the time you want to spend. In Bath that is where a Roman bath is it's kinda cool I think. But I guess when Rome was at it's peak the nobles would go to Bath.



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





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