Remember when earthquakes weren't so common in the Central U.S.?

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posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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I can remember through the years growing up in the Midwest, when you heard about an earthquake in our region, you were like, whoa, really? Now, not so much, they are happening more and more often in the New Madrid zone that it barely makes the news anymore. A small 2.7 quake hit near Benton, IL which is in the far southern part of the state on Monday night. The quake caused little to no damage and was in a very rural area.

Small earthquake hits southern IL

The New Madrid has been getting a lot of attention here on ATS lately, since the increase in these small tremors has picked up over the past two years.

A few months ago, a 4.3 quake struck in Kentucky that was felt across 12 states. Two weeks later, a 3.6 rattled Mt. Carmel, IL. The same night that the IL quake struck, a smaller 2.9 was felt in Edmond, OK. The Kentucky quake was felt in Knoxville where it even set off some panic as homes rattled and walls shook. All three of these quakes were shallow, Kentucky’s was just over 12 miles deep, and that’s why it was felt over such a wide area.

There have been a lot of tremors along the fault line recently, even two small 1.7 tremors in New Madrid, MO itself on March 9. Trumann, AR had a small 2.3 yesterday, but the same time felt a 3.6 in the same spot on February 23. In just the last week, MO and AR have had five small quakes along the New Madrid fault.

This map shows 309 earthquakes in the last 6-month period in the Central United States. That’s a lot of quakes. Some of these are surely hydraulic fracking quakes, while many are not and they are close to the New Madrid fault line.

Map source



So what exactly is the New Madrid fault? It’s a fault line that’s 20 times the size of the famed San Andreas Fault in California. The New Madrid covers parts of Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Tennessee. Also Alabama and Oklahoma may be a part of this according to FEMA.

The New Madrid experienced four large quakes in 1811-12 that were all 7.0 or larger, one of them caused the Mississippi River to run backwards, was felt as far away as Boston and they all caused large fissures to open up in the earth. The New Madrid had one more large quake in 1968 in Dale, IL that registered 5.4 and then it’s been quiet, until these past couple of years.

Many strange occurrences have been happening along this region of the country, from as far south as Louisiana and it’s sinkholes up to Arkansas and their mass animal die-offs (we all remember Beebe, AR, and the birds falling from the sky) up into Tennessee where there have been numerous reports of strange sky noises and sonic booms, not to mention animal die-offs there as well.

I won’t get it into all that right now. I’ve shared my thoughts on that on my other methane gas threads. You can read them in my signature. But, I do believe that these fissures are releasing methane gas in the central part of the US, which may be resulting in the strange sky noises, sonic booms, and mass animal die-offs.

One geologist says that he believes the new activity along the New Madrid may be the direct result of the BP oil spill. He believes that the New Madrid is tied directly to deeply buried tectonics in the Gulf of Mexico.

This geologist, Jack Reed, is a retired Texaco geologist-geophysicist. He has been studying the geology of the Gulf of Mexico for over 40 years and he said that, “this entire zone through the United States is suffering some type of tectonic activity that I believe is tied to the deeply buried tectonics of the Gulf of Mexico.”

But could it have been BP spill? It’s quite possible. Some also believe that this spill may also be indirectly tied to the Louisiana sinkhole in Assumption Parish.

But what about the Gulf of Mexico dead zone at the mouth of the Mississippi? First, what is the dead zone?
It’s an area where less oxygen is dissolved in the water creating an environment where sea life dies and most fish that can, will swim away. The area becomes a biological wasteland.

What causes this?


The dead zone is caused by nutrient enrichment from the Mississippi River, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous. Watersheds within the Mississippi River Basin drain much of the United States, from Montana to Pennsylvania and extending southward along the Mississippi River. Most of the nitrogen input comes from major farming states in the Mississippi River Valley, including Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Nitrogen and phosphorous enter the river through upstream runoff of fertilizers, soil erosion, animal wastes, and sewage. In a natural system, these nutrients aren't significant factors in algae growth because they are depleted in the soil by plants. However, with anthropogenically increased nitrogen and phosphorus input, algae growth is no longer limited. Consequently, algal blooms develop, the food chain is altered, and dissolved oxygen in the area is depleted. The size of the dead zone fluctuates seasonally, as it is exacerbated by farming practices. It is also affected by weather events such as flooding and hurricanes.


Source

The dead zone that forms each year off the coast of Louisiana usually ranges from 1,500 square miles to 6,000 square miles. In 1988, it was only 15 square miles, but in 2002, it was over 8,000 square miles. Could it have been this year that started the migration of warm ocean waters pushed around the Florida coastline and up the East Coast across to Europe that may have been the slow trigger to the methane releases that are occurring around the world as described in the Dangerous Gas theory in my signature. Year after year, this dead zone is encompassing thousands of square miles. In 2007, after a decade of leveled off methane, it began to rise. In 2009, earthquakes started to rise as well. Here is my thread about the theory of what has caused these earthquakes to increase.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

So, could it have been the warm waters of the dead zone that affected the deeply buried tectonics of the Gulf of Mexico? Could the tectonics now be affecting the New Madrid Fault?

Well, whatever is causing it, there’s no denying that a sleeping giant may be awaking. Over the past two years these tremors have become much more common. People in these regions have always known a quake could hit, they just don’t remember them actually happening. As I said at the start of the thread, when a quake occurred in the central parts of the US prior to the past couple of years, it made the nightly news. It doesn’t anymore.

Also, it might be noted that when looking at the quake map above for the central U.S., the East Tennessee fault looks pretty active as well. This shows that the methane gas theory may be plausible here.

There’s no denying that activity has stepped up a bit in the New Madrid zone so now the questions remain, what caused it? But, more importantly, is this leading to something bigger or is it just a few hiccups in the natural order of things? Is it coincidence that this area has picked up in seismic activity right along with so many other areas?
edit on 12-3-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-3-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-3-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 05:55 PM
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Nothing to do with fracking at all,nothing,it's all hearsay.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

A long discussion on earthquakes and fracking.

edit on 12-3-2013 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-3-2013 by kdog1982 because: because I type to fast without looking



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


I dont know about the ones in the midwest but the ones in Central Texas are absolutely related to fracking.
Cleburne Tx had its first EQ in history a few months or so ago about 8 or so years after fracking began to tap the huge amounts of Nat Gas under it.
Dallas Tx had one a few months ago as well. I lived in Dallas for 25 years, my parents and grand parents many more years and none of us had ever heard of an EQ happening



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Remember when you only heard about the really big earthquakes?

Remember when you had to read the newspaper to hear about any big event?

Everythings the same. We are just more aware



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


I remember when the internet wasn't a tool used by almost everyone to report EQ's. I remember when people didn't have immediate access to government EQ data.....

I don't remember anyone saying we have more EQ's now than we did years ago. But, we didn't have the internet then either.

Des



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by TriForce
 


Ever heard of texas sharon?

www.texassharon.com...



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:05 PM
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I would love to see some historical statistics to support the claim that earthquakes have actually gone up and by how much.

Seems to me the number should be relatively consistent.

Anyone got those facts?



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


Interesting site..
I live south of the heavily fracked Eagle Ford site and I recall that Beevile Tx had a small EQ a few months ago too.
I know for a fact that there are tons of new wells being drilled in Bee County and pretty much everywhere else down here because I see the orders from the Operators that hire the drillers to drill them.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
I would love to see some historical statistics to support the claim that earthquakes have actually gone up and by how much.

Seems to me the number should be relatively consistent.

Anyone got those facts?


When you check out each earthquake in each location you can see the history of quakes,like the one the op listed in Illinois.

earthquake.usgs.gov...



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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I live near the gulf coast and a few times a week (for the last few years) i feel vibrations. Not trimmers, just vibrations. It's easy to miss. I have no clue what it comes from. I moved recently and my last house was on blocks, so I thought maybe the house was just shaking from wind blowing or whatever. But my new house is twice as big and firmly in the ground, and I'm still feeling the vibrations. No idea what this is. I feel it mostly at night in bed, when everything is still and quiet. That's the easiest time to catch them without overlooking it. But sometimes I feel them while sitting at my desk during the day. There's no earthquakes here. It's too muddy to feel them. But I'm feeling something.

I'm getting paranoid now that maybe the ground is caving in all over the place but we don't see it until the cave-ins reach the surface in these little pockets we know as sink holes.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Fracking and earthquakes you say?


Since Oklahoma began monitoring earthquakes in 1978 the Oklahoma Geological Survey said there were about fifty a year.
But in 2010, OGS recorded more than 1,000 earthquakes. While that number has stayed steady until today the agency has started researching any possible link between quakes and fracking--the process of pumping water and sand into a well to release oil and natural gas. "I went back and looked at the possibility that maybe we have more earthquakes than had been previously identified being caused by hydraulic fracturing," said Austin Holland, a research seismologist with OGS.
To answer this question he looked at earthquakes that happened within 5 miles of a well and within three weeks of fracking. The study spanned two and half years, beginning with earthquakes in 2010. Holland says he found that 2 percent--or 96--wells completed in that time period could have had a connection to an earthquake.

"Percentage-wise it's still a low likelihood of occurrence and we've not seen any earthquakes--damaging earthquakes--associated with hydraulic fracturing," said Holland. Hydraulic fracturing has increased, too. John Laws is a consulting geologist and seismologist for area oil and gas companies and said it comes down to money.

"It wasn't until the price of oil got over say, $60 dollars a barrel that that technology could be used because it's not economic below those prices," said Laws. While fracking has happened in Oklahoma for 60 years, Holland said fracking goes deeper now that it has before and that could be one reason for a connection.


www.kxii.com...



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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The center of the country is a super volcano waiting to happen.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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Yea it was before the internet came on line, and people could actually see how common they actually are




posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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You didn't hear about them because you didn't have the internet actually.

Go to the historical records and allow for ebbs and flows.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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It could be Frackin and it could be the Madrid fault. There really isn't a way to tell for sure. Maybe there is someone out there that can tell but they are probably not allowed to tell. Not unless the reason for them is proven beyond a shadow of a doubt.

Maybe some of you know someone who works at the USGS monitoring site. My only contact is with someone at the NWS locally. He has six months of food stores and alternative heat. He doesn't have a bug out bag either. I guess bug out bags are for those in the Madrid fault area


That fracken Madrid Fault is making people uneasy.
edit on 12-3-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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Heya OP. I have a couple things that may be helpful. For perspective, Quakes happen every year...as others note, but as someone who lives just outside the New Madrid Seismic Zone, well, ALL seismic activity is of interest and I don't look at anything 4 or above in this general region to be 'routine' or something to ignore.



The real interesting one though is the 2011 Scenario the USGS ran for a 7.7 New Madrid Quake in modern times. They even created a poster for quick reference of the most important data relating to the Seismic Zone.

M 7.7 New Madrid Scenario Information

For some reason, all damage and felt impact maps show my area to be in a lightly colored zone. The geology must really change at this point or nearby going East, but the Springfield region seems a safe area ..so likely a huge staging area if all this happens in our lifetimes. (It will happen again eventually..that's a 100% bet, so they say).

Given all that, the idea that they are fracking within a short mileage of the fault complex is disturbing. If one assumes the frack wells are impacting only the small area they drill, that's one thing....but if we find out the structures at those depths are more interconnected for pressure and other things? Well... Oops could be catastrophic, eh?
edit on 12-3-2013 by Wrabbit2000 because: image link didn't work



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982

Originally posted by Hopechest
I would love to see some historical statistics to support the claim that earthquakes have actually gone up and by how much.

Seems to me the number should be relatively consistent.

Anyone got those facts?


When you check out each earthquake in each location you can see the history of quakes,like the one the op listed in Illinois.

earthquake.usgs.gov...


This page you link shows 30 quakes in IL in 218 years and the last one was in 1982. There have been several in the past six months. Kinda proves my point. There are more quakes and it's not better reporting. The quakes on the map above is anything but a normal amount of quakes. The New Madrid is experiencing new activity in the last two years.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


From 50 quakes to 1,000 per year is an alarming increase and if not fracking, then, according to FEMA, Oklahoma is part of the New Madrid and we have something to be concerned about.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by Under Water
I live near the gulf coast and a few times a week (for the last few years) i feel vibrations. Not trimmers, just vibrations. It's easy to miss. I have no clue what it comes from. I moved recently and my last house was on blocks, so I thought maybe the house was just shaking from wind blowing or whatever. But my new house is twice as big and firmly in the ground, and I'm still feeling the vibrations. No idea what this is. I feel it mostly at night in bed, when everything is still and quiet. That's the easiest time to catch them without overlooking it. But sometimes I feel them while sitting at my desk during the day. There's no earthquakes here. It's too muddy to feel them. But I'm feeling something.

I'm getting paranoid now that maybe the ground is caving in all over the place but we don't see it until the cave-ins reach the surface in these little pockets we know as sink holes.


So where abouts do you live, Under Water?



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


I did extensive research on the NMSZ when I lived in Rolla, Mo 20 years ago. The majority of the opinions on the fault have changed to polar opposites twice since that time. In the '90's, the lead NMSZ researcher in Memphis then predicted a 50% probability of a 7+ quake by 2020. A few years later most opinions switched to the notion that the NM fault was a dying system that spent its last in 1811-12. In about 2007-8 the opinions changed again to say that a large quake is quite probable. There have been at least three times in the past 5 years that I have heard of more seismos being installed in Arkansas to monitor increasing activity.

Common sense should resolve any doubts about the effects of fracking. Think of a jelly do-nut; that crusty stuff on the outside keeps the gushy stuff on the inside. Put a bunch of cracks in that crust and you have a big mess. The gem mines in Arkansas are the result of past geothermal activity; and, Arkansas has hot water springs. It may not happen for another half of a million years; but, there is little doubt in my mind that the area could awaken again. With the geological history of this area, anything could happen.

If Edward Caycee's predictions come true in my lifetime, I should have ocean-front property here in central Missouri.
I love sea food!_javascript:icon('
')
edit on 13-3-2013 by supertrot because: (no reason given)





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