Choose your location wisely or be very disappointed

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posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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This isn’t really top secret but it is an appropriate topic for the Survival Forum.

Suppose for just a moment, that in the next 3-500 years we’re all safe as far as TEOTWAWKI is concerned. Despite the random earthquake, flood, hurricane, typhoon, drought, fire, or any other surprise disasters that the environment may throw at you, when you plan on your bugout location, GTOD, escape from the rat race, consider the natural resources and the environment of the place you think you want to live as well as your age and health.

I have chosen the cold Northern US. I love it. But it can be very difficult in the winter months. Our ancient but affordable snow blower went out of commission. Saturday’s snowfall and the accompanying winds made it almost impossible for us to get out and take care of our animals which live about 300 feet from the house. That doesn’t seem like much but it’s hard to walk through 300 feet in thigh high soft snow. I worked yesterday and didn’t get home til today. My SO couldn’t get out to the animals and they didn’t get fed yesterday and they really needed to be fed today. With freezing temps, critters won’t last as long without food and water as in more humane temperatures. I’m not saying they would all be dead but I don’t want to test their endurance. We don’t have snow mobiles or even snow shoes so I was getting panicky. After a MacGyver style fix, we were able to get the snow blower working and make the needed path. The recent fluctuating temperatures also created a new challenge. We had to free the doors of the barn and the rabbit house because they were frozen solidly in place. After chiseling and shoveling, more chiseling and shoveling, some swearing and prying and more chiseling and shoveling, we were able to free each door and take care of business. These types of incidents really make me wonder if I made the right decision.

I’m no spring chicken and have no one other than my even older SO to depend on. Most of the people in the area around me are my age or older. It would have been easier to move to another location but I really love the colder climate. I also felt that drought would have had less of an impact in this area, should it occur. I don’t regret my decision and I will keep on keeping on until I can’t. I’m appreciative we’re not in a similar storm such as New York’s Great White storm of 1888 but still, when you and yours are thinking about where the perfect location is, consider every possible situation about the place when deciding. I just wanted to throw this out there because although I’m elated that all is well for this moment, I’m thoughtful about my situation.




posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by Gridrebel
 

A cautionary tale about trying to second-guess disasters.
According to a story which went around in the 80's, someone had considered very carefully and worked out that there was a serious danger of war, which would probably affect the northern hemisphere and leave the southern hemisphere largely untouched.
So he decided that the safest thing to do would be to move to the southern hemisphere, preferably an isolated island somewhere.
So that's how he came to transport himself to the Falklands, just in time to greet the Argentine army.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by Gridrebel
 


Dear Gridrebel,

I don't post in this forum as a rule; but, I liked your question. I like the desert, very little competition over resources and if you understand it and know how to deal with it, the desert is the best. Deserts do not usually have large predators. The desert is a place that very few can handle; but, if you understand it, it has everything you need and more.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Just goes to show, you can can't forsee everything. But some thoughtful preparation can make a difference in your happiness and quality of life.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by AQuestion
 


I personally cannot sanely tolerate the heat. I also detest what insects and creatures warmer climates can harbor. But to each his own. I know I will be making some new preparations this spring and summer to prevent an unfortunate situation in getting to my animals next winter. Let's put it this way, it includes some wood and screws and a temporary A frame hallway from my house to my new winter mobile animal quarters



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by AQuestion
 


I tend to prefer the desert as well. There are some critters which are troublesome (scorpions, a few spiders, snakes, coyotes), but as long as you understand their habitat and take precautions, you'll be fine.

An old-fashioned windmill can draw our water for us. It is windy 99% of the time. The heat can be hard, but because it is a dry heat, it evaporates quickly into the night air, and most nights are pleasant.

However, where I'm at is around 4,000 ft in elevation, and it can get dreadfully cold here, believe it or not. The record temp for this area of Texas / New Mexico is 38 degrees F below zero!

Every place has its pros and cons. I prefer the isolation of desert areas, personally.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:40 PM
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I would probably want to be somewhere with a milder climate than my current Colorado foothills. We have chickens and a rabbit and in even a mild winter we would lose them without some sort of heat source, well at least the chickens. The rabbit is inside. I would want to be somewhere in a wooded area, or somewhere that has a lot of small back roads. I realized that here in my town there are only just a couple of ways in and out of the town. Not an easy place to protect or get out of without going down large main roads.

I hate the cold and what the hell I'm still living in Colorado for is beyond even me. I am however here until my youngest is grown and then I'm thinking somewhere like South Carolina. I can handle the heat, but the cold and snow is harder not only for me, but on the animals.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Gridrebel
 


Understood.

Can you get some cattle panels, fence posts and rebar? The cattle panels may cost around 300.00 USD or so, but bending them over to create a tunnel which can then be covered with sturdy plastic would help keep the area safe during these winter events and enable you and your SO to travel the 300 ft safely.

It can be very deadly for her to wander out, fall break a hip while you are working, she would most likely perish before you or anyone found her. The same goes for you walking out there alone, she may not even realize there is a problem until it is too late.

As we age there are ways to work smarter rather than harder and this is one of those instances where it is best to err on the side of caution.

Also by placing raised beds along the inside of this pathway to the barns, you extend your growing season and or get an early start, not to mention creating something beautiful and creative for your walk to the barn.

You can place safety lights along the way or solar, even rope or Christmas lights to maximize safety and enable you to walk out long after the sun sets.

Only the Best to you!



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by MaMaa
I would probably want to be somewhere with a milder climate than my current Colorado foothills. We have chickens and a rabbit and in even a mild winter we would lose them without some sort of heat source, well at least the chickens. The rabbit is inside. I would want to be somewhere in a wooded area, or somewhere that has a lot of small back roads. I realized that here in my town there are only just a couple of ways in and out of the town. Not an easy place to protect or get out of without going down large main roads.



Interesting about the chicken losses. Do you not have an enclosure for them? I haven't lost a chicken ever due to the cold and we have many nights in -30's F. I sure agree about being in a wooded area. That's the other thing about the desert, I feel so exposed.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


I'll check into your suggestions, they sound interesting. It definitely has to be something simple to compile and not too heavy or complicated but able to withstand 40-70 MPH winds, -30F temps and heavy snow loads. It'll be a challenge. I know I'm not going to go with 300 feet of any type of tunnel, I'll build a mini mobile barn or something to keep closer to the house for the winter season. The hazards of winter are definitely a concern for us so safety is number 1. Thanks for your words of encouragement.

Sorry, got off topic.
edit on 11-3-2013 by Gridrebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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I love the idea of the stock panel tunnel out to the barns, and an even simpler one would be PVC made into hoops over rebar, like you make for a greenhouse, and covered with plastic, and solar lights if needed.
I am an Idaho transplant to the south, and even though I love Idaho, I like the milder climate down here, and not having to fight my way through the snow anymore now that I am older. The summer humidity and bugs are no fun, for sure, but easier to deal with than the cold and snow.
Our landlord had an old trailer on acreage that he wanted a caretaker for, so we have enough room to garden, and it is working out well for us. The growing season is longer, and I am even going to try bananas this year. I have had them in the house since last fall, so there is a possibility they will bear fruit before it gets too cold and they freeze. At the least, I will have a pretty sun shelter this summer.
We had chickens in Idaho, and as long as they had a shelter at nite, they did ok. some straw is good so their feet do not get wet and then freeze, and then they will die usually. I read that it is bad to water them if it is really cold, because it freezes on the chicken, and it is better if they eat snow, but for the horses, we put out slightly warmed water for them to drink.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:20 PM
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If you study archeology, specifically the ancient spiraling petroglyphs, they are mostly found at higher elevations above flood lines, some even picturing drowning animals and people amongst extreme chaos.

With this thought alone in mind, it would be intelligent to seek sanctuary above 4000 ft on solid granite away from the closest fault line or active volcano or caldera IE: Yellow Stone. You want to put yourself as far away from any potential cataclysm and specifically on the most solid piece of rock you can at high altitude


although resources could be scarce and extremes in environment deadly, you'd have a greater chance of survival than all the rest, other than inhabitants of nuclear submarines or astronauts living off planet.

After watching the Tsunamis in japan and the pyroclastic flows of volcanoes, Ive gained great insight into the survivability of man and what is necessary for his survival during these events. even in a global extinction event


www.delagostti-industries.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:26 PM
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We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


Better make it a submarine, them pirates are thinking the same thing you are



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


Better make it a submarine, them pirates are thinking the same thing you are


Fuel will run out for them quickly and we'll be too far out for it to be an issue. If another sail powered boat wants to try and battle us that would be interesting. I hope they have a cannon.

Plus, they won't be 1000 miles offshore trying to scrounge for supplies, they will be closer to land.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


Better make it a submarine, them pirates are thinking the same thing you are


Fuel will run out for them quickly and we'll be too far out for it to be an issue. If another sail powered boat wants to try and battle us that would be interesting. I hope they have a cannon.

Plus, they won't be 1000 miles offshore trying to scrounge for supplies, they will be closer to land.


Its a small world, and a 50 caliber browning machine gun will make drift wood in seconds


better have several reverse osmosis pumps and lots of vitamin supplements and a good fish finder or youwill quickly be in trouble



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


Better make it a submarine, them pirates are thinking the same thing you are


Fuel will run out for them quickly and we'll be too far out for it to be an issue. If another sail powered boat wants to try and battle us that would be interesting. I hope they have a cannon.

Plus, they won't be 1000 miles offshore trying to scrounge for supplies, they will be closer to land.



Its a small world, and a 50 caliber browning machine gun will make drift wood in seconds


better have several reverse osmosis pumps and lots of vitamin supplements and a good fish finder or youwill quickly be in trouble


My father actually has installed a solar desalination system since reverse osmosis didn't really work out with no power or chemicals. It doesn't produce as much but its fine for our family.

You don't need a fish finder to deep sea fish (although it helps) and vitamins are easy to store. Biggest problem we found are the storms.

Storms lead to injuries.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


I didn't know that Arizona had a coast line. Or is your sailboat on a trailer or moored down in Baja.

I love the Gulf of California.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by olaru12

Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


I didn't know that Arizona had a coast line. Or is your sailboat on a trailer or moored down in Baja.

I love the Gulf of California.


Its moored out in San Diego area. Hopefully I can get out there before all the bad stuff goes down. Its one of the reasons I read this site so much.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by SPECULUM

Originally posted by Hopechest
We are taking our sailboat very far off of land.

We'll come back when all the roving gangs have departed and society restarts up again.


Better make it a submarine, them pirates are thinking the same thing you are


Fuel will run out for them quickly and we'll be too far out for it to be an issue. If another sail powered boat wants to try and battle us that would be interesting. I hope they have a cannon.

.

Plus, they won't be 1000 miles offshore trying to scrounge for supplies, they will be closer to land.



Its a small world, and a 50 caliber browning machine gun will make drift wood in seconds


better have several reverse osmosis pumps and lots of vitamin supplements and a good fish finder or youwill quickly be in trouble


My father actually has installed a solar desalination system since reverse osmosis didn't really work out with no power or chemicals. It doesn't produce as much but its fine for our family.

You don't need a fish finder to deep sea fish (although it helps) and vitamins are easy to store. Biggest problem we found are the storms.

Storms lead to injuries.


Thats why a submarine is necessary. You can elude pirates and storms

with relatively simple ballasting systems with air make up and dioxide scrubbers, you could in fact take a sailboat and convert it into a sail-submarine. just hinge your mast so it can be lowered and secured, and isolate a section within your hull to act as your sealed underwater life support pod. you can flood the rest of the boat and that will allow you to submarine, which you can control by air or piston ballasting, and sealed batteries and solar buoy's on tethers can supply power and emergency depth stops





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