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Cloud Seeding -- Spiraling Cloud Video

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posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:03 PM
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What do you guys think?

Note: The title of the video is not my title.
edit on 11/3/2013 by clairvoyantrose because: words.




posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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They are known as Morning Glory Clouds.

From wiki

The Morning Glory cloud is a rare meteorological phenomenon occasionally observed in different locations around the world. The southern part of Northern Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria is the only known location where it can be predicted and observed on a more or less regular basis due to the configuration of land and sea in the area. The settlement of Burketown attracts glider pilots intent on riding this phenomenon.


Very cool though, thanks for posting the vid. s&f
edit on 11-3-2013 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:15 PM
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This has been posted numerous times around the forum. Why not add to one of those threads?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


They used to be rare, not anymore. I've seen those rope clouds a few times now. I never saw them before about seven years ago. I worked outside a lot and always watched the clouds since my work depended on the weather.

Something is changing, I don't know why but I know it is.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:19 PM
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Here's what it looks like from above;



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by _BoneZ_
This has been posted numerous times around the forum. Why not add to one of those threads?






Definitely could have. I'll admit I didn't search if it was posted on ATS yet.


Mods can feel free to delete or move as they see fit.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Would be amazing to experience something like that for sure.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by tanda7
 


They used to be rare, not anymore. I've seen those rope clouds a few times now. I never saw them before about seven years ago. I worked outside a lot and always watched the clouds since my work depended on the weather.

Something is changing, I don't know why but I know it is.


I'm not going to say I disagree and I would not be surprised if weather is being manipulated but the main thing that has changed is the rate of information exchange.

After my grandma got cable TV, she almost panicked because she thought the weather had suddenly gone nuts, see where I'm going with this?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I'm not sure if it's just me or not but when I go outside on beautifully sunny days like today, it gets harder to keep my eyes open because of how bright it is. I have 20/20 vision and am outside every day but as each day passes you can definitely notice big changes.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by tanda7
 


They used to be rare, not anymore. I've seen those rope clouds a few times now. I never saw them before about seven years ago. I worked outside a lot and always watched the clouds since my work depended on the weather.

Something is changing, I don't know why but I know it is. [/quote


Your looking up more often???????



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:46 PM
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Here you go a....







Ominous looking yet so beautiful....



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 


That has something to do with the monitors. This new monitor is doing the same thing to my eyes. They target the wavelengths that we can see and because of this they take less power but are stronger. It is strange that the TV is clearer than the surrounding furniture. I don't think this is actually good. I can see things outside the spectrum like gasses and heat waves. I think most people can. These things don't show up on a monitor much. These sidebands we can see that are missing in the monitors soften the light



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by pacifier2012
 


I built houses, insulated houses, did concrete work, and roofed and sided buildings. Even when I worked for others, I always did things when off work that required looking at the clouds. When your livelihood is dependent on the weather you learn to always look up. Before I even worked I paid attention, having an interest in outdoor activity when I was young and being a summertime farm kid. I think over fifty years of observation is adequate expertise to make an evaluation. The really neat sunsets are not new, the increased quantity of them the last three years is by no means normal either.

I remember the great northern lights in the early sixties. I have been dying to see some of the real nice ones we have been having this cycle but every time they are nice, we have clouds or aren't able to go to the lakeshore.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


I don't think it is weather manipulation that is causing these new clouds. I think it is natural. It has something to do with the change in climate and may even be something that was listed in old texts. The snake that circled around the world may have been clouds. They may not have been referring to the milky way. Because we did not see clouds like this, we may have assumed it was the milky way.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by tanda7
 


I don't think it is weather manipulation that is causing these new clouds.


they aren't new clouds - the Aussie morning glory cloud was known to Aboriginals in the area since antiquity.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


I understand that they are not uncommon in Australia. I don't live in Australia and they aren't usually here in the USA, at least in this area. The clouds around the great lakes usually have flat bottoms, the clouds in Florida and Arizona are puff balls. In Alaska the clouds are usually like they are here also, flat bottoms.

Maybe those Morning glory clouds have applied for citizenship or something.
Sharks are common in the ocean but if I saw one in Lake Superior that would be weird.
edit on 11-3-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


I understand that they are not uncommon in Australia.


they are very uncommon in Australia - they only occur in 1 sparsely populated part of the country a few times a year.

I have never seen one at all - they do not occur anywhere near me. Indeed they only occur in very specific weather conditions anywhere

But they are not a "new type of cloud" there or anywhere else.

they may be new to you - but you should not confuse that with being new in any objective manner.






posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


My original post in this thread said they were rare. I knew that they were not new clouds. I looked up these clouds the first time I saw them about three or four years ago. Same with the glowing clouds that used to be very uncommon around the United States mainland but were common in the arctic areas. I have seen them at least a half a dozen times now.

Why the change is the big question. The climate change they talk about seems to be a viable reason why we are seeing these things more and more. I doubt if it is because of seeding or spraying.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


As I said - the fact that you are only just now aware of them does not make it a change.

Nor do increased numbers of people reporting them make it a change.

Before you can reliably say "there's been a change" you need to establish what the situation was at some point in the past, then show that it is currently something different.

So how about doing so?



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 

So you are saying that a person with credentials who works in an office is more observant than a person who has worked outdoors a major portion of his life and has been active in fishing, hunting, camping, and gardening all his life. When you tear roofs off or do work where you need to know if it is going to rain, you learn to watch the clouds. When you go fishing or hunting a lot you watch the clouds.

You don't need a degree to watch the weather.
edit on 12-3-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)





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